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Full text of "Southern Illinois University Information Service news release."

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PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 

. , -QAR9QHDALE. ILLINOIS 



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PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

UNIVE' liY 

LIBRakY 

CARBOMDAIE. ILLINGIS 




Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. aHHBnHBHK^BMBHBHHHiMaai 






1-2-4B 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. - The series of 'United Nations" 
broadcasts scheduled for each Monday at 1.30 p.m. over Station WCIL, 
Carbondale, have been divided into three main topics: "Setting up the 
United Nations Organization, Chief Organs of the U. N., and Activities 
and Services of the U. N." 

Other subtopics under "Setting up the United Nations Organizations'} 
will include lectures on "Preliminary Steps" by Dr. Frank Klingberg, 
"The Charter of the United States" by Dr. Orville Alexander, and 
"Principles, Purposes. Membership by Dr. Max Turner.^ 

The second main topic, "Chief Organs of the U. N«", has been 
subdivided into lectures on "The General Assembly" by Dr. Swartz, "The 
Security Council" by Dr. Klingberg, "The Secretariat" by Dr. Turner, 
and "The International Court of Justice" by Dr. Alexander. 

The last four broadcasts v/ill outline the "Activities and Services 
of the Ui N." and will include talks on "Settlement of Disputes" by 
Dr. Swartz, "Economics and Social Cooperation" by Dr. Turner, 
"Administration of Dependent Areas" by Dr. Alexander, and "Evaluation 
and Outlook for the Future" by Dr. Klingberg. 

These programs" were being sponsored by the University Extension 
Service as an aid to Southern Illinois women's clubs. 



### 



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SOUTHERN ITI.TNOIS ' % 




Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. wm^^BMSM^^H^^^^UB^^^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 1-2-46 

Carbondale, 111,, Jan. - Fond dreams of an undefeated season 
for the Southern Illinois University Maroons wore shattered when the 
Maroons lost their first t: - ame in nine starts to the Evansville College 
Purple Aces in the final game of the Vincennes Holiday Tournament 
New Year's day, 62 to 60. 

The Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder had previously earned the right 
to play in the finals by over-powering Cape Girardeau 65 to 43. 

Southern's first loss was to a team which had previously suffered 
defeat at the Maroons' hands 43 to 37 in a game played at Evansville. 

The absence of guard Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, who chose 
New Year's Day for his marriage, probably is partly responsible for 
Southern's defeat. Eadie, who is one »f the team's leading scorers, 
will return to the line-up after the conclusion of his honeymoon. 

Two Maroons earned a position on the tournament Ail-Star first 
team, and two more were placed on the second team. Center (^uentin 
Stinson of Eldorado and forward Joe Hughes of West Frankfort earned 
the first team mention, while forward Bob Colborn of Flora and guard 
Johnny Goss of Marion were placed on the second team. 



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sovrv MNOIS 

UNIVERSiiY LIBRARY 



Southern Illinois 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■BIBHi 

■-——-----———-———- University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. nmmmm i ■■HijMlM IF <■■■!> ■HIIIMtllMHIIIIIIII 



1-5-48 

Carbondale j 111*, Jan*. - H» B* Masters, educational director 
of the Kellogg Foundation, will visit Southern Illinois University 
Jan. 7 and 8, to observe health education work conducted by the 
University, 

The Kellogg Foundation is contributing financially to the 
University program^ joining with the University in the employment 
of a health coordinator, Ralph H» Boatman, whose work consists of 
teaching both on-campus and extension classes in health education f 
and field work with schools and other agencies of Southern Illinois 
concerned with health education* 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. -» Members of the championship Southern 
Illinois University football team will be guests of the Carbondale 
Businessmen's Association at a banquet at the University Cafeteria 
Wednesday evening, Jan* 7* 

The 1947 Maroon team won the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference title, and then, invited to play Thanksgiving Day in the 
first annual Corn Bowl at Bloomington, defeated North Central College 
for what amounted to the "college championship of Illinois*" 



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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. himh— iiiiimwhiii miamiim mil i i !■■!■■ m 



Garbondale, 111,, Jan. - More than 2,000 persons saw films from 
the Southern Illinois Audio-Visual Aids Service during the month of 
November, according to Donald A. Ingli, director of the service, 

a total of 149 films were shown, compared to 127 during November, 
1946 j. when lj>701 persons viewed the showings^ 

Showings were made before University, high school, and grade 
school classes, before extension classes, and before organizations* 



Garbondale ? 111*, Jan c - A "mountain monologist r " Miss Irene 
Bewley, will be presented Jan. 22 by the Southern Illinois University 
lectures and entertainment committee, in a series of "Smoky Mountain 
Character Sketches," Dr« P* M 1 Larson, committee chairman, announces, 

A native of the Tennessee Mountain foothills, Miss Bewley portrays 
the people with whom she has been familiar all her life,* 

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Garbondale, 111*, Jan. - 02% Marie A 9 Hinrichs, director of 
the Health Service and professor and chairman of the physiology and 
health education department at Southern Illinois University, and 
Ralph Boatman, health coordinator, are attending the meeting of the 
Statewide Planning Committee on Health Education at Charleston 
Jan. 5 and 6„ 






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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



1-7-46 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Dr. Douglas E. Lawson, professor of 
education now on leave, has been appointed new dean of the College of 
Education at Southern Illinois University, to succeed Dr. Eugene R. 
Fair, who leaves immediately for U. S, Army educational work in 
Germany, president Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Dr. Fair, who has served as first dean of the new College of 
Education since the summer of 1945, has received an assignment as 
"Educator P-6" in charge of the five teacher-training institutions 
operated by the U. S. Army in Greter Hessen. 

He and his wife and three children will sail from New York Jan. 
15. They will live in the city of Wiesbaden, near Frankfort-am-Main. 

Dr. Lawson, the new dean, has been a member of the Southern 
faculty since 1935, and obtained leave of absence last summer to 
accept a position as principal of the Punahou School in Honolulu, T.H., 
said to be the largest private elementary school in the world. 

He will assume his deanship duties here at the beginning of the 
194$ summer session or as soon thereafter as he can obtain release 
from the Honolulu school. 

Meanwhile, President Lay announced that Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, 
dean of men and professor in the College of Education, will serve as 
acting dean of the College of Education until Dr. Lawson T s arrival. 
Dr. Hiskey will continue his responsibilities as dean of men. 

Dr. Hiskey came to Southern in the summer of 1946 as associate 
professor of psychology and acting dean of men, and in the fall of 
1947 was promoted to full professor and dean of men. He was also 
named acting director of testing. He has also been in charge of 
veterans counseling services and of the student employment service. 

A two-degree graduate of Kansas State Teachers College, he holds 
the doctor's degree from the University of Nebraska. He formerly taught 
at the University of Nebraska, served for two years as a lieutenant in 
the Navy, and came to Southern from the directorship of the Fsych©- 
Educational Clinic at State Teachers College, Edinboro, Penna, 

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Dr. Lawson is an outstanding scholar in the American field of 
educational administration, President Lay pointed out. Author of one 
book, Curriculum Development in City - School Systems . published by the 
University of Chicago, he has had scores of articles published in 
educational journals, encyclopedias and other publications. 

After taking pre-law work at the University of Colorado, he 
obtained the bachelor T s and master's degree from State College of 
Colorado and the doctor of philosophy degree from the University of 
Chicago, all in the field of educational administration. He held 
fellowships at both the latter institutions. 

Dr. Lawson has been active in Southern's work in cooperation with 
the public schools of Illinois, serving as chairman of several 
statewide committees of the Illinois Educational Association, including 
a statewide committee to survey teacher-training practices, and as a 
member of other investigational and editorial groups. 

For a number of years in the late 1930 r s and early 1940 f s, Dr. 
Lawson served as consultant for Federal Works Agency conferences in 
education in a number of states, and in 1942 he served as consultant 
for the W. K. Kellogg Foundation program in Michigan and also taught 
at the University of Michigan. 

Locally, he has served on many important University committees, 
and has been active in community service, including work with the 
Carbondale Community Council and the Carbondale Community Recreation 
Board. 

### 



SOUTHERN TTTINOIS 



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^^^^^^^^^^_ ^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

p«" ■■"■ ^ ■■- ■- ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. mhhu^h^^hb^b-^^^^ 



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For release Friday p. m. 1-7-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -A new program of research was opened 

at Southern Illinois University January 1 when Dr. Carl C, Lindegren, 

internationally known authority, assumes his duties her«e as research 

a 
professor in jbfosx biological sciences and chairman of/^bbec new department 

of biological science and research, University President Chester F. Lay 

has announced. 

This will be Southern's first major venture into the field of 
research, and is expected to be the forerunner of a wide program of 
original investigations. 

Formerly exclusively a teachers training institution, Southern has 
been authorized to move into the university field in recent years, the 
latest step being a change of name which became effective last July 1. 

"As we develop into a university, we shall have to give increasing 
emphasis to research, which is one of the activities by which the status 
of a true university is measured," President Lay pointed out. 

A research laboratory is being set up for the use of Dr. Lindegren 
and his staff, which for the present will include Mrs. Lindegren, also 
widely known among biological scientists, and three assistants. The 
laboratory is located on the second floor of the Old Science Building. 

Dr. Lindegren has been associated with Washington University in 
St. Louis for a numb'er of years, and is carrying on a number of research 
projects in the field of health and nutrition under grants from societies 
and industry, which will be transferred here. 

Covering his work at Southern this year, grants have been made of 
15,000 from the American Cancer Society and another ^5,000 from the U.S. 
Public Health Service, both for research on cancer, and a $15,000 grant 
from the Anheuser-Busch Company for investigations on yeast in search foi 
cheaper vitamins and proteins. 

In addition to the grant, the Anheuser-Busch Company has by 
contract supplied approximately $30,000 of laboratory equipment to carry 
on part of the work, and this equipment is being loaned to Southern for 
the duration of the grant, subject to recall or sale to Southern at the 



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conclusion of Dr. Lindegren' s project. 

"Use of this equipment will enable Dr. Lindegren and his staff to 
start work immediately, and will give us time to accumulate necessary- 
laboratory equipment," President Lay pointed out. 

Dr. Lindegren will spend most of his time in research, but will alsc 
instruct 3&&88£S&@€b€ students in the life sciences, and especially in 
research techniques. 

Such useful discoveries as he may mrke on the yeast project will be 
available to the Anheuser-Busch Company for use, but the grantor places 
no other restrictions on his work or findings. 

Dr. Lindegren will assist the University to take out patents on all 
discoveries his laboratory may make in all cases not specifically 
excepted by agreements with grantors. 

Under the arrangements worked out for Dr. Lindegren' s service here, 
he will be authorized to spend part of his time in travel to scientific 
meetings and international scientific congresses. 

Dr. Lindegren is internationally known as a. geneticist, and has 
published approximately 100 articles in scientific journals of this and 
a half dozen other countries. 

In the past he has done research work for Swift &, Compan3>-, Benedict' 
Laboratory, the Chicago Health Department, the New York Botanical 
Gardens, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, the Mayo Clinic, Washington 
University, and the University of Washington, 

For five years he was head of the department of bacteriology at 
the University of Southern California. 

"Dr. Lindegren' s presence on our campus should prove a vast 
stimulation to our program of research and training of research 
technicians, which every true university undertakes to do," President 
Lay said. And where could we make as useful a start as in this field 
that provides increased knowledge of vitamins, nutrition, and of 
modern man's mysterious enemy, cancer? 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbbndalej Illv, Jan. -Southern Illinois University's powerful 
Maroon basketball team, owners of an eight-win and one-loss record, 
returns to the court wars this weekend with games against Millikin at 
Decatur Friday and Northern at DeKalb Saturday* 

The Northern game will open the Maroons' Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference title defense. In nine non-conference games this 
season, the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder have lost only once, 62 to 60 
against Evansville, a team Southern had previously defeated * 

Millikin fell to the Maroons 71 to 50 in December on the Southern 
floor, but the combination of steady improvement playing on their home 
floor will probably enable the Millikin team to provide more opposition 
for Southern. 

The Huskies of Northern are rated as one of the strongest teams in 
the I.I.A*C. and the result of this game will have an important bearing 
on the conference title race. 

The Maroons go into the title race with a well balanced team, since 
the scoring of the individual team members is fairly even. 

Bob Colborn of Flora is leading the scoring with 116 points, and 

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is followed by Quentin Stinson of Eldorado with 3$, Jack Eadie of West 
Frankfort with 76, Ollie Shoaff of Mt , Carmel with 71, and Joe Hughes 
of West Frankfort with 69. 

With the exception of Eadie, the totals are for nine games. 
Colborn, with 12.9 points per game, has the best average, and Eadie is 
runner-up with a per-game mark of 1C.$. 



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Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Star center Quentin Stinson of Eldorado 
has been elected captain of the Southern Illinois University Maroons 
and will lead the Maroons in their defense of the Illinois Intereollegiat 
Athletic Conference title defense which starts Saturday when the Maroons 
visit Northern at DeKalb. 

Stinson has been a consistent star during his entire three years 
on the Maroon team. The six-feet-four-incher is a great rebounder, and 
his greatest value has been under the basket where his power hes 
regularly proved to be a deciding factor in many Southern victories. 

In the scoring column, Stinson has been dependable generally 
ranking near the top for the Southern team. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Carbondale, 111*;, Jan* ^Thirty drawings in ink and pencil by 
George Morrison of Mew York City will be on exhibition at the Little 
Gallery at Southern Illinois University during the month of January* 
according to Kenneth Ervin* instructor in the University art department* 

Mr; Morrison, an American Indian artist of renown, holds several 
scholarships, including the Women* s Club Scholarship and Vanderlip 
Traveling Scholarship from Minneapolis i Minnesota, and the Bernays 
Scholarship from the Art Students League in New York, 

His works have been featured in group shows in Minneapolis, St. 
Paul, and Duluth, Minnesota* In 1946 he gave an individual showing at 
the Ashby Gallery in New York City« The same year his paintings were 
included in the Pepsin-Cola Paintings of the Year, and he was awarded 
first prize in the New York Critics 1 Show* 

In 1.947 his paintings were exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy 
Annuals,* Corcoran Art Gallery Biennial at Washington* D*C»* Whitney 
Museum Annual in New York City, and the Rcckport Art Association in 
Rockportj Massachusetts. 

Mr, Morrison was born in Grand Maraisy Minnesota; He studies at 
the Minneapolis Art Institute and the Art Students League in New York 
City* At the present time he is an instructor at C a pe Ann Art School 
at Rockport, Massachusetts* 

Mr* Morrison is a member of the Ojibwa tribe of American Indians 

of Northern Minnesota. His drawings show surprisingly little influence 

of his early environment, Ervin pointed out* Morrison's work is 

essentially mystic in approach* being concerned largely with the 

transmission of emotion through delicate tonal nuances. His figure 

drawings are notable for their unusual strength and savagery of 

conception, combined with a sureness of control of the graphic medium* 

One of Mr, Morrison* s paintings is included in the current annual 
exhibition of the Whitney Museum of New York City* a^ Comprehensive 
showing of contemporary American art trends* The painting, ( entitled 
"Subjugation," is reproduced in a recent issue of the P£t Digest* 

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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ,- - ,„ .■■■■■■■i ■ , ' 






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1-9-46 '* 

Carbondale, 111*., Jan 4 - k series of lectures and forums on 
world affairs will be launched Jan* 15 at Southern Illinois University 
under the joint sponsorship of the Independent Student Union and 
the Student Christian Foundation, 

The forums will be held each Thursday evening in the Little 
Theatre at 7 p» m. , and will be open to the general public,. 

Lectures will be given by University faculty members, followed by 
discussions chaired by students* 

The series includes the following speakers and discussions: 

Jan, 15— Dr. Willis G f Swartz , professor of government and 
chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee, "The Jewish-Arab Partition 
of Palestine ." Bill Burns of Chicago, student chairman ,. 

Feb* 5 — Dr* Frank L e Klingberg, associate professor of government^ 
"The Marshall Plan for Europe," Student chairman, Louis Waters of 
East St. Louis* 

Feb* 12~- Dr e H enry J* Rehn, dean, College of Vacations and 
Professions, "Peace for Japan*" Student chairman, Vernie Barnett of 
Metropolis* 

Feb,, 19— Dr. Lewis A. Maverick, professor and chairman of the 
economics department, "The Communist Threat,," Student chairman, Evan 
Hill of Marion* 

Feb* 26— *Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of government , "Universal 
Military Training." Student Chairman, Bob Winegarner of Marissa* 

m 

Carbondale, 111,, Jan* - T w o student organizations at Southern 
Illinois University will present a young French woman, Miss Simone 
Courbot, in a public lecture Tuesday evening; Jan* 13, at 8 p. m>^ in 
Main Building 301, 

Miss Courbot will speak on "School Life During the War Years 
and at the Present Time;" The public is invited. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service 

lorena drummond.ed. m^^tm^^^^maam^^mmm^m^^^m ■*!! 



1-9-48 

Carbondale$ 111.) Jan^ - National recognition for the music 
department at Southern Illinois University has come from the National 
Association of Schools of Music, University President Chester F. Lay 
has announced. 

The association, which held its annual meeting in Boston during 
the Christmas holidays, has elected the University music department 
to associate membership, following a two^day inspection by an 
association committee. 

The music department has been reorganized during the p<ast year and 
a half by Dr„ Maurits Kesnar, professor and department chairman, and 
Dr. Henry J, Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions* 
Dr. Kesnar came to Southern in the fall of 1946 from Augustana College, 
and has had a wide experience as a professional musician and conductor 
in both Europe and the United States* 

A new professional degree of Bachelor of Music has been established 
in the College of Vocations and Professions, and the teacher-education 
degree, Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in music, in the 
College of Education, has been strengthened* 

During the recent inspection, every student majoring in music 
performed for the NASM committee, and the courses of study for the 
two degrees were carefully studied,, 

Southern is the only state school in Illinois besides the 
University of Illinois which has been admitted to membership in the 
association, although a number of private and professional institutions 
or conservatories in the state belong. 

"This is another step in Southern's march toward the development 
of an outstanding university fpr Southern Illinois," President Lay 
said, "and we are gratified that our music curriculum has been able to 
pass the e xacting standards of this rating agency in the field of 
professional music education. 

"Both Dr» Kesnar and Dean Rehn have my warmest congratulations 

for successfully achieving such a record in so short a time. 

"Music is a luxury that is available to everybody, and I will^ 
continue %q support to thw fullest all means of providing good music 
for our students and in our area." 



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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^■^■^^■^^■■^^^■■i^^^^^^^^^^ 1 !! 

— I. ■■■■■!■ I. !■■ I ■■■!■!■■■ — I. 



Carbondale, 111., Jan^ - National recognition for the music 
department at Southern Illinois University has come from the National 
Association of Schools of Music, University President Chester F. Lay 
has announced, 

The association, which held its annual meeting in Boston during 
the Christmas holidays, has elected the University music department 
to associate membership, following a two^day inspection by an 
association committee. 

The music department has been reorganized during the p^st year and 
a half by Dr« Mauri ts Kesnar, professor and department chairman, and 
Dr.. Henry J, Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions* 
Dr. Kesnar came to Southern in the fall of 1946 from Augustana College, 
and has had a wide experience as a professional musician and conductor 
in both Europe and the United States* 

A new professional degree of Bachelor of Music has been established 
in the College of Vocations and Professions , and the teacher-education 
degree, Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in music, in the 
College of Education, has been strengthened* 

During the recent inspection, every student majoring in music 
performed for the NASM committee, and the courses of study for the 
two degrees were carefully studied «, 

Southern is the only state school in Illinois besides the 
University of Illinois which has been admitted to membership in the 
association, although a number of private and professional institutions 
or conservatories in the state belong. 

"This is another step in Southern 1 s march toward the development 
of an outstanding university fpr Southern Illinois," President Lay 
said, "and we are gratified that our music curriculum has been able to 
pass the e xacting standards of this rating agency in the field of 
professional music education. 

"Both Dr. Kesnar and Dean Rehn have my warmest congratulations 

for successfully achieving such a record in so short a time. 

"Music is a luxury that is available to everybody, and I Will 
continue %q support to thw fullest ail means of providing good music 
for our students and in our area." 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — — — — ■■■■■"■■■ "^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. -^m^^^^^^^^^^^!^ 



Attention: Sports Editors l-13-4# 

For Wednesday afternoon release: 

Carbondale, 111*, Jan* 14 - Tonight the Southern Illinois 
University Maroons open the 194$ athletic season when they play host 
to the Indians of Gape Girardeau at 8? 15 in the Southern gymnasium* 

The Maroons already hold two victories over the Cape five* In 
December Southern topped Cape 54 to 45 on the Cape flo^r in a game 
featured by rough play* New Year's Day a wider margin was established 
when the Holdermen won 63 to 43 in the first round of the Vincennes 
Holiday Tournament , 

Cape f s team is paced by their classy , hot shooting forward Upton 
and Bill McGeehan, six feet five inch sophomore center* A third 
outstanding member of the Cape quintet is Jack Klosterman, a Centralia 
product. 

Southern forward Joe Hughes of West Frankfort holds the individual 
game scoring mark against Cape thi-s year. His 17«*point effort in the 
Vincennes tournament is closely followed by the 3£ points that Jack 
Eadie, also of West Frankfort, pounded through on the Cape floor earlier, 

Southern Coach Lynn Holder will probably stick, to his regular 
starting lineup with Bob Colborn of Flora and Hughes at the forwards, 
'.• iptain Quentin Stinson of Eldorado at center, and Ollie Shoaff and 
Sadie at the guard slots. 



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Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



1-13-48 

Carbondale, 111,, Jan. - A debate on "Federal World Government" 
will be presented by Southern Illinois University Jan. 29 with Ely 
Culbertson, advocate of a federal world government plan, arguing with 
Mark Van Doren, Columbia University professor and well-known lecturer 
and poet* 

The debate will be sponsored by the University lectures and 
entertainment committee, and will be open to the public. 

Announcements of the discussion have gone to Southern Illinois 
civic groups such as chambers of commerce, Lions and Rotary clubs, to 
women's organizations such as women's clubs, League of Women Voters, 
American Association of University Women, and others* 

Culbertson, best known as inventor of the "Culbertson system" of 
contract bridge, turned his attention even before World "ar II to 
world problems, and organized a Citizens Committee for United Nations 
Reform t0 develop a "grass roots 1 ' program for a "Total Peace" and a 
"Quota Force Plan for World Peace." 

Van Doren, a graduate of the University of Illinois, has been on. 
the faculty of Columbia University since 1920. He served as literary 
editor of The Nation from 1924 to 192$, and as movie editor of the 
•".me publication from 1933 tp 193$. He has published several volumes 
of poetry, including Collected Poems in 1939 which won the Pulitzer 
poetry prize. He is also the author of The Noble Voice , 1946, a book 
">,■! criticism. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



'III 



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1-13-48 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Southern Illinois University sent 
teachers to 6$ counties of Illinois and to ten other states during 
194.6-47, according to the annual report of Raymond H, Dey, director 
of the Placements Service. 

The Placement Service secured positions for 510 applicants 
during the period Dec. 1, 1946-Oct, 31, 1947, Dey reported. 

Analyzing the location of 334 jobs secured for applicants going 
into teaching positions, Dey found 25 accepted positions outside 
Illinois, as follows: six in Missouri, four in Indiana, two each in 
California, Colorado, Kentucky, Washington D.C., Hav/aii, and one each 
in Florida, Iowa, Michigan, New Mexico, and Utah. 

Southern sent teachers to the following counties of Illinois: 

Bond, 2; Bureau, 1; Champaign, 5; Christian, 1; Clark, 2; Clay, 5; 
Clinton, 2; Coles, 2; Crawford, 3; Cook, 9; Cumberland, 1; DeWitte, 1; 
Du Page, 1; Edwards, 1; Effingham, 4; Ford, 3; Franklin, 21; Fulton, 3; 
Gallatin, 4; Hamilton, 2; Hancock, 1; Henry, 2; Iroquois, 2; and 
Jackson, 31 ♦ 

Jefferson, 5; Johnson, 6; Jersey, 1; Kane, 2; Kendall, 3; La Salle, 
.C , Lawrence, 1; Lake, 1; Macon, 7; Macoupin, 3; Madison, 13; Marion, 
' "j . Massac, 3; McDonough. 1; McHenry, 2; McLean, 2; Menard, 1; 
■'■'Lvicgomery, 3; Morgan, 1; Ogle, 3; Perry, 8; Piatt, 1; Pulaski, 3; 
"v.jiia, 3; Pope, 1; Randolph, 10; Rock Island, 1; Richland, 2; and 
• , : :' he, 12, 

Sangamon, 1; Schuy±er, 2;St. Clair, 19; Stevenson, 1; Shelby, 2; 
i. 1 --.jewell, 2; Union, 12; Vermilion, 4; '-/abash, 2; Washington, 3; 
tf-iyne, 7; Whiteside, 1; White, 4; Will, 1; Williamson, 19; and 
W-.>^dford, 1. 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^gg^^^^^^g^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 1-19-4& 

Carbondale, 111*, Jan* - Southern Illinois University's red- 
hot Maroons are currently in undisputed possession of first place in 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title race after 
defeating the powerful Panthers of Eastern Illinois State College 5& 
to 54 last Saturday at Charleston* 

The Holder men return to the home court Tuesday night when they 
play host to Arkansas State Collage in a return engagement scheduled 
for $:15 p«m» Previously., Southern defeated Arkansas State 47 to 37 
at Jonesboro, 

In the previous game with Arkansas State, Bob Colborn of Flora 
turned in an outstanding job while gathering 14 points to help contribute 
to his place as the team^s leading scorer,, 

Outstanding star of the Arkansas State crew is Benny Wilhelm, a 
Taylorville, Illinois, product who has been a consistent three-year star. 

Against Eastern in the vital I. I. A. C game last Saturday, guard 
Jack Eadie of West Frankfort turned in another brilliant performance,. 
Eadie pounded in 21 points to continue his drive toward a position high 
among the leaguers scoring leaders 9 

Ollie Shoaff of Mt # Carmel contributed 14 essential markers j and 
the rest of the scoring was divided fairly evenly between Colborn^ 
Joe Hughes of V T est Frankfort, and Captain Quentin Stinson of Eldorado* 

The Arkansas State „game Tuesday night is the first of a five-game 
home st and extending to February 7, ^nd including the following contests: 

Jan, 24, Western Illinois State College: Jan c 29, Indiana Central; 
Jan, 31 i Illinois State Normal University; and Feb. 7 ? Northern 
Illinois State Teachers College. 



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__^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — ^-^— — ^ i^^-^— University 

Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. K^MSH^wiaaKB^^ni^MKt^^w 



1-19-43 

Carbondale, 111*, Jan. • •*- A -"mountain monologist,"" Miss Irene 
Bewley, will be presented at Southern Illinois University Thursday 
evening, , Jan. 22, in her original "Smoky Mountain Character Sketches, " 

Sponsored by the University lectures and entertainment committee, 
Miss Bewley 9 s performance will be given in Shryock Auditorium at B p-»m« 

A native of the Eastern Tennessee Hills, Miss Bewley has written 
a series of character sketches about the people whom she has known 
all her life. 

"If Chaucer and Shakespeare should come back to life," she says, 
"they would feel more at home in our Southern Mountains than anywhere 
else , 

"Suppose, for instance., Chaucer were to pass by a mountain home 
and overhear a man say 'I don't aim to buy that wagon till I ? ve seed it, 
Hit don't pay to buy a pi ft in a poke," he would, I think T pull,%p a 
cheer- 1 and feel at home.. He'd recognize his own words." 

Miss Bewley' s performance will be open to the public without 
charge* 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. a^waQMHBHMfDHBaaBHBBHnaHi 



"III 



1- 21-43 

Carbondale,. Ill. r Jan* ■ - An urgent request that additional 
personnel, facilities and funds be allotted to Southern Illinois 
University for further e xpansion of its horticultural program was 
voiced here this week by the Southern Illinois Horticultural Society ,- 
in a resolution adopted at the conclusion of its two-day meeting on 
the University campus «... 

a second resolution called upon the University to undertake 
research on marketing problems of the Illinois peach industry* ."* 

The resolutions, were submitted by a committee composed of W* B* 
Valentine of Alto Fass, D. P. Dell of Grafton,. 'Alson A, Myers of Kell, 
C* J,. ; Thomas of Carbondale , and Harvey Hartline of Carbondale, the 
association's secretary treasurer* '-• 

The resolution calling on the Governor ? . the University president,- 
I,.c) bne Teacher-s College Board to provide greater financial support for 
..- p •■".'.''; .on of the University's horticultural work follows; 

:r He it resolved that this organization.,.- the Southern Illinois 
Horticultural Society, go on record as recognizing the following facts 
and making the following requests:- 

"First,, the fact that horticulture in the State of Illinois is 

centered in the south third, of the area of this State; secondly > that 

- 
there have been changes in the status of the institution now known as 

Southern Illinois University , from that of a Teachers College to that 

of a University.. 

"Therefore ,. we recognize that the lack of personnel and facilities 
at Southern Illinois University make impossible the adequate teaching 
of students in horticulture and extension services to the horticultural 
interests of Southern Illinois... 

"Therefore,, we, .the members of this Society request of Governor 
Green, President Lay,, and the Teachers College Board that additional 
personnel, facilities, and funds be alloted to Southern Illinois 
University for further expansion of this university's Horticultural 
Department. . This expansion will make possible better teaching of 

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horticulture to many young people living in this area of horticulture, 
but unable to attend school elsewhere, but desiring a horticultural 
education, and making possible better and more extensive services to 
the Horticultural interests of this fruit and vegetable producing area., 

"Therefore, this expansion will also make possible ideal 
circumstances for the fuller expansion and cooperation of the 
horticulture departments of the University of Illinois and Southern 
Illinois University, ,and th© Natural History Survey which will result 
in even greater benefits to both the horticultural student and the 
fruit industry. 

"Be it further resolved that copies of this resolution be sent 
to Governor Green, President Lay, and the members of the Teachers 
College Board." 



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- 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






1-21-43 

Carbondale, 111,, Jan. - Modern education increasingly seeks to 
dramatize study for the school boy or girl, and Southern Illinois 
University is getting ready to lend a helping hand to the Southern 
Illinois schools that v/ant to bring the senses of vision, touch and 
motion into the classroom. 

The Extension Service and the University Museum is starting a 
brand new service for thiff- area by taking exhibits of museum materials 
to the schools* 

An average of a hundred school children e.xh month visit the 
Southern Museum and find an eye-opening thrill in seeing the collections 
of pioneer Southern Illinois household equipment, farm tools, profession-: 
and trade equipment,, .transportation facilities, birds, reptiles and 
other wild life. 

This new service, .according to Raymond H.Dey, director of the 
Extension Service,. aui John Allen, history curator of the Museum, will 
take the exhibits straight into the classroom, so they can serve as 
object lessons directly linked with classwork. . 

In many cases £ the traveling exhibits will be made up of models, . 
sometimes smaller than life , sometimes larger than life, .For example, . 
in the exhibit or* weaving, one real spinning wheel, .generations old, , 
will be included, but two tiny models—both of which will really spin — 
and a model loom that will actually weave will also be shown. On the 
other hand, in the exhibit on sea life, a 15-inch model of a paramecium — 
the microscopic single-cell organism, too tiny to be seen with the 
naked eye — will illustrate the internall mechanism of the one cell, - 

At firaa,. the University will send out only about a dozen exhibits,, 
each centralized around one activity, such as weaving, soapmaking, 
shoemaking, or candle dipping, .around the story of one industry, such 
as transportation facilities or household lighting; or around one variety 
of animal life,, such as birds, or mammals or sea life* 

If these provs successful, .other exhibits will be prepared, and 

(more) 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 1-22-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., Jan* - Southern Illinois University's league- 
leading, high-scoring Maroons play host to Western Illinois State 
College here Saturday &t #;XJ> p*m# in an Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference game. 

The Western team does not have an impressive record, but with 
players such as six-feet four-inchers Al Miksis and Bill Will and clever 
Chuck Fowler f they are both tall and dangerous. 

Entering the game, the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder boast an 
impressive scoring average of 63»5 points per game in their 14 contests. 
In addition to this high scoring of their own, they have held their 
combined opponents to an average of 4#*6 per game, a difference of 
almost 15 points an outing* 

In compiling this average, the Maroons have won 12 to only two 
defeats* These ^defeats were to Evansville and Millikin, teams the 
Maroons had previously defeated, in successive games which comprised a 
mid- season slump. 

Since losing their last game* the Holder men have won four in a 
row and are no^ trying to match the eight consecutive victories with 
which they started the season. 

Hold 3i" has indicated that the regular starting five will again 
open the game with Bob Colborn of Flora and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort 
as forward s j C.uentin Stinson of Eldorado at center, and Ollie Shoaff of 
Mt» Carmel and Jack Eadie of West Frankfort ( as guards* 

Of this team, Eadie holds the best average with 154 points in 12 
games, while Colborn is leading scorer wlfch W points in 14 games^ 









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m ^ m ^^^^^^^^^^^ a ^ mi ^^— Southern Illinois 

^— ■——■—■—— i™««i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^— 



1-23-43 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - A delegation of educators from Ball 
State Teachers College, Muncie, Indl, will visit Southern Illinois 
University Feb., 25-26, to observe the University T s health education 
program in operation, President Chester F, Lay has been informed by 
Ray 0. Duncan, Illinois State director of health, physical education 
and safety a 

The Indiana group is interested in Southern's set-up of a Universit 
Health Council and field coordinator, Duncan wrote 

"I believe that we should feel somewhat honored to ha\ e people 
from a nearby state come to visit one of our universities with the 
thought of patterning their health department after ours/' he added. 

The Indiana group will include the dean of the college, the head 
of the department of physical education, the College physician, and a 
faculty member of the science department. 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Co-eds from six colleges and 
universities of Illinois and Missouri will visit Southern Illinois 
University Saturday, Feb. 7, for a Sports Day, sponsored by the 
Women's Athletac Association and the Women's Physical Education 
u?oartment, acccrding to Dr. Dorothy Davies, department chairman. 

Girls and faculty advisers from the following schools are expected 
to ett&a&s Washington University, St. Louis; Principia College, Elsah, 
111.,, Southeast Missouri State Teachers College; Illinois State Normal 
University; Eastern Illinois State College; Western Illinois State 
Golle e. 



*h 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



l| 



1-23-4B 

Carbondale, Ill , Jan. - Competitive intercollegiate athletics 
captures almost all the newsprint and interest of the sports fans in 
Southern Illinois University a thle tic endeavors, but the little- 
heralded, little-known intramural and recreational athletics provide 
direct benefits to vastly more students a 

More than five hundred college men participate in intramural 
basket ball each week in rival leagues and on high spirited teams. 
Highly coveted is the intramural basketball championship, for which 
fraternities, independent men's houses, and other teams battle each 
year. 

Several intramural games are held each night of the week when no 
varsity contest is scheduled. Groups of small but highly vocal 
partizans lend color and interest to the contests. •** 

With the end of the winter term will come the annual intramural 
play-offs leading to the championship. In the past thes^ intramural 
championships have drawn large crowds. 

But organized basket ball is not the only winter-time recreational 
activity provided by the Southern athletic department. Activities 
are available for everyone who has the desire to participate. At all 
hours of the da;; the men's dressing rooms are crowded with men playing 
ping-pong(a streni:us game if well played), throwing ringers, rolling 
softballs at duck pins in an improvised bowling alley, and many other 
impromptu activities. 

These activities provide a type of recreation which may^be carried 
on eftcr school years, and can be used as a basis for a life-long 
program of sane, healthful recreation, according to Athletic Director 
blenn "Abe" Martin and his staff. 

In &n effort to provide bettor recreational facilities, the 
gymnasium has been made available each Saturday and Sunday afternoon 
from two to five o* clock. 






### 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



'I 



1-23-43 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - As part of a statewide movement to 
inform public school teachers about conservation of soil, forests and 
water supply, Southern Illinois University will hold a series of 11 
one-week workshops in this area next August, Raymond H. Dey, director 
of the Extension Service, has announced* 

This statewide plan was evolved in 1946, but Southern was the 
first college or university to offer work of this type, Dey said. In 
the summer of 1936, Southern held three conservation workshops, one at 
Vienna, one at Belleville and the third at Chester. 

Last summer, 13 such courses were held by other institutions ,. but 
Southern did not participate because of lack of staff, Dey explained.. 

During the summer of 194$, however, staff members from the 
Southern geography and agriculture departments jointly will conduct 
eleven workshops in the following areas of Southern Illinois: Aug.. 
9-13, Hamilton, Marion, White and Jackson counties; Aug. 16-20, Union, 
Massac, Jefferson and Hardin counties; Aug. 2 3-27, Perry, Washington 
and Monroe counties, 

Dey and Willis Mai one , acting assistant to the dean of the College 
of Education, recently attended a meeting in Springfield, called by 
the State Suoc-ri iCwndent* of Public Instruction to discuss the proposed 
>/"'. kshops , Among; the agencies participating w ere representatives of 
blip, six state-supported colleges and universities , the Federal Soil 
Conservation Service, and the Cook County Forest Preserve., as well as 
bhc State Superintendent's Office. 



I 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Attention-; Sports Editors l-*26~4# 

Carbondale 9 Iil« , Jan* - The Southern Illinois University- 
Maroons, fresh from a* victory over Mest&rn Illinois .State College last 
Saturday s 73 to 53 3 continue their home stand this week with games 
against Indiana Central Thursday and Illinois State Normal University 
Saturday* 

The latter game, against Normal, will be an Illinois Intercollegiat 
Athletic Conference contest with, the league^leading Maroons seeking 
their fourth straight win,, Normal started the season slowly with a 
poor record, but recently the team has shown marked improvement, 
dropping Western in a recent upsets 

Indiana Central is a new addition to the Southern schedule * this 
being the first time Southern has met the Indianapolis cagers„, 

In marking up their third straight in the I. I, a e C, by topping 
Western, forward Bob Colborn of Flara regained his high«scoring ways 
by contributing 23 points to the Maroon victory, Short Ollie Shoaff 
of Mt, Carniel found the sky-scraping Western team very little trouble 
and added 15 points. 

Jack Eadie of Vest Frankfort experienced what is for him an off 
night, getting only nine points, but Colborn T s fine effort took up the 
scoring slack* 

Captain Quentin Stinson of Eldorado continued his expert rebounding 
and floor play } and was ably relieved by Jack Long of Flora* 

Although the scoii*e was close most ox the way, Southern managed to 
establish and maintain a constant lead of eight to ten points,. The 
half-time score was 31 to 1A* 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — ^^^^^^^"^— ^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. KH^n^na^g^nB^^ 



1-26-48 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Approximately 40 Southern Illinoisans 
interested in art gathered at Southern Illinois University Jan. 25 to 
form the Southern Illinois Art association. 

The group proposes to sponsor classes, both at the University and 
elsewhere, in painting, ceramics, sculpture and other art activities; 
community art activities; annual exhibits of Southern Illinois and other 
art works; lectures and clinics. The group will lend support to the 
University's art curriculum, and will cooperate in developing extension 
classes in art, and will work with the public school art program. 

Development of a permanent collection of art, through purchases, 
prizes and gifts, to be circulated among schools, clubs and other 
organized groups, is being considered. 

A committee was appointed to draft a proposed constitution and 
to prepare a slate of nominees for office in the association. This 
committee, composed of Don Morris of Marion, chairman, Dr. Archibald 
McLeod, Raymond Dey, and Emily Farnham, all of the University faculty, 
and Jack Batts, sculptor of Johnston City and West Frankfort, is to 
report at the next meeting of the group, to be held some time before 
March 1. 

Kappa Pi, art fraternity at the University, served tea at the 
conclusion of the meeting. 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. - An exhibit of paintings and other art 
executed by Southern Illinois University students and faculty is currewti, 
on exhibit at Cairo, under sponsorship of the Cairo Women* s Club, 

Work being shown was done by Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the 
art department, and the following students: Ralph Myers of Grand 
Chain, Don Morris of Marion, Norma Lee Henderson of Carbondale; Doris 
Morgan of Sparta, G e orge Russell of Alto Pass, Eloise McCoy of Herrin, 
Mary Ann Mines of DeSoto, Clarence Ball of Carbondale, Kin Jitodai of 
Seattle, Wash., Marvin Mullinix of DeSoto, Jane Wallace of Marion, and 
Bill Ferketich of Zeigler. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






1-26-48 

Carbondale, 111., Jan, - Since Ely Culbertson, noted proponent 
of a "Total Peace" plan, has been called to Washington to appear before 
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Friday morning at 10 a. m, , his 
debate here at Southern Illinois University with Mark Van Doren on 
Thursday evening, Jan. 2.9, has been moved up to 7:30 P« m. 

The Culbertson-Van Doren debate on "Federal World Government," 
open to the public, wt thout charge, will be held in Shryock Auditorium 
on the University .campus, according to Dr. P. M. Larson, chairman of 
the University lectures and entertainment committee. 

Mr. Culbertson will take the Panama Limited from Carbondale to 
Memphis and fly from there, to Washington, Dr. Larson explained. 

Culbertson, widely known as a contract bridge authority, has 
devoted much of his time in recent years to lecturing on his plan for 
world peace and a "Quota Force" plan. Van Doren, Columbia University 
professor, is a well known poet, author and lecturer. 

Special guests of the University for the lecture will be some 200 
college speech students from Illinois and several other states who will 
participate in the second annual College Speech Festival here on the 
campus on Friday and Saturday. 

m 









Carbondale, 111., Jan. - a daily chapel service is being held 
five days a week for Southern Illinois University students by the 
Baptist Foundation at its chapel across the street from the University 
campus. The service is conducted Monday through Friday from 12:35 to 
12:50 p.m. 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1-27-43 

Carbondale, 111*, Jan. - Appointment of three laboratory 
assistants for Southern Illinois University 1 s new biological sciences 
research laboratory has been announced by President Chester F« Lay. 

Mrs. Gertrude Lindegren, wife and collaboratory of Dr. Carl C , 
Lindegren, laboratory director, Mrs. Joseph S, Rafalko^ and Miss Bessie 
Kawachi have all been appointed faculty assistants to work with Dr. 
Lindegren in his experiments in microbiology, 

Mrs, Rafal&Q is also a faculty wife, b eing the wife of Dr. Rafalko, 
associate professor of zoology. Miss Kawachi, who has had two years* 
training in chemistry worked with Dr„. Lindegren at Washington University 
in St* Louis before he came to Southern Jan^ 1* 

Mrs* Lindegren has hud 24 years laboratory experience in research 
on the genetics of microorganisms, and is co-author witn her husband 
of some 30 articles for scientific publications on this subject , 

Mrs. Rafalko has completed work for the master's decree and has 
had two years' laboratory experience in biological science and research. 
She also formerly worked with Dr. Lindegren, 

The new biological sciences laboratory is Southern's first major 
venture into research, Dr ? Lindegren, ary internationally known 
geneticist, is engaged in investigations into the nature of the yeast 
cell. His work is supported in part by grants from several foundations, 
and industries, including the U< S. Public Health Service, the American 
Cancer Society, and the Anheuser-Busch Company » 

I #» 

Carbondale, 111,, Jan, - Mrs. Sarah Gertrude Knott, director 
of the National Folklore Festival, will be a visitor at Southern Illinoi 
University Thursday, Jan, 29, John Allen, University Museum curator 
and president of the Southern Illinois Folklore Society, has announced* 

An informal luncheon will be held at the University Cafeteria at 
noon, at which those interested in folkiore may meet Mrs„ Knott, 
Allen said, 

§#§ 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



m 



1-27-48 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Indiana Central will provide a 
breather in the Southern Illinois University Maroons campaign far their 
third straight Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Title when 
the two teams meet in the Maroon 1 s gymnasium Thursday night at 8:15 p.m. 

The Greyhounds from Indianapolis boast a record of eight wins 
against four defeats ana should provide sharp competition upon which the 
Maroons can sharpen their attack in preparation for the invasion of 
Illinois State Normal University Saturday night for an I, I. A. C. game. 

With a serious lack of height in their lineup , the Indiana quintet 
is expected to play "race-house" basketball, depending upon eight 
lettermen to keep a speedy attack rolling up and down the floor. 

In constrast to Indiana Centrales record, the Maroons now boast a 
season's record of 13 wins and two losses, and are now riding the crest 
of a five game winning streak. The Maroons opened the season with eight 
consecutive wins before losing their only games in succession. 

According to the Jan. 17 release of official statistics of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, Southern is ninth in the nation 
among small colleges in offence with a per-game average of 63.2. Since 
that time, the Maroons have won two games, scoring over 70 in each of 
them. 

Coach Lynn Holder plans to stick by his regular lineup, with Bob 
Colborn of Flora and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, forwards, Quentin 
Stinson of Eldorado, center, and Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel and Jack 
Eadie of West Frankfort, guards. 









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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— - — ^^— ™^^— ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^^-^-ggnB-^^M^^M^ra^^^^ 



n 









1-23-48 

Carbondale, 111., Jan, - Talk will be the order of the day here 
Friday and Saturday of this week as 120 collegians gather for the 
second annual Egyptian Speech Festival, sponsored by the speech 
department of Southern Illinois University. 

Entries have been received from 19 colleges and universities of 
Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Kentucky, and Indiana, according to Dr. P^ 
Merville Larson, department chairman* 

The speech festival participants will be special guests at the 
Ely Culbertson-Mark Van Doren debate on "Federal World Government" 
at 7**30 p* m, Thursday evening in Shryock Auditorium on the University 
campus o 

Events scheduled for the two-day festival includes original 
oratory, poetry reading, oratorical declamation, dramatic reading, 
radio newscasting, folk-lore telling, after-dinner speaking, 
extemporaneous speaking, group discussion, and debate , 

Advance registration includes the following delegations; North 
Park College, Chicago, 4 delegates; Knox College, C-alesburg, Ill«<, 6; 
Evansville College, Evansville, Ind, , 4; Illinois State Normal 
University, Normal, 111*, 5i£ Burlington Junior College, Burlington, 
Iowa, 6; Northern Illinois State College, DeKalb, 111*, 5 J Southwest 
Baptist College, Bolivar, Mo»; Wheaton College, Wheaton, 111,, 4j 
Principia College, Elsah, 111*, 6; Murray State College, Murray, Ky. , #j 
huincy College, Quincy, 111*, 4; Illinois College, Jacksonville, Ill», 
5; Eastern Illinois State College, Charleston, 111*, #; Bradley 
University, Peoria, 111., 10; Eureka College , Eureka, Ill», #5 Iowa 
State College, Cedar Falls, Iowa, 5 Warrensburg College, Warrensburg, 
Mo,, 8) Greenville College, Greenville, 111,, 10; and William Jewell 
College, Liberty, M«», 4» 









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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ulliyi WHIH(ll»ll ■illlilllBIIHIHII|i|ll HHMHIWII 



1-29-4^ 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. 29 - The "new civilization" is going to 
sweep before it many of the traditions of the past, unless a conscious 
effort is made to preserve the folk songs, music and dances of the past, 
Miss Sarah Gertrude Knott, founder and director of the National Folk 
Festival, told a group of Southern Illinois University f acuity here 
today. 

Miss Knott, en route to Paducah, Ky . , for a joint meeting Friday 
of music and other clubs to discuss regional folklore, stODped here to 
have a lundheon conference with officers of the new Illinois Folklore 
Society, which has its headquarters here at the University, and others 
interested in the folklore movement. 

She described the founding of the National Folk Festival 14 years 
ago, and said that groups from some 25 states would present folk songs, 
music and dancing at the national festival this year, to be held in 
St. Louis April 7-10. 

She stressed the democratic nature of the American folk festival 
movement, which depends entirely on voluntary participation, in contrast 
to the movements in many European countries, which have been highly 
nationalistic in nature and often have been at least partly government- 
subsidized. 

"Of course the real be sis for the movement is the fun which the 
participants get out of singing and dancing and playing music," she 
declared. 

"But folk festivals bring together people re-enacting the folkways 
and folksongs of the varied nationalities which go to make up our 
American people — Indian, Spanish-American, English, German, French, 
Czechoslovakian and othera--and such regional g roups as cowbeys , miners, 
lumberjacks, cotton pickers, levee workers. 

"In this way we help to bring about an appreciation for the many 
facets of our American culture, and a better understanding of the culture 
of other countries." 

She urged the development of Southern Illinois folk festivals, as 
a means of preserving the wide range of t raditions represented by the 
people of this area. §f# 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1-29-48 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Seventy-one new films ranging from 
an animated cartoon explanation of atomic energy to a movie of kittens 
at play have been added to the film library of Southern Illinois 
University's Audio-Visual Education Service, Donald A. Ingli, director, 
has announced. 

Many of the new films depend on animated drawings to reduce 
complicated ideas to a visual pattern that is easily grasred. Such 
subjects as colloids-particles in matter which cause it to jell, as in 
gelatin, starches, albumin, etc. --are clarified by "moving" pen and 
ink sketches, 

Ground water, soil resources, property taxation, the teeth, chemicsl 
reactions are all demonstrated at least partially by animated drawings. 

Films to dramatize certain skills, vocations and professions are 
numerous among the University's new offerings. These include movies of 
the cattleman, showing the ranch family and the hired hands at mealtime, 
repairing fences, herding cattle, marketing, breaking horses, round-up, 
and shipping; the corn farmer; the mailman; the doctor; the secretary; 
the mural painter; the orange grower; the policeman; the fi^esRStt: t]$e 
puppeteer; and the tugboat crew. 

Other films follow a mother and d aught er on an airplane trip; tell 
children how to take care of pets*, accompany three farm youngsters on a 
jaunt to the fair; tell the story of two city children who spend the 
summer on the farm; show how to use a bank; describe how to avoid a 
cold; demonstrate bow to use a dictionary and how to use a library, 

A series of films about children of various countries has been 
secured, including children of China, Holland, Japan, Switzerland, 
Mexico, Hawaii, Eskimo children, and French-Canadian children. 

One film by animated drawings and photograrhy presents the nature 
and meaning of democracy, while another defines and illustrates 
despotism, presenting the thesis that all coummunities c an be ranged en 
a scale running from democracy to despotism, and showing the conditions 
that give rise to despotism. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



n 



1-29-43 

Austin, Texas, Jan. - An intramural one-act play contest fcr 
all student organizations at Southern Illinois University will be 
conducted in February by the Little Theatre, Br. Archibald McLeod, 
director of the student dramatic grour, has announced. 

Nine student groups, including fraternities, the women's dormitory, 
several independent houses and the Student Christian Foundation, have 
indicated they will enter the prelim^naT^^fe,, Feb. 11, 13 and 16. Final; 
will be held Feb. 13 . 

Medals will be presented to the outstanding actor, the outstanding 
actress, and to members of the cast of the winning play. A traveling 
trophy goes to the group presenting the winning play. 

m 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. - D r . Howard E, Bosley, associ£te 
professor of education at Southern Illinois University, has been invited 
to assist two Southern Illinois school systems in their local development 
programs . 

He has been asked by the board of education of the Mercer School 
District in Marion County to serve as educational consultant in the 
planning of a new 4-300,000 school building. 

Supt . H, V. Koelling of the Red Bud Community Schools has invited 
Dr. Bosley to direct the organization of an improved reading program in 
the 12 grades of that system, 

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H . 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1-30-48 

Carbondale,. 111., Jan, - Dr. Carl C. Lindegren, director of 
Southern Illinois University's new biological science research 
laboratory, has been invited by the French government to participate 
in the Seventh International Congress of Agricultural Industries in 
Paris July 12-18. 

Theme of the congress, to be conducted by the Commission 
Internationale des Industries Agricoles, will be "hybridization of 
yeasts," a field in which Dr. Lindegren is an internationally known 
specialist . 

Dr. and Mrs. Lindegren, who assists him in the laboratory here, 
had already made arrangements to participate in the Eighth Internationa] 
Genetics Congress in Stockholm, Sweden July 7-14, but hope to be able 
to reach Paris for at least part of the agricultural congress. They 
also will attend the International Zoological Congress in Paris July 
21-27* 

It was part of the University's arrangement with Dr. Lindegren 
when he joined the University faculty Jan. 1 of this year that he would 
be able to attend such scientific congresses held outside this country, 

m 



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Carbondale, 111., Jan. - Check for 4>1$,000 has been received 
by Southern Illinois University from Anheuser-Busch, Inc., as that 
company's contribution to research projects carried on by Dr, Carl C. 
Lindegren, director of the University r s new biological science research 
laboratory, University President Chester F. Lay h as announced. 

The company has supported Dr. Lindegren' s research in baking 
yeasts as a source of nutrients for a number of ytars, while he has 
been on the staff of Washington University, and will continue to aid 
his work by grants to Southern, 

### 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 
For Saturday release: 



1-30-43 



Carbondale, 111., Jan- 31, The Southern Illinois University Maroons 
continue their campaign for their third straight Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference championship Saturday night when they play host to 
Illinois State Normal University at $:15 in the Southern gymnasium. 

Thursday night Southern had its hardest home game of the season as 
Indiana Central battled the Maroons right down to the final gun before 
submitting 76 to 69. This win was the sixth straight in Southern's 
current winning streak, and brought the season's record to 14 wins 
against t wo losses. 

Brilliant Bob Gslborn of Flora continuedhis high scoring for 
Southern by counting 21 points on nine field goals and three free 
throws, brings his season's total to 210 points, an average of over 13 
points per ^ame . 

Joe Hughes, Colborn's running mate at forward, turned in one of his 
best scoring performances of the season with 16 points, eight of them 
coming on free throws. He missed only one free toss. 

The Indiana Central team gave Southern a height advantage, but 
played great, colorful basketball. Scrapping all the way, never giving 
up, the courageous little team fought on even terms with Southern all 
the way except for four- minutes at the beginning of the second half, 
when the Maroons scored 10 quick points to take a lead they never 
relinquished. 

The Indiana team's classy guard, McBride, provided many thrills on 
his accurate, high-arched, one-handers from near the middle of the 
court. Another Indiana standout was Swailes, six feet three inch center 
who rebounded effectively and scored 15 points. 

Southern Coach Lynn Holder has indicated he will continue with his 
regular starting lineup against Normal which includes Jack Eadie and 
Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, Cuentin Stinson of Eldorado, Ollie Shoaff 
of Mt. Carmel, and Bob Colborn, the Flora flash. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



'I 



1-30-43 

Carbondale , 111., Jan. 30- Agreeing that some form of world 
government is both desirable and necessary, Ely Culbertson and Mark 
Van Doren disagreed on the form of federation that is feasible in a 
debate on "Federal World Government" here last night at Southern 
Illinois University. 

Van Doren, Columbia University professor and noted poet and critic, 
advocated a world federation modeled s omewhat on the United States 
system, with world citizenship as well as national citizenship, and 
with federal powers to control aggression. 

Culbertson, world-famous bridge expert and widely-known "social 
engineer," as he termed himself, declared Van Doren' s concept--"like 
that of most f ederalists--is based on "noble generalities," and 
unattainable for at least 150 years. 

His own plan, backed by such divergent individuals and groups as 
Norman Thomas, perennial Socialist presidential candidate, and the 
American Legion, would leave the individual countries autonomous 
except in the control of aggression. 

This "quota force" plan would revamp the United Nations to 
strengthen its police powers so that it could proceed against 
individual citizens fomenting war as well as against aggressor nations. 
It would set up a federal army, composed of t roops recruited from the 
smaller nations, but would leave the larger nations to continue to 
maintain their own armies, though on vastly reduced quotas. It would 
provide international control of atomic power, 

Culbertson said his plan could be put into effect immediately, "if 
possible with Russian, if not then without Russia." 

He said Russia could exercise the veto ^ower if the '-Ian were 
brought up in the United Nations, but that the other nations could 
then set up a new organization similar to the United Nations but 
embracing necessary reforms. 

"Russia would then be all dressed up and nowhere to go," he said. 

(more ) 



-2- 

"If she chose to fight, the new world federation with its federal 

army and the individual nations' armies would be ready to nut down 

the aggression, I think she would join, sooner or later," 
he 
He said/ received a telegram yesterday from "one of the two leading 

contenders for the presidency of the United States," expressing 

approval of his plan. 

He himself will appear before the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee in Washington Monday to express his views on foreign affairs 
and wo r 1 d peace. 

Van Doren declared he did not see how any system) of world 
government could function without Russia, "for we should then have two 
worlds . " 

He said that Culbertson's system assumes that the different nations 
and their statesmen would be fair, that actually it would work only so 
long as the individual nations' self-interests were not touched, 

"It would just be a temporary truce," he said. 

"I want a world government under which we can live together with 
other nations, even though we may not like their peoples or their 
governments," he declared. "I may not like my neighbor or the people 
in an adjoining section of the country, but because of our lews and 
our police force, I can get along with them without fighting, 

"There are differences between individuals and differences between 
peoples which can never be resolved, but our job is to develop some 
kind of world which can contain people who disagree. It's our 'job 
to find a world that can contain both Russia and the United States," 

Some 200 college speech students, here for the second annual Egynt 
Speech Festival, were in the audience, which also included delegations 
from many Southern Illinois towns. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-4-43 

Carbondale, 111*, Feb. -Troubled with roaches? 

Then here's advice from the State health department, as expounded 
in a red.nt lecture-demonstration at Southern Illinois University here, 

James D. Williams and E. L. Wittenborn from the Division of 
Sanitation, State Department of Public Health, were guest instructors 
and demonstrators at a short course held by the University Health 
Service and Department of Physiology and Health Education, for the 
benefit of campus employees who wage constant warfare on roaches, insect; 
and other pests which plague areas where food is handled or stored, 

Three types of roaches are most prevalent in Illinois, according 
to Mr. Williams, one of the State department speakers. They are the 
German roach, a small, brown, dingy color, which rarely travels more 
than six feet from its habitat; the American roach, long, reddish 
brown, an extensive traveler; and the Oriental roach, a black roach, 
found chiefly in basements, usually jailed the "water bug." 

Mr. Williams explained that DDT is very effective again-*- these 
roaches if it is applied correctly. The habits of these insects must be 
known if one is to wage a successful war against them, A 2% solution of 
DDT to be effective does not need to be applied directly on the insects, 
but should be applied in areas where the roach is likely to walk and 
could come in contact with the DDT crystals which crystallize out on 
the surface after application. 

For small eracks between baseboards and walls, Mr. Williams 
pointed out that a new chemical known as "cholcrdan' " could be applied 
successfully with an oil can. This chemical reacts as a fumigant and 
is fatal to any insects which might live behind the baseboard. 

The demonstrations included methods for mixing the DDT, type of 
equipment to be used, and an actual demonstration of the application of 
DDT and "Chlordane" in the Cafeteria. 

Future demonstrations on insect and rodent control will be 






(more) 



■';•;(,.;• ;.l; 



^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

■■—■■■■■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■ ini«i ■■[■■nil i mm I iimmiih — ■ 



i ' I 



A 



2-4-43 

Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Next attraction on the lecture and 
entertainment calendar at Southern Illinois University is lorn Scott s 
American ballad singer, to be presented Feb, 9* at 8:00 p«nu in 
Shryock Auditorium, 

Scott T known to radio and concert-goers as "the American Troubador, 
is a native of Kentucky, studied voice, composition and piano under 
Pwight Anderson of the University of Louisville, and continued his 
education at the University of Kentucky arid the Louisville Conservatory 
of Music, 

His chief interest has been the native songs of the Negro and the 
mountain folk. 

Joining the Fred Waring Glee Club in 1936 as a bass vocalist t he 
persuaded Waring to include folk music on the group* s programs, .and 
Scott composed two series of programs, "America, I Hear You Singing" 
and later "We Sing of a New World United," 

Scott is recognized as an authority on foik songs, and more than 
100 of his arrangements have been published and are used by qh'fcfcal 
groups * 

His performance here will be sponsored by the University lecture 
and entertainment committee, and will be open to the public without 
charge. 



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Southern Illinois 



■— — — — ^ ■■^■■h ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^a^^^^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-4-4# 

Carbondale, Illinois, Feb«, - Five home games and three away are 
on the footboll schedule for the 194$ Southern Illinois University- 
Maroons, according to Athletic Director Glenn n Abe n Martin. 

The Maroons will open their schedule against Wayne University at 
Detroit, Michigan, a school with an enrollment of about 17*000, Wayne 
is the only new school on the Southern schedule, but its presence on 
the schedule represents n step«~up in the size and caliber of Southern 1 s 
football opponents 6 

The defending Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference chaz^-ions 
complete schedule follows: 

Sept. 25, Wayne University^ at Detroit; Oct, 2, Cape Girardeau, 
here; Oct. 9> Indiana State, here; Oct* 16 ^ Western Illinois, here; 
Oct. 23, Northern Illinois, at DeKalb; Oct. 30, Arkansas State, here; 
Nov, 6, Illinois Normal University, here; and Nov. 13 y Eastern Illinois, 
at Charleston* 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■iJHUI I IWr " ■■■■■■!— —— 



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2*4*48 H< 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -With their first round-robin of 
conference games completed without a defeat, the Southern Illinois 
University Maroons are looking forward to their February schedule with 
hopes high for an undefeated record In the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference, which they have won the last two years. 

The Maroons hold a full two-game lead over second-place Eastern. 
Also, the Maroons have the advantage of having their remaining game 
against the Panthers scheduled for the Southern floor , Previously 
Southern defeated Eastern at Charleston 5$ to 54. 

The Maroons, who have remaining road games against Western and 
Normal, can afford to lose those games and still tie with Eastern for 
the championship provided Eastern receives no further defeats t and 
Southern is not defeated on the home court. Southern has been defeated 
on the S»I.U, court only once by a college team in three seasons. 

Normal and Western both provided worthy opposition before going 
down to Southern in Carbondale, and may do even better among the 
familiar surroundings of their home courts. 

Two vital conference games remain f$r the Southern gymnasium, 
Eastern and Northern, the second and third place teams in the conference 
race. Southern defeated Northern at DeKalb by only one point, 52 to 51* 

Northern's dangerous team will visit Southern Saturday night, in 
a game which will find the Maroons striving for a second win over the 
sky-scraping Huskies,, 



t » ■ ■ ' I ■ v. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale , 111., Feb. - A former Southern Illinois University- 
professor, now at Michigan State College, has developed a revolutionary 
new approach to prepare his students for their job as future teachers. 

Dr. Troy L» Stearns, who taught here at Southern from 1929 to 
1940, as director of rural education, believes student-teachers need 
to know something about the communities in which their future pupils 

« 

live . 

So he has developed a so-called "Marshall Plan," whereby his 
students leave the cam. us for 12-week expeditions into the 6,000 
population town of Marshall, Mich,, located $0 miles from the East 
Lansing campus. 

The story of this plan is told in an illustrated article, "Education 
Conducts Its Own Marshall Plan," in the Feb. 1 magazine section of the 
Chicago Sunday Sun and Times. 

Groups of 20 co-eds each term go to Marshall, "live in Marshall 
homes, eat at Marshall family dinner tables, imbibe Marshall 
neighborhood gsssip, study Marshall institutions, investigate Marshall 
living conditions, customs and social problems," the article, written 
by Ernest LaFrance, points out. 

They wait tables to gain experience as working girls, inspect 
print shops, learn how to run lathes, visit dairy farms, and some even 
spend some time in jail to help them understand delinquents. They attenc 
Rotary Club luncheons, visit rural schools, hold discussions with labor 
groups, help with PTA activities, and teach classes in the elementary 
schools* 

The "Marshall Flan" is underwritten by the Kellogg Foundation of 
Battle Creek, Mich., by means of scholarships which are available to 
the co-eds taking the course. 



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-'*% 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - The first complete collection of plants 
and trees of So*»J"hf*ro Illinois--in the botanical "cross-roads" of the 
North American continent--is being gathered at Southern Illinois 
University,,. 

A regional herbarium, first ever developed for this unique area, 
is being built up by Dr. W. hl K Bailey, professor emeritus, who retired 
to part-time service in 1946 after 32 years T teaching in the Southern 
botany d epartment , during which time he spent nearly a quarter of a 
century as department chairman. He is being assisted by Julius Swayne 
of DuQuoin, a graduate student. 

This area marks the southernmost protrusion of the glaciers, which 
swept all vegetation before them, Dr. Bailey explained. The Southernmost 
trace of the glaciers in this region is found around Cobden, a few 
miles south of Carbondale. One glacial moraine forms a ridge just 
south of the University "s.mpus , 

This narrow belt, running across the southern part of Illinois 
and perhaps extending into adjoining Missouri and Indiana, is almost 
unique in its great variety of vegetation," Dr. Bailey explains. It 
marks the greatest change in flora that is found between Chicago and 
New Orleans . . 

"Here the north and. the south, the east and the west, meet. Here 
we find the southernmost migration of northern plants and trees, the 
northernmost specimens of southern plants and trees. T - r 

In the Southern Illinois area are found some species of vegetation 
which are apparently unique in the United States, . Dr. .Bailey believes. 

He has found a minute variety of buttercup which is n.t listed 
in Illinois; an infinitesmal brownish orchid never before reported 
in Illinois; a cleft phlox, seen in German herbaria with the notation 
that it is found at Fountain Bluff, 111., and in Jackson County; the 

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harebell--otherwise seen around Lake Michigan — which is thought to be a 
sub-arctic plant, a relic of the glacial period; and a sub-arctic "club 
moss." 

Many plants and trees considered definitely Southern grow in this 
region, including a species of azalia (which Dr. Bailey says is really 
a rhododendron), the cucumber magnolia, the "tulip tree," water tupelo, 
water, elm,, water privet, willow oak, water locust, and the shortleaf 
yellow pine which bulks so large in the South' s lumber industry. 

Among the Northern species which grow in Southern Illinois are the 
black maple, prevalent in the Great Lakes region; the red oak; and the 
black willow; the sub-arctic harebell and the sub-arctic "club moss" 
mentioned above. 

Dr. Bailey and Swayne started their systematic collection in May 
of last year, and have already added many specimens to the embryo 
herbarium. 

All through the more than three decades he taught here, Dr. Bailey 
has taken his students on field trips throughout the area, and he s 
identified many species of trees, shrubs, flowers and grasses, but his 
collections have been - confined to specimens for use in botany laboratory 

Southern, however, already possesses a number of valuable botanical 
collections, including many specimens collected by Prof. G.H. French , 
second chairman of the Southern botany department, who was recognized 
as one of the best taxonomists of his day. 

Another fine collection, consisting of mosses of this region, was 
made by Miss Elizabeth Wells, 1931 graduate of Southern, now a teacher 
at Rock Island, This cdllection was left by Miss Wells with the botany 
department here . 

Another exceptionally valuable collection — ferns of Illinois--was 
gathered by the late Dr. Mary Steagall, formerly on the University 
faculty, who wrote her doctoral thesis on this subject* She also 
gathered a substantial collection of lichens which she gave to the 
University. 

Unfortunately, the French collection has suffered from inadequate 
care since he left the University about 1915, and one of the major 
tasks of Dr. Bailey and Swayne has been to salvage these specimens, 

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remount many of them, and provide proper storage for them. This 
undertaking is being carried on concurrently with their own collection. 

Development of such a regional herbarium for Southern Illinois will i,|i i 
provide a much more complete collection of specimens of this unusual **! 

area than is afforded in state and national herbaria, and will establish 
a center for botanical research that should draw both graduate students 
and botanical scholars to Southern. 

This school, which only recently has become a university, is 
developing research programs on several fronts, one of the most 
significant of which is Dr. Bailey* s work in the collection of an 
herbarium. 

Dr. Bailey estimates it will require some four or five years t 
complete his collections. He and Swayne are attempting to gather 
some half dozen specimens of each species — two for the herbarium's 
permanent files, two for the laboratory study by students in the 
botany department, and the others for exchange with other herbaria. 












Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Reduction of the number of school 
districts in 26 Southern Illinois counties from 2,552 to 240 is 
suggested in the recommendations of school survey committees in these 
southernmost counties, according to Dr. Howard E. Bosley, chairmen of 
the Southern Illinois University committee of consultants on school 
reorganization . 

Dr. Bosley based his computation on the recent progress report 
of the State Advisory Committee on School Reorganization in Illinois, 
covering a summary of the 91 counties in the sta*e which have submitted 
tentative reports on reorganization. 

Under the r ^commendations prepared by "tehe county survey committees 
of the 26 counties tabulated by Dr. Bosley, a total of 2,312 school 
districts would be eliminated, reducing the average number per county 
from 93 to 9. 

"Members of these survey committees art required by law to be lay 
people rather than teachers or school administrators," Dr. Bosley 
pointed out. 

"It is therefore evident that these recommendations for larger 
districts result from the hope of Mr. John Q. Citizen that we may 
develop better schools for Southern Illinois children*" 

Ten of the 19 county, committees recommending establishment of 
single county units for their respective counties are in Southern Illinc 
Bosley reported. These were Pulaski, Edwards, Hardin, Randolph, Union, 
Gallatin, Massac, Franklin, Saline and Lawrence. 

Final reports have been submitted by five Southern Illinois county 
committees—Wayne, Edwards, Macoupin, Richland, and Wabash. 

A list of the 26 Southern Illinois counties included in the 
progress report, together with the number of districts operating in each 
during 1945-46 and the number of districts recommended, follows: 

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1945-46 No. of 
Districts 



Bond 


79 


Boone 


65 


Clay 


104 


Clinton 


74 


Edwards 


42 


Fayette 


150 


Franklin 


114 


Gallatin 


53 


Hamilton 


92 


He.rdin 


34 


Jefferson 


145 


Johnson 


70 


Macoupin 


135 


Madison 


133 


Marion 


130 


Massac* 


41 


Monroe (filed in county supt , 




office — not yet re- 




ceived by St. Com. 




Montgomery 


149 


Pulaski 


32 


Randolph 


100 


Richland 


32 


St. Clair 


125 


Saline 


93 


Union 


79 


Wabash 


47 


Wayne 


160 


Williamson 


110 



Recommended 
No. of District 

4 
10 
30 

3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
9 
1 

3 
70 

16 

14 

14 

1 



1 
1 
3 

24 
1 
1 
2 

23 
3 



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Five additional counties in Southern Illinois — Alexander, Jackson, 
'erry, Pope, Washington — have voted to hold county surveys under H.B. 
.33 i which extends the period for making such surveys. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2**6-43 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb -Southern Illinois University's red-hot 
crew of Maroons swing into the stretch of their drive for their third 
consecutive Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title Saturday 
night when they play host to the big, powerful Huskies of Northern I 11 in 
State Teachers College at &;lf> p.m. in the Southern gym. 

In the previous meeting of the two teams at DeKalb esrly in January 
the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder eked out a narrow 52 to 51 win , This 
time, the Huskies will be playing the Maroons after having tackled the 
very tough Eastern Panthers at Charleston on Friday night. 

Northern is a very tall team, probably the tallest in the conference 
Seagrist at six feet seven, and Reisser at six feet five will give 
Northern a commanding height advantage, and will force Southern Captain 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, six feet four, to play a great game fight in.f 
for the rebounds. 

Hot-shot for the Huskie crew is its snappy, flashy forward Klein, 
who specializes with an over-the-head, two hand push shot. 

In the game the Maroons will be chasing their 16th victory of the 
season and eighth in a row. Victory over Northern will also mean the 
fifth win in I.I.A.C. play this season, and will give Southern a 
commanding position for the race to the wire. 

Coach Holder has indicated that he will stick to his regular startir 
lineup which includes Stinson, Bob Colborn of Flora, Ollie Shoaff of 
Mt. Carmel, and Jack Eadie and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort. 

'There will be a preliminary game beginning at 6:^° p.m. 












Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



» I 

* : 



2-6-4B 

Carbondal°, 111©, Feb. -The Representative Assembly of the 
Southern Division, Illinois Education Association, will convene on the 
Southern Illinois University campus Monday evening, Feb. 9> at 7 P#m., 
according to Elbert Fulkerson, assistant professor in University High 
School;) who is treasurer of the Southern Division. 

The delegates will meet in the Little Theatre in the Science 
Building* 



Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Since Feb. 12, Lincoln's Birthday is 
a school holiday, the open forum at Southern Illinois University usually 
scheduled on Thursday, will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 10, according to 
the sponsors of the series, the Independent Student Union and the 
Student Christian Foundation, 

Speaker for the Feb. 10 forum will be Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of 
the College of Vocations and Professions, who will speak on "Peace for 
Japan." The forum will be held at 7 p.m. in the Little Theatre, with 
Vernie Barnett of Metropolis es student chairman. 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -The Student Council at Southern Illinoi, 
University will stage a free, all-University dance on Thursday evening, 
Feb. 12, from 7 to 10 p.m. in the men s gymnasium, Joan Fairbairn 
of Hrrvey, Student Council president, has announced. 

An orchestra will furnish music for the occasion, which is open 
to all students and faculty. 






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m 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-6-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Appointment of Ledford Bischoff as 
instructor ana assistant to the dean of men at Southern Illinois 
University has been announced by University President Chester F. Lay. 

Bischoff, who completed the master of science in education degree 
here at Southern in 1946, spent last year as a faculty assistant on 
the University staff, assigned to counseling and testing work in the 
Veterans Guidance Center. In September he went to Syracuse University 
to study on his doctoral degree in personnel work; he also held a 
graduate assistantship there. 

He will be engaged in counseling and testing here at the University, 
assisting Dean of Men Marshall S. Hiskey, who was recently appointed 
acting dean of the College of Education for the spring and at least 
part of the summer. 

Bischoff, whose home was formerly in Berwyn, did his undergraduate 
work at Northern Illinois State Teachers College. 

Carbondale, 111.., Feb. - Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of 
Southern Illinois University, and Mrs, Lay will attend the inauguration 
of John W, Taylor as new president of the University of Louisville, 
Louisville, Ky . , Feb. 9 and 10 * 






i- 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-6-43 
Carbondale , 111., Feb.. - A group of Southern Illinois University- 
students recently made a trip to Springfield to visit the State 
Department of Health, to study its functions and operations first-hand, 
according to Ralph H. Boatman, University health coordinator. 

The students, who are members of the public health administration 

class here at the University, taught by Mr, Boatman and Miss Florence 

Denny, included: Harrison Bullock of Christopher, William Mc Bride of 

Carbondale, Leon Striegel of Murphysboro, Charles Richardson of Ewing, 

Thomas Throgmorton of Carbondale, and Elta Willms of Brownstown. 

The group learned that, among other activities, the State Department 
has approved the following hospital construction projects in Southern 
Illinois: Anna, 50-bed general hospital; Flora, 50-bed general 
hospital; Mt . Vernon, 137-bed general hospital and a 100-bed State 
tuberculosis sanitarium; Fairfield, 100-bed general hospital; 
Lawrenceville, 50-bed general hospital; Carthage, 50-bed hospital; and 
Oledo, 50-bed hospital. Under this hospital construction program, the 
State bears l/3 of the cost, the Federal government 1/3, and the local 
community 1/3, raised either by taxation or subscription. 

m 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs, director of the 
Health Service and professor-chairman of the physiology and health 
education department, Southern Illinois University, and Ralph Boatmen, 
health coordinator, attended the meeting of the American Medical 
Society on Rural School Services in Chicago Feb. 6 end 7. 

On Feb. 16-17, Boatman will attend a meeting of health coordinators 
of the six state supported colleges and universities in Springfield. 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




2-9-48 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carb#ndale, 111*, Feb» -Southern Illinois University* s defending 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champions, who are 
currently leading the conference race with five wins and no defeats, hav 
one ©f their hardest tasks of the season facing them Friday night when 
they visit the Leathernecks of Western Illinois State College at Macomb f 

The Leathernecks are n#w one of the hottest teams in the conference 
and it will take even more Maroon finesse to top them than it did to 
defeat the Huskies of Northern Illinois State Teachers College last 
Saturday night in Carbondale, 51-39* 

After a poor early season, the Western Illinois Leathernecks have 
suddenly revived into a highly potent outfit, handing Northern, 
Eastern j and Normal defeats in succession* In the meantime, the 
charges of Coach Lynn Holder at Southern have stacked up their second 
winning streak of eight straight games, bringing their season f s record 
to 16 wins against only two defeats* 

Bob Colborn, the Flora flash, was all-important in the Southern 
victory over the Huskies* Playing almost the entire game in his 
clever, inconspicious manner, Calborn's value to the team was vastly 
mo-re than the 18 points he scored w*uld indicate. 

Jack L»ng, promising young center, alsn of Flora, gave the most 
significant performance of his career thus far substituting for Capt« 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, who was in danger of fouling out, the agile, 
six-feet-three-inch Long gave a very gaod account of himself under the 
basket, rebounding and passing well, and contributing three baskets to 
the Southern victory. 

During much of the game Holder experimented with a new combination 
which found Colborn and Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, regular starters, 
working with Long and the Goss brothers, John and Charles r of Marion, 









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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-9-43 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -One of the principal projects of 
Southern Illinois University's new biological research laboratory is a 
study of a "fading" yeast that may indicate genes — hitherto suprosedly 
stable particles transmitting hereditary factors — may be damaged and 
repaired. 

Because this may offer a clue to the mystery of cancer, this work 
is supported by the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Fublic Health 
Service, according to Dr. Carl C, Lindegren, director of the laboratory 

He explained that this new point of view concerning the gene 
"suggests that cancer may result from the damage of genes, and, on the 
other hand, that if conditions in the bod}'' are maintained so that 
damage is minimized, the frequency of cancer may be reduced," 

He cautioned that, at present, this view is "pure hypothesis," 
and said that he is carrying out an extensive investigation to test it. 

Dr. Lindegren' s research is carried on entirely with yeasts, and 
is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic 
mechanism of the cell, which functions substantially the same in all 
living matter. 

Hence, Dr. Lindegren, like other scientists who are studying cells . 
is really searching for the mystery of life. Whatever can be learned 
about the structure, functions, multiplication, and life history, of 
the normal cell, throws added light on the cancer cell, which is 
regarded as a normal cell which has "gone haywire" and started growing 
in an abnormal manner. 

The yeasts which Dr. Lindegren studies are grown in cultures risrht 
in his lcboratory, and consequently can be grown under controlled 
conditions . 

By treatment with ultra violet light and musterd gas, he can 
strengthen or deplete certain characteristics, These yeasts can then 

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be mated to each other much as the agriculturist breeds a new strain 
of hybrid corn. 

One of the "new strains" he has produced is a vrriety which is 
red in color. 

Normally, such a yeast would remain red as lone; as its cells were 
"living," and normally this color would be transmitted to succeeding 
generations . 

His new discovery, however, is that one group of these red yeasts 
loses its ability to produce pigment, and "fades", indicating that the 
pigment-transmitting gene had somehow become damaged and did not 
function properly. 

This in itself was surprising enough, since individual genes have 
been thought to be constant and to retain their power throughout the life 
of the organism--person or plant . 

But a second surprise followed the first. Dr. Lindegren found 
that mating the "fading" yeast with another normal yeast restored the 
pigment to the offspring. 

As scientists are always on the alert to notice any deviation from 
the expected, and to speculate as to the reason for the aberration, 
Dr. Lindegren has the suspicion that this "fading" and "restoration" 
may indicate the possibility that genes may be damaged ?nd renaired . 

The new biological research laboratory was set up at Southern 
Illinois University Jan. 1, when Dr. Lindegren came here from Washington 
University, bringing with him an advance guard staff of Mrs. Lindegren, 
also a widely recognized scientist, and Bessie Kawachi, a laboratory 
technician. Mrs. Joseph Rafalko, wife of a University zoologist, has 
been appointed as a laboratory assistant, and ultimately a staff of 
about a half dozen will be built up. 

Dr. Lindegren has received a renewal of a $15,000 fund from 
Anheuser-Busch, Inc., since he came to Southern. He was also permitted 
to bring here some ^30,000 worth of equipment furnished by Anheuser- 
Busch to be used in his investigations. His work here is also supported 
by a 15000 grant from the American Cancer Society and a $5000 grant 
from the U.S. Public Health Service. 



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Southern Illinois 

^— ■—— i ■— — — — ■— — i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. H ^ H ^^ B ^ gH ^| Ht ^^^ WB 



Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Miss Kate Moe, mezzo-soprano, will be 
presented in a faculty recital by the Southern Illinois University music 
department Monday evening, Feb. 16, Dr. Maurits Kesnar, department 
chairman, has announced. 

Miss Moe, assistant professor of music, will be accompanied at the 
piano by Cecil Bolton, assistant professor. 

She will sing four groups of songs--Italian, French, German and 
Danish, 

Miss Moe holds the bachelor's degree from the University of .. 
Minnesota and the master's degree from the University of Idaho, She 
has studied at the Minneapolis College of Music, under Chicago teachers, 
and at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. 

She spent last year studying in the Royal Conservatory of Music in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, A native of Vermont, she is the daughter of Meta 
Moe, Danish novelist > whose books are all published in Denmark. 

Former head of the music department at Itasca Junior College in 
Minnesota and formerly on the faculty at Valparaiso University in 
Indiana, Miss Moe served two years during the war as a lieutenant (j.g.) 
in the U.S. Coast Guard, in charge of Coast Guard musical activities in 
the 13th Naval District, Seattle. She came to Southern in September, 
1947. 

Her recital here on February 16 will be given at 8 p.m. in the 
Little Theatre, and will be open to the public without charge, 

#### 



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I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






2-11-43 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb, -The high-stepping basketball Maroons 
of Southern Illinois University ranked third in the nation in average 
points scored per-garae according to the latest release of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Bureau, service bureau of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association* 

Coach Lynn Holder's high-scoring cagers had piled up 1113 points 
in 17 games for an average of 65 *3 points per game. The 1113 point 
total was also the highest number of points scored by any team listed by 
the Bureau, 

In compiling this remarkable average, the scoring for the Maroons 
has been fairly evenly divided. Forward Bob Colborn of Flora has been 
the leading scorer for the Maroons, and now has a total of 242 points, 
including one game played since the Jan. 31 release date of the 
Bureau's statistics. 

Other high scorers for Southern: Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, 
200; Ollie Shoaff of Mt . Carmel, 133; Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, 164; 
and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, 130, 






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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. aMMBMBHMIIHHMHBilHBH 



2-11-43 
Carbondale, 111., Feb. - A limited number .of tickets will be 
sold for the National Intercollegiate District Basketball Tournament 
which will be held in Carbondale March 2 and 3, according to Glenn ,f Abe v ' 
Martin, Maroon director of athletics and host to the tournament. 

The tournament, which will determine the Illinois representative 
to the National Tournament held in Kansas City, will be composed of 
four teams not yet selected. Three of these teams will be the winners 
of the three college conferences in Illinois, the Illinois Intercolles:ia 
Athletic Conference, the Little Nine, and the Pioneer Conference, The 
other participant will be the team in the state with the highest rating 
by the Sunkel system. 

Tickets for the tournament will go on sale Monday, Feb. 16, at the 
Southern Illinois University Business Office and at other places yet 
to be designated in other Southern Illinois cities. Only l£00 tickets 
will be sold, thereby assuring a seat for everyone who purchases a 
ticket ^ since the gym seats 1,700. 

Price of the tickets is $1.20, tax included, for each night. They 
may be purchased by mail from the Bursar , Business Office, Southern 
Illinois University, Carbondale. Payments must be by money order,, and 
a self -addressed envelope must be Included with each order „ 



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s, 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

^— ^— i — ■■ —■ -■■— ■— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. aaRMB^^^HBHHM^^vuMm^^M^u 



2-11-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Prof. Richard G. Browne, of Illinois 
State Normal University, will be the guest speaker before the Southern 
Illinois University chapter of the American Association of University 
Professors at its dinner session Monday evening, Feb. 16, according to 
Prof. E. G. Lentz, chapter president. 

Professor Browne is the son of the late Prof. George M. Browne, 
longtime head of the Southern chemistry department, and is himself a 
former Southern student. He later took degrees at the University of 
Illinois and Northwestern University. 

He is professor of political science and head of the social science 
department at Illinois State Normal University, and is co-author of thre- 
books on social science. Former president of the "Old Normal" chapter 
of A.A.U.P., Dr. Brown has been active in this organization, both 
locally and in statewide committee work. 

His subject when he speaks before the Southern group will be 
college and university government. 

m 



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Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Four Southern Illinois University 
faculty members will attend the semi-annual meeting of the Southern 
Illinois Schoolmasters' Club in Mt . Vernon Saturday. They are T. V7, 
Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Raymond H. 
Dey, director of the Extension Division; Willis E, Malone , assistant to 
the dean of the College of Education; and Harley Teel, principal of 
Brush School, one of the University's affiliated training school 
centers . 

Mr. Teel is chairman of the elementary principals' section of the 
club and will have charge of this section at the Mt . Vernon meeting. 

m 



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Southern Illinois 

— — — ^— — — — ^— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^— 1IMIMI — ■■■ !!!■■ IIMW ^I^B 



2*11*43 

Attention: Sports Editors: 

Carbondale,. Ill,, Feb. -The Southern Illinois University Maroons 
are looking for a victory over Western Illinois State College Friday 
at Macomb in order to ascure a tie for the championship of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference* 

Undefeated in conference play with five wins,- and boasting a 
season 1 * s record of 16 wins against only two losses $ the Maroons of 
Coach Lynn Holder tackle the hottest team in the state when they 
tangle with Western ** In the January meeting of the two teams In 
Carbondale, Southern emerged a 73 to 5$ victor.- 

But since that previous meeting, Western has run up a consecutive 
streak of six wins'^ including among their victims all the other teams 
of the I*-Ii'A*C« Meanwhile Southern has extended its current streak to 
eight straight wins,- 

Western boasts one of the hottest players in the conference in 
Red McCiure* and probably the tallest man performing on I„I.A.-C- courts 
in lanky Al Miksis. The task of smothering Miksis will go to Captain 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado,, who performed admirably in the earlier 
meeting by holding the long one to only six points* 

Stinson' s understudy at center, Jack Long of Flora, is still 
hobbled by the strained ankle he received last Saturday against Northern 
Since Long will probably be unable to play for' about two weeks,', Coach 
Holder had indicated that in the event of Stinson needing relief, he 
will use either high-scoring Bob Colborn of Flora,, a regular forward,- 
or Charles Goss of Marion, the man with the springs in his legs,- 

Both of these men played the pivot position in high school and 
should be able to operate effectively if needed.- 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois t , 



LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 






2-11-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb, -Dr. Earl R, Hall, assistant professor 
of education at Southern Illinois University, has been invited to serve- 
on a set up by the Illinois State Chamber of Commerce as part of the 
national educational program of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in which 
state and local chambers are cooperating. 

The Illinois chamber's committee on education is headed by James 
F. Stiles, Jr., of the Abbott Laboratories of North Chicago, and has for 
its immediate activities (1) reorganization of school districts, (2) 
sound financing of education in Illinois, and (3) securing an adequate 
supply of competent teachers. 

In asking Dr. Hall to serve on this committee, the Illinois chamber 
called attention to his "national reputation, valuable publications and 
active participation in the problem of reorganization of school district: 

Carbondale, 111,, Feb. -Samuel Duskin, noted violinist who began 
his concert career at the age of six, and who has made extensive tours 
throughout Europe and the United States, will be presented in a public 
concert by Southern Illinois University Feb, 19 at 8:30 p.m. in 
Shryock Auditorium, 

The concert violinist will spend two days at the University, 
lecturing and demonstrating before University music students, on Feb. 18 
and 19. 

His appearance here is jointly sponsored by the music department anc 
the lectures and entertainment committee. 

#### 



" i.i 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois »i 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. nW TfMMWWW nin illllllUli i nWMll i i — ■ ■ hmimmim— mb^i' 1 *\ 

1 



2-16-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Cost of educating students at Southern 
Illinois University declined from $556.42 per student in 1945-46 to 
^390.76 per student in the fiscal year which ended June 30, 1947, 
according to the annual report of Edward V. Miles, Jr., business manager 

This per capita cost approaches almost exactly the figure for 
1943, though it exceeds substantially the pre-war figures, which 
ranged from |136.16 in 1933 to $251,03 in 1937. 

While University income for 1946-47 was at an all-time high, 
totaling vl,329,766.66, enrollment was likewise at an all-time peak. 

For purposes of estimating the per capit; cost, enrollment of 
resident students for the fall, winter, spring and summer terms and of 
students in extension classes is converted to the equivalent of full- 
time students in residence for a long session, or 36 weeks. 

By this method of computation, the total enrollment for the entire 
year 1946-47 is figured at slightly more then 2,923 full-time students, 
compared to 1,3$7 students in 1945-46 and to the previous high of 
2,557 full-time students in 1941. 

Miles T report shows that the University 7 s expenditures for the 
fiscal year 1946-47 totaled ftl, 419, 137.33 an excess of |'39 ,370.72 
over current income for, that period. 

"This does not mean that the University actually T went in the red, ? 
Miles explained. "As a matter of fact, we had a unexpended balance of 
S|p26l, 432.11 in the income fund as of July 1, 1946," 

The University has two sources of income, Miles explains, state 
appropriations and its own earned income, the latter derived from fees, 
auxiliary enterprises, U. S. government contracts, end sales and 
services .. 

The University's total current income for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1947, totaling ^1,329 , 766 .66, was derived as follows: state 
appropriations,. 66*40 per cent; student fees, 17. 7^ per cent; sales 
and services (departments, 0.92 per cent; auxiliary enterprises, 9.3^ 

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per cent; U, S. government contracts, 1,36 per cent; student activities, 

4,17 per cent. ) 

■ ■ . 

Expenditures for the seme period included: administration and 
general expense, 12.82 per cent; retirement, disability and death 
benefits, 1.53 pen cent; instruction, 43.93 per cent; research, 0.77 
per cent; extension, 1.79 per cent; library, 4*90 per cent; physical 
plant, 14.76 per cent; refunds, 0.13 per cent; auxiliary enterprises, 
9. $9 per cent; U. S. government contracts, 6.02 per cent; student 
activities, 3.46 per cent. 

Receipts from U. S. government contracts in 1946-47 totrled 
$18,027.15, while expenditures totaled ^85 ,417 .7$, , the latter figure 
representing chiefly University funds expended in conversion of veterans 
housing projects. 

Expansion of Southern into university-scale activity is reflected 
in the, business manager T s report as it shows the spread of expenditures 
for the various colleges and the increased funds allotted for research. 

Instructional expenditures for 1946-47 totaled ^623,463.37, 
compared to ^428,214.53 for 1945-4-6. 

Distributed by colleges, these instructional expenditures for the 
two years compare as follows: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
41. $2 per cent for 1946-47 compared to 41.21 per cent for 1945-46; 
College of Vocations and Professions, 21,14 per cent, compared to 
16.22 per cent; College of Education, 32.20 per cent, compared to 
37.56 per cent; emeritus faculty salaries, O.67 per cent, compared to 
1.20 per cent; organized activities relating to Instruction, 4.17 per 
cent compared to 3.8l per cent. 

Although the funds expended in the College of Education declined 
from 37.56 per cent to 32.20 per cent, the actual amount rose from 
1160,337.01 in 1945-46 to ^200,729.31 in 1946-47. 

Development of research, which is one of the major functions of a 
university, is reflected in funds expended for this purpose during 
the past few years: ^203.53 in 1943-44; ^2,199.23 in 1944-45; $11, 867 .6* 
in 1945-46; and ^10,850.18 in 1946-47. 

These research funds represent funds expended for graduate studtnt 
assistants, for research materials and travel for faculty members 
engaged in research activities. 

The University's plant investment rose substantially during the 
past year, now being inventoried at ^2,686,078.29, compared to 

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$2 ,213 * 749*56 at the close of the fiscal year 1945-46. This increase 

of $472,323,73 is distributed as follows: Real Estate, t39^,903.96; i { 

improvements, ^6,419.05; equipment (expended from current funds--not ^Kf 

plant fund appropriations), $67 Y 00$%72 f *%i 

It should be observed that the increase in real estate is applicabl 
only to the past- year and does not j include all property acquired under" 
the University's land acquisvtionprogram which began July 1, 1945. To 
date these acquisitions total ijp723«945*37» 

The business officer's report also shows income and expenses of 
operating the Veterans Guidance Center and the University's two 
veterans housing projects; and fiscal affairs of various local funds, 
loan funds, and agency or organization funds* 









1 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois \ k 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ranBSBMraBMMaaMBH^BUBaHBXUH^^M^lV I 



*l 



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Attention: Sports Editors 2-16-4$ 

Carbondale , 111., Feb. - The die is cast for the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons, defending champions of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Associrtion. 

The result will be known Saturday night when the Maroons, who lost 
their first I. I. A. C. game of the season to Western last Friday, 71 
to 1+&) play host to second place Eastern in the Southern gymnasium. 
The contest will decide whether the Maroons are going to reign as 
undisputed I. I. A. C. champions for the third consecutive time. 

If the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder can recover from the 
overwhelming upset handed them by Western, they will be able to clinch 
the league title in one game by defeating Eastern. The Maroons have 
lost only once, and have remaining g ames against Normal as well as 
Eastern. Eastern has l©st twice, and a defeat this Saturday by 
Southern would be their third ;:nd would mathematically eliminate them 
from all hopes of the title. 

It w£ s a hot Western team which defeated Southern so thoroughly. 
They hit a high percentage of their shots, out-rebounded the Maroons, 
and played a more alert floor game. 

Southern threatened only once. After trailing 30 to 21 at 
halftime, a quick rally brought the Maroons to within two points of 
Western at 35-33. However, the Leathernecks soon regained control and 
won going away. 

In losing to Western, a bit of early season history was repeating 
itself. Southern opened the secsbn with eight consecutive wins before 
losing, but then dropped two. Eight more consecutive wins were 
recorded before We stern topped the Maroons last Friday, 

If history repeats itself, the Maroons a re due to lose to Eastern 
Saturday night to make their second straight loss. However, Co£ch 
Holder's charges are drilling hard this week to defy history. 

### 



^^^^ m ^ mm ^^^ mm ^ m —^^^— m Southern Illinois 

^ — ^— ^^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. rni»mirTirnf«^«niTMiii^iiiiiii«ii i 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - T w o "Service to Southern" awards*- -each 
a fine wrist wctch — will be presented to t wo Southern Illinois 
University students by the Kappa Delta Alpha fraternity at an All- 
School Variety Show which the fraternity will sponsor Feb, 23 . 

A boy end £ girl will be selected by e faculty committee from 
a list of more than A-0 nominations made by various student organizations 
Nominees must be juniors or seniors. 

The watcht.s to be presented to the t wo students who have rendered 
the outstanding service to the University art. currently on display in 
the Main Building. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., .Feb, - A Southern Illinois University faculty 

member has been invited to attend the United Nations Institute at 

Lake Success, New York, Feb, 23-26, 

geography 
Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham, chairman of the University/^agrspJiSjr' 

department, is one of 600 educators who received the invitation from 

Dean Ernest 0. Mel by of New York University's School of Education. 

The institute provides an opportunit}' for the educators to observe 

the Security Council and other UN agencies in operation, and to confer 

with international leaders. 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Five Southern Illinois University 
seniors have been elected to Sphinx Club, student honor and service 
society. They are John Mulkin of Herrin, Robert Curtis of Carbondale, 
Mrs. Veda Hallam Etheridge of Fcirfield, Ctrl Wimberly of Granite 
City, and Charles Weber of Cairo. 









Southern Illinois 



|^"""" —— mm *-*—*— mm ■■■ ■— i i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. mii ■■^■■■■■■iiii n im wimiihimhiiii 






Carbondale, 111., Feb, -An interpreter of the foremost modern 
works as well as a master of the classics, Samuel Dus "h'ki'n will be 
presented in a violin concert at Southern Illinois University Jan. 19 
at 8:30 p.m. in the Little Theatre. 

Dus-hki^i has introduced heretofore unknown musical gems from the 
17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, and has als« presented world premieres 
of works by outstanding contemporary composers such as Ravel and 
Stravinsky. 

Born in Russia, but now an American citizen, Dushkin began his 
concert career at the age of six. A pupil of Kreisler, Ramy and Auer, 
he has made extensive tours throughout Europe and the United States. 
He was first heard in this country with the New York Symphony Orchestra, 
conducted by Walter Damrosch, and has appeared with the Boston Symphony 
under Koussevitzky and the Philadelphia Orchestra under Stokowski. 

He represented the United States on an International Musical Counci.' 
which recently met in England, This council was formed for the purpose 
of selecting the best musical compositions since the war and manuscripts 
from all nations were reviewed, 

Mr. Dushkin will spend Wednesday and Thursday at the University, 
lecturing and demonstrating his techniques to University music students. 

His concert on Thursday evening will be open to the public, without 
charge. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-17-43 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. 17 - Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of 
Southern Illinois University, is attending the sessions of the American 
Management Association 1 s Personnel Conference in Chicago today and 
Wednesday. 

m# 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Dr. Carl L. Lindegren, director of 
Southern Illinois University' s new biological research laboratory, will 
be the guest speaker at the meeting of the University' s new Physics 
Club Monday evening, Feb. 23. 

The meeting will be open to the public, Homer Badgett of Mt . Vernon, 
student president of the club, has announced. It will be held on the 
third floor of Parkinson Laboratory, starting at 7 p.m. 

Dr. Lindegren' s subject will be "Speculations on the Structure of 
the Gene." 

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Carbondale, 111., .Feb. -Finals in the one-act play contest 
for student organizations at Southern Illinois University will be held 
at £ p.m. Wednesday Feb. 18 in Shryock Auditorium. 

Groups which have won in preliminary rounds and which will stage 
their plays Wednesday night are Anthony Hall, Kappa Delta Alpha, Nu 
Epsilon Alpha and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

The contest is sponsored by the Little Theatre, and prizes will 
be given to the winning organization and to the best actor and the 
best actress. Paul Hibbs, principal of DuQuoin High School, will be 
guest critic" i-JudgVv ---■....<..•_•. 

A nominal charge for admission will be made. The public is invited 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■H^^^HBl^^HHH^MMMi^HH^BiJMBM * I 



2*17*43 • 

Carbondale t Jli« r ' Feb*. 17 -Most .state mix varsities "have grown 
without shape or form 6r plan, without consciousness of tj&e%t identity 
with the community or region in which they are IwcateA," a distinguished 
educator yesterday told the assembled faculty of Southern Illinois 
University* 

"l*ve seen them act like cream separators j* --Dr* Paul 5* Sears, 
professor of botany at Oberl^n College,," declared,, 

"They <*sorne of them- -skim off the best talent among their students, 
train those superior students and send them off to the metropolitan 
areas, so that their brains and leadership ere lost to their own home 
communities f n 

Southern, which only recently has embarked, on a univers it y~ scale 
program, has a "great chance to contribute to the development ^f a 
region that is unusual in its unity and interests^ the speaker asserted. 

Remarking on the fact that Southern alone .serves approximately one 
fourth the geographical area of Illinois and approximately one* fourth; 
of the state" 5 s population, as the only degrees-granting higher educationa] 
institution in Southern Illinois, ■••■Br, Sears asserted^ "You've g«t probler 
in this region-- they exist everywhere -*but they need: to be Kork^d on by 
the best of your students *" 

Man is inevitably a part of his sonanunity environment, influenced 
by and making his own impact upon its natural resourcesf. the speaker 
said* 

"The only trouble Is* we don't act as if we believed that fact," 
he declared* 

One of a series of outstanding educators being brought to the 
Southern campus this year as consultants in the school's year-ground 
"University Recognition* program*- £ )r » Sears stressed the fact that "man 
belongs to th-e land scape ,"• and should live in harmony with his 
surroundings --making good use of the natural and human resources, 

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developing them, conserving them. 

He urged a broad sound general education as the basis for all kinds 
of specialization, and discounted the "tragic narrowness" of the 
professional or technical training that does not embrace a broad 
grounding in "the great body of common knowledge." 

"This liberal education is essential not only for the individual 
student's development, but also for the protection of the society in 
which he is to practice his profession," he insisted. 

Dr. Sears decried the fact that students who prepare for the teach in 
profession "often don't rate up with those who choose engineering and 
medicine." 

"It's tragic, for a really good leader can transform a community," 
he said. 

"Encourage your best students to teach," he urged. "Don't take 
leftovers ." 

In the area of research and community service, his advice was to 
gear these activities to the needs and desires of the region, while not 
neglecting investigations into the field of "universal knowledge," 

The speaker remained on the University campus on Tuesday to confer 
with faculty members individually and in groups, and to counsel with 
students in the botany department. 

He was presented to the faculty Monday by Dr. T.W, Abbott, dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, after University President 
Chester F. Lay outlined the year-' round program of bringing educators 
to counsel with Southern faculty members and students on the opportunitie 
and responsibilities of a university in teaching, research and service. 

Southern was authorized by the General Assembly and the Teachers 
College Board in 1943 to extend its work into other fields tban teacher- 
education; it has been recognized as a university by educational 
accrediting agencies; and in the summer of 1947 its name was legally 
changed to "Southern Illinois University." 









Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois * i 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^MI^MBMI^MB^MI^^^^^^^^^^^^J^ I 



2-17-46 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -One of the founders of the Modern 
Dance Center of Minneapolis in 1937, Gertrude Lippincott, a widely 
known solo performer and choreographer, will be presented in a dance 
concert at Southern Illinois University Wednesday evening, Feb. 25, 
at 8 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

Miss Lippincott, who is noted for her successful combination <nf 
concert dance and educational work, will conduct a "master class" in 
modern dance technic and composition while here for University students 
and others interested in the dance. 

This "master class," according to Dr. Dorothy Davies, acting 
chairman of the women's physical education depertment, which will act 
as sponsor, will be a participation lesson, not a demonstration for 
observation purposes. 

The "master class" will be held at the women's gymnasium on 
Thursday evening. 

Miss Lippincott 1 s dance concert here is sponsored by the University 
lectures and entertainment committee, which is headed by Dr. F.M. 
Larson, associate professor and chairman of the speech department. It 
will be open to the public without charge. 

The dancer who received her master' s degree in dance from New York 
University in 1946, was head of dance activities at Mount Holyoke 
College from 1943 to 1946. During the fall of 1947 she was artist-in- 
residence at Hamline University in St, Paul. 

An editor of Dance O bserver , a monthly publication devoted to 
contemporary dance, she is a contributing editor of Dance , and has 
written extensively on the dance for other publications. 

#### 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. BBIHHHHHMHHHBBaBHBBaMM ^ | 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-19-43 

Carbondale, 111., F e b. - The outstanding home attraction of 
the season is on tap for Southern Illinois basketball fans Saturday 
night when the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder square off against Eastern 
Illinois State College at 5:15 p.m. in the Southern gym. 

The Maroons have their tv/o-year possession of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title on the block. Victory for 
Southern will clinch the third straight I. I. A, C. conference title, 
but a loss will throw the league into a tie between Eastern and 
Southern which will not be cleared until the end of the season. 

Also at stake for the Maroons is the right to represent the 
I. I. a. C. in the National Intercollegiate District Tournament to be 
held in Carbondale March 2 and 3. 

In the previous game between the two teams, Southern, enjoying one 
of its best performances of the season, defeated Eastern on the foreign 
court, 5$ to 54. It was in that game that Jack Eadie of West Frankfort 
turned in his best performance of the season with 21 points. Ollie 
Shoaff of Mt. Carmel added 14 as the Maroons won on the long-shot skills 
of these two men. 

Eastern's stars are Bob Olson, former letter-winner at the 
University of Illinois, Neal Hudson, a great four year veteran, and Don 
Glover, one of the all-time greats of Paris high school basketball. 

Along with guards Eadie and Shoaff, Holder plans to use his other 
regular starters, brilliant Bob Colborn of Flora, Captain ^uentin 
Stinson of Eldorado, and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort. Reserves Charles 
and John Goss of Marion are ready for relief action, but substitute 
center Jack Long of Flora continues on the ailing list with the sprained 
ankle he suffered two weeks ago. 

Although Holder was typically non-committal about the outcome of 
the game, he carried an optimistic air. 

### 



'mi 



^ ^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

^ -^ — — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ,— -^— M __^_ - ^ M ^^^^ i ^^_^_^^_ 






Attention: Sports Editors 2-19-4# 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Beginning with an eight-day, six-game 
trip to New Orleans in the middle of March, the Southern Illinois 
University baseball team will play a 19-game schedule this spring, 
according to Athletic Director and Baseball Coach Glenn ?r Abe' ,? Martin. 

Two games with Loyola University of the South at New Orleans on 
March 17 and IS will mark the Maroon's deepest penetration into Dixie. 
On the way to New Orleans the Martin-men will meet Millsaps College and 
Mississippi College and returning northward they face Southwestern 
Louisiana Institute and Louisiana Tech. 

Track Coach Leland P. n Doc" Lingle's cinder team is lined-up with 
eight meets, beginning April 10 against Western Illinois State College 
at Carbondale and closing May 21-22 at Carbondale when the Maroons 

play host to the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Meet. 

been 
The following baseball and track schedules have /approved by the 

faculty athletic committee under the chairmanship of Dr. William Neal 

Phelps, according to Martin: 

Baseball: March 15, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi; 
March 16, Mississippi College, Clinton, Mississippi; March 17 and 18, 
Loyola University, New Orleans; March 19, Southwestern Louisiana 
Institute, LaFayette, Mississippi; Louisiana Tech, Ruston, Louisiana; 
April 3, Arkansas State, Jonesboro, Arkansas; April 10, Illinois State 
Normal University, here; April 16 and 17, Western Illinois State College 
here; April 24; Arkansas State, here; May 7, Illinois State Normal 
University, Normal; May 8, Shurtleff, Alton; May 14 and 15, Northern 
Illinois State Teachers College, DeKalb; May 21, Shurtleff, here; 
May 22, Eastern Illinois State College, here; May 29, Eastern Illinois 
State Teachers College, Charleston; May 31, Louisiana Tech, here. 

Track: April 10, Western Illinois State College, here; April 14, 
Cape Girardeau, here; April 24, Illinois State Normal University, here; 
May 1, Eastern Illinois State College, Charleston; May 7, Cape 
Girardeau, there; May 15, Washington University, St. Louis; May 21-22, 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Meet, here. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. a^^^^nHUBBM^^^^BM^^H^HHBB^HMl i 



2-19-46 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Ed Melvin of Tamaroa and June Fulkerson 
of Carbondale won the "best actor" and "best actress" awards Wednesday 
night in the second annual one-act play contest for student organization: 
at Southern Illinois University. 

The contest, sponsored by the Little Theatre, student dramatic 
group, drew entries from nearly a dozen fraternities, sororities, 
organized houses and other groups. 

Kappa Delta alpha fraternity won first place, with a presentation 
of Eugene O'Neill's "lie," in which Melvin and Kiss Fulkerson performed. 

Other finalists were Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory, Mu Epsilon 
Alpha and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

The winning play will be presented a second time on Monday night, 
Feb. 23, as a feature of the All-School Variety Show, which is 
sponsored by the KDA's. 

Guest critic judge for the final contest was Paul Hibbs, DuQuoin 
high school principal. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Athylin Harris of Grand Chain, Southern 
Illinois University co-ed, has been chosen one of four Illinois young 
people to represent 45,000 Illinois 4-H Club members at t he national 
4-H Club camp in Washington next June. 

Miss Harris is a junior at the University and is enrolled in the 
College of Education. Her major subject is home economics, her minor 
art. 

She was salutatorian of her high school graduating class, and 
received a State normal school scholarship and the Daughters of the 
American Revolution "good citizenship" award. 

Here at Southern she is active in the Home Economics Club and the 
Student Christian Foundation. 

m 



» 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^ ^^^^^mm— 



> I 



2-19-4$ 

Carbondale, 111,, Feb, - Two vocal groups from Southern Illinois 
University--the 7$-voice University Choir and the 14™voice Madrigal 
Singers — will make several out-of-town trips during the next few weeks 
to present concerts or to appear before music organizations. 

The Madrigal Singers have been invited to sing before the Illinois 
Music Educators Conference at Normal, Saturday, Feb e 21, On Sunday ; 
Feb. 22, and again on Sunday, Feb, 29, this unit will hold joint 
concerts with the Benton Madrigal Singers, the first in Benton., the 
second in Carbondale, The Benton program will be given at 3 p* rn 9 
and will be open to the public without charge. Coffee will be served 
following the concert* 

On Wednesday, Feb. 25 ? at 8 p e m,, the entire Choir, including the 
Madrigal Singers, will present a concert at the First Methodist Church 
in Marion, under the sponsorship of Delta Sigma Phi sorority* 

The two musical groups will also give a 45-minute program here on 
the University ^aampus dn Feb. 24, before the Southern Illinois Fruit 
Growers , 

A five-day tour of the northern part of the state is being planned 
for the two groups during the spring recess in mid-March* 

These two vocal groups are directed by Floyd V* Wakeland, associate 
professor of music* 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois n , 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. j, nmHm ^ n ^^ HK ^ aH ^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-20-43 

Carbondale, 111., F e b. - Although there are still plenty of 
tickets available for the National Intercollegiate District Tournament 
to be held here March 2 and 3, the sale is progressing well, according 
to Glenn "Abe" Martin, Maroon director of athletics and host to the 
tournament. 

Ticket sales for the four-team event between the best small-college 
cagers in Illinois has been surprising from the viewpoint that there 
has been a larger demand for tickets for the game March 3. The March 
3 ame will d etermine the championship and the team which will represent 
Illinois in the National Intercollegiate Tournament which will be held 
in Kansas City the following week. 

However, Martin stated that he had thought there would be a much 
larger group of people interested in seeing the two games the preceding 
night than the single championship contest. 

On March 2 the champions of the three Illinois College Conferences 
will meet along with the team in the state with the highest rating 
according to the Dunkel system. On the last Dunkel rating, Southern 
had the highest r ating in the state, and was followed by the Western 
team which defeated the Maroons in last week T s astounding upset* 

What the consequence of that upset will be upon the Dunkel rating 
of Southern is hard to foresee, but the Maroons still have two tracks 
open for entrance into the tournament, either by having the highest 
Dunkel rating or by winning the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic 
Conference, which they are now leading. 

Tickets are on sale in v arious Southern Illinois cities and may 
be purchased by mail from the Bursar, Business Office, Southern Illinois 
University, by enclosing a money order with a stamped self-addressed 
envelope. 

Price of the tickets is $>1.20, and only 1,600 will be sold for 
each night, thereby assuring a seat for every purchaser. 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






2-21- 46 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. — Foreign language beginners at Southern 
Illinois University are going to learn to speak French and Spanish as 
the natives know them. 

This spring, a conversational Spanish course, taught by a native 
of Mexico,, and a conversational French course, taught by a native French 
iirl., will be added to the foreign language department schedule, 
according to Hiss Vera Peacock, department chairman* 

Beginners in either lan ua_e take the corresponding conversational 
class in addition to their three-hour beginners 1 course, and get an 
extra hour's credit for it, but are not required to do so, Miss Peacock 
said. 

The conversational French class will be taught by Mrs. Jacqueline 
Elliott, a French war bride whose American veteran husband is enrolled 
at Southern. Mrs. Elliott was a teacher in France before she married 
,'arren John Elliott of Wood River, who was stationed in France with the 
"J.S. armed forces. 

The Spanish class will be taught by Jose Luis Reye.s of Mexico City, 
a graduate student and holder of the first Rotary Club Latin-American 
scholarship at Southern, Reyes has been teaching in the foreign language 
iepartment since his arrival here last summer, 

Similar conversational classes will be added for German and Russian 

Later on, Miss Peacock said. 

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Carbondale,, 111., Feb,. - George Rickey, former artist-in- 
residence at Olivet College and Knox College, and now head of the art 
iepartment at Muhlenburg College, will visit Southern Illinois University 
aere for two days March 4 and 5 as a guest consultant and demonstrator 
for art students. 

Mr. Rickey's visit is being sponsored by the University lectures 
and entertainment committee, and will give a demonstration of portrait 
tainting in the Little Theatre at 4 p.rru on March L, 

He will speak before several art classes on such subjects as 
aodern movements in art, color, design, silk screen techniques, corn- 
•osition and surrealism, 

Mr, Rickey has exhibited at New York's Uptown Gallery, the Detroit 
md Denver Museums, Oakland Museum and others. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-21-43 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Firs. i-.ary Agnes Starr of Cairo, 
interpreter of French Canadian folk songs, will be brought to Southern 
Illinois University March 3, to talk before French and music classes 
and to present a public lecture-recital in the evening. 

The music and foreign language departments are cooperating in 
sponsoring i-irs. otarr's visit. 

All interested students and faculty are invited to attend krs. 
Starr's class lectures, while the informal dinner at the Cafeteria at 
6 p.m. and the recital at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre are open to all 
persons in Southern Illinois who may be interested. Special invitations 
to attend have been sent to members of the newly- organized Illinois 
Folklore Society, according to Kiss Vera Peacock, chairman of the 
foreign language department. 

trftff 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Dr. Howard E. Bosley, associate 
professor, and Dr. Earl R. Hall, assistant professor, both on the 
faculty of the Southern Illinois University College of Education, 
will attend the convention of the American Association of School 
Administrators in Atlantic City, h. J., F^d. 21-25. 



Release monday 

Carbondale, ill., Feb. - a large group of students in the 
botany department at Southern Illinois University are in St. Louis 
today visiting Shaw's Gardens. They were accompanied by Dr. Walter B. 
Welch, chairman of the botany department and Fliss kargaret Kaieser, 
I, M. karberry and Firs. Irma Tate T "ard of the botany faculty. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2-23-43 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb* -Southern Illinois University's great 
Maroon team clinched its third consecutive basketball championship of 
the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference last Saturday by 
swamping second place Eastern 73 to 52, 

The I.I.a.C. championship which came with the victory assured the 
Maroons of the right to participate in the Illinois Intercollegiate 
District Basketball Tournament which wi 11 be held in Carbondale March 
2 and 3. 

Tuesday night the Holderrnen close their regular home schedule when 
they face Evansville College. Evansville is one of three teams which 
can claim a victory over the Maroons, having won in the finals of the 
New Year's Day Tournament at Vincennes by a narrow 62 to 60 margin, 
which was the first Southern loss of the season. 

The game last Saturday against Eastern was the finest seen in the 
Southern gymnasium this year. Although Southern jumped to an early lead 
Eastern rallied quickly and the two teams traded punches, basket for 
basket, for the last ten minutes of the first half, which ended 34 to 29 

1 

in favor of the Maroons, 

Early in the second half, Southern moved out quickly on the wings 
of a "hot" rally and was- never headed. Joe Hughes of West Frankfort 
sparked the Southern attack throughout the game, Hughes passed well, 
rebounded well, and scored better than he has done any time previously, 
counting a total of 20 points. 

The remainder of the scoring was well divided, with Jack Eadie 
of West Frankfort hitting 14, Capt. Quentin Stinson of Eldorado 13, Bob 
Colborn of Flora 12, and Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel 11. 

Eastern's hot-shot forward, classy Don Glover, led the visitor's 
scoring with 16 points. 

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. 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



2-23-4S 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Three new dances will be introduced by 
Miss Gertrude Lippincott, noted modern dancer, when she makes a public 
appearance at Southern Illinois University Wednesday evening, Feb. 25, 
at & p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

The new numbers will include "Pavana", a dance with the flavor of 
the Spanish court of the 16th century, performed to music composed for 
this dance by Ralph Gilbert, young American composer; "Pastoral" with 
music by the modern French composer Francis Poulenc; and "Three 
Indecisions" with music by Lionel Nowack, assistant director of the 
School of Music of Syracuse University, 

Miss Lippincott T s costume for "Pavana" was designed by Julie 
Bouteel of California, and that for "Pastorale" by Eileen Holding of New 
York. 

Miss Lippincott, a native of St. Paul, has studied the dance at the 
University of Chicago, the University of Minnesota, and under Jan Veen 
in Boston and Leslie Burrowes in London. after a European tour during 
which she saw the Olympic Dance Festival and many folk dance exhibits, 
she spent several summers at the Bennington School of Dance. 

In 1937, with several interested collegues, she established the 
Modern Dance Center of Minneapolis. She later studied with Doris 
Humphrey, Charles Wiedman, Martha Graham, and Hanya Holm, and in 1943 
received the master's degree in the dance at New York University. 

She has appeared in concert dances in New York, San Francisco, Bost 
Ithaca, Detroit, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Duluth, Superior, Wise, 
Lafayette, Indiana, and many other cities. Last year she performed at 
the universities of Ohio, Cincinnati and Indiana, and at Purdue Universi 
Ball State Teachers College, Mount Holyoke and others. Her latest New 
York appearance was Feb. 15 when she presented a new ballet "Dance of 
Dedication" for the Choreographers' T 'orkshop. 

Last fall she was artist-in-residence at Hamline University. 

Miss Lippincott will be accompanied by Miss Margaret Stableski of 
the McPhail School of Music, Minneapolis. 

Her dance concert will be open to the public without charge. 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






2-24-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. 24 - Miss Kinuye Jitodai of Seattle, VJash. , 
and Carlos Pleshe of Buckner, 111., last night received the first 
"Service to Southern" awards at Southern Illinois University. 

The awards were made by Kappa Delta alpha fraternity at an all- 
school variety show sponsored by the fraternity. 

Approximately 40 nominations were presented for the honor, and Miss 
Jitodai and Pleshe were chosen by a faculty committee as the two 
students among the University's juniors and seniors who have rendered 
the highest service to the institution. 

Miss Jitodai, American-born of Japanese ancestry, came to Southern 
in 1944, to study art. She has become one of the outstanding student 
leaders on the campus. This year she was elected president of nnthony 
Hall, girls dormitory and largest of all organized houses on the campus. 
Last year she served as president of Kappa Pi, the art fraternity. 

Her other activities include the Independent Student Union and 
the Student Christian Foundation. Last fall, she served on the 
Homecoming Committee. 

a senior this year, she is regarded as one of the most promising 
students in the art department. 

Pleshe, a junior, is editor of the 194$ Obelisk, student yearbook; 
has been active in the Little Theatre, the Fotos Club, Chi Delta Chi 
fraternity; belongs to Southern Knights, honorary service club; serves 
as a student member of the Veterans Committee and on the Inter-fraternity 
Council; served on the 1947 Homecoming Committee; is public address 
system announcer for football and basket ball games, and last year held 
a job as radio technician for University broadcasts. 

Both Miss Jitodai and Pleshe were selected for inclusion in T -7ho T s 
Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities for 1947-4$. 



m 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1 I 



*l 






2-24-4S 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Twenty-two Southern Illinois University- 
students have been selected for inclusion in the 1948 edition of "/ho T s 
Who .among Students in Am erican Colleges and Un iversiti es. 

These students were chosen by a faculty committee after 
consideration of every student in the junior and senior classes. 

Election was based on leadership in student activities, service 
to the University, and scholarship. 

The 1948 selections include the following: 

Betty Adams of Sparta, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, Peggy 
Coleman of Marion, Pauline Crader of E . St. Louis, Robert Curtis of 
Carbondale, Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, June Fulkerson of Carbondale, 
Mrs. Veda Hallam Etheridge of Fairfield, Lewis T. Hammack of Sparta, 
Kinuye Jitodai of Seattle, Wash., Dale Kittle of Wayne City, Rodney 
Kraatz of Olmsted, Martha McBrayer of Benton, Velma McCormick of 
Johnston City, Charles Mathieu of Eldorado, Tom Middleton of Hoopeston, 
John Mulkin of Herrin, Jesse Perkins of E. St. Louis, Carlos Pleshe of 
Buckner, William Price of Texico, . v uentin Stinson of Eldorado, V e ra 
Turner of Monsanto. 

m 

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2-24-42 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - The 'newly organized Southern Illinois 
art Association will hold its first regular meeting, to adopt a 
constitution and elect officers, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Hine in De Soto, Sunday, Feb. 29, at 3 p. m. 

A committee to draft the proposed constitution and present a slate 
of officer nominees, headed by Don Morris of Marion and Johnston City, 
Southern Illinois art student, chairman, will report at the forthcoming 
meeting. 

A discussion of "What is Modern Painting 1 '' led by Miss Emily 
Farnham of the University art faculty. 

m# 






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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■■■■■■■■■■■i 



2-24-43 

Carbondale, 111,, Feb. 25 - Four educators from Ball State 
Teachers College in Indiana are visiting Southern Illinois University 
today and tomorrow (Feb. 25 and 26) to study Southern's health education 
program. 

Southern's program is a broad one, involving a student health 
service, a department of physiology and health education, instruction 
and research in a number of other departments, housing, physical educatic. 
and extension courses and field service. A full-time health coordinator 
'has been added to the University staff this year in a joint regional 
health service project conducted by the University and the Kellogg 
Foundation. A large health committee functions on a year- 'round basis 
to stimulate integration of all phases of the University's health 
program, both on the campus and throughout Southern Illinois, 

The University's program was recently described by a representative 
of the Kellogg Foundation as one of the i? best organized/'' ones in the 
country. 

The Ball State Teachers College delegation will include President 
Ralph Noyes; Dr. F. B. Williams, head of the physical education 
department; Dr. Wood, college physician; and Mrs, Crouch of the science 
faculty. 



jiJi.ij.41. 
inrfrir 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Two debate teams from Southern Illinois 
University will compete in inter-state debate meets this week, according 
to Dr. P. M. Larson, speech department chairman, 

a team composed of Denzil Berry of ^shley, Joseph Barnett of Equalit 
James Cannon of Marion and Evan Hill of Marion will go to Washington 
University, St. Louis, Mo., on Feb. 24, while a second team composed of 
Lewis Hammack of Sparta, Charles Weber of Cairo, Phyllis Johnson of 
DuQuoin and Charlotte Waggener, will participate in a meet at Murray 
State College, Kentucky, Feb. 27-26. 



il:lu 
frntt 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^■^MMJ^^^HMMMM 



"1 I 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-24-43 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - With only the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference title decided, mystery still remains over the 
identity of the other three contestants in the National Intercollegiate 
District Tournament for Illinois which will be held in Carbondale 
March 2 and 3. 

Southern Illinois University 1 s I. I. h, C. champions became the 
first to earn a berth in the tourney- when they clinched their third 
consecutive title by overwhelming second place Eastern 73 to 52 
Saturday night. 

In the Little Mine, Wheat on recently pulled up to a tie with 
Millikin. The Pioneer Conference has Quincy on top with Shurtleff a 
close second. From these teams will probably come two contestants 
representing their respective leagues. 

The fourth-place team is the team in the state with the highest 
rating according to the Dunkel System, and will be chosen according to 
the Feb. 2$ Dinkel release. The best, information indicates that 
Western Illinois, currently one of the hottest teams in the state, 
will have the highest racing as a result of a current winning streak 
which they climaxed by whipping Southern's Maroons who previously had 
enjoyed the highest "Dunkel.'' 

If Western should enter the tourney by virtue of its high rating, 
the first game would be on the order of a grudge encounter since the 
Leathernecks would face Southern in the rubber game of the season. 
Each team has decisively defeated the other on its home court. 

Tickets for the tournament may be purchased by mail from the Bursar. 
Business Office, Southern Illinois University, by enclosing a money 
order of $1.20 per game in a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Ticket 
sales are limited to 1600. 

UJlJUi 

irufi ft 







Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service CARBONDALE > Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. naaBMnsHBOHflnnanBHi 



Carbondale, 111. , Feb. - A Southern Illinois University-designed 
typing desk is described ana illustrated by drawings in a recent issue 
of the Industrial Arts and Vocational Education Magazine . 

The desk was designed by Robert W. English, assistant professor 
of industrial education, to carry out specifications developed by Va. A, 
Buboltz, assistant professor of business. 

Sixty of the desks were made for the University and are now in use 
in the typing laboratories here, according to Mr. English. 

Chief feature of the desk is its sturdiness to withstand the 
vibration of shifting the typewriter carriage. Bolted joints and corner 
braces provide this stability. 

First of the desks made for the University were put in use about 
seven years ago, and show no signs of shakiness, Mr. Buboltz reports. 

The drawings contributed by Mr. English to Industrial Arts , and 
Vocational Education Magazine are sufficiently detailed that educational 
institutions may use them to have similar desks built either in their 
own industrial education laboratories or by commercial concerns, he said. 

ifltW 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - Date of Mrs. Mary Agnes Starr's 
.ecture-recital of French Canadian folk songs at Southern Illinois 
Jniversity has been postponed from March 3 to March 31, according to 
)r. Vera Peacock, chairman of the foreign language department. 

Mrs. Starr, whose home is in Cairo, will be presented jointly 
)y the music and the foreign language departments, and she will talk 
before classes in both departments. 

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v 







Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service CARBONDALEi "-"nois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■l 



2-25-4S 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - The 50-piece Southern Illinois University 
Symphony Orchestra will be presented in a public concert in Shryock 
Auditorium on the University -c ampus here Thursday, March 4, at 8:15 
p. m. , according to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, director. 

The concert will be complimentary to the public, Dr. Kesnar said. 

Harold Hines, instructor in the music department and band director, 
will be soloist, and will perform the Haydn '"Concerto for Trumpet." 

Members of the Symphony Orchestra include the following students: 

Belleville: Kent Werner 

Cambria: Bill Morse 

Carbondale: James Farmer, Johnny Fly, Q.D. Miskell, Barbara Swartz, 
former students— -Alma Deane Smith, Ernestine Cox 
Taylor, and University High students—Peter Kesnar, 
Charles Dickermann, Lloyd Higgerson. 

Christopher: Carl Lutes. 

Collinsville: Mel Siener. 

DuQuoin: Mike R. Bianco, Jr., Harrison Pallett. 

E. St. Louis: Anne Kuehn. 

Fairfield: Robert Eugene Howey, Sue Collins, Bill Green. 

Granite City: Richard Barron. 

Herrin: Naomi Kuekner, Roger N. Hughes, John Mulkin, Carolyn 
Miller, Ray Springs. 

Lincoln: Robert Harmon. 

Marion: Roy Barth, Bill Davis, Randall Ashley. 

Metropolis: Ellen R. Williams. 

Murphysboro: Bill Ledbetter. 

Norris City: Doris Ivy. 

Salem: Jacqueline Davis, Jerrol Williams* 

Vienna: Louise Toy, Harold L. Gray, Betty McHenry, Anette Mclntire, 
Patricia Murrie. 

Waterloo: Norman Rodenburg. 

West Frankfort: Elizabeth Ann Whiteside, Joann Weaver, Juanita 

Plantec, Harold Eldridge, Chloteal Arnette. 



Clinton, Kentucky: Hampton Lilliard. 









Southern Illinois 
University 






Information Service CARBONDALE - iluhois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. iHHB^HHHHnMKflBU^naBHMHai 



2-25-4S 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Taking sweet revenge for a defeat 
handed them earlier in the season, the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons easily topped Evansville College here Tuesday night 64 to 49, 
ending Southern's regular season home schedule. 

However, it was not the last appearance of seniors Quentin Stinson 
of Eldorado and Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel on the Southern court. They 
will play again next Tuesday in the opening round of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate District. Tournament when the Maroons, who have earned 
the right to participate in the tourney by virtue of winning the 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, square off against the 
team in the state with the highest Dunkel rating, probably Western. 

Evansville gave a good account of itself early in the game, but 
faded quickly when the Maroon scoring power began to warm up. Southern 
Capt. Stinson gave his finest performance of the year, banging in seven 
field goals and five free throws for nineteen points. Stinson' s scoring 
was different from any he has done previously, since he tallied on 15 
j and 20 feet one-hand jump-shots, attempts of which he has rarely made in 
past games. 

West Frankfort's Joe Hughes turned in his second consecutive 
brilliant game. Hughes, who has finally found his scoring eye, added 
17 points to the 20 he totaled against Eastern last Saturday night. 

Saturday night Coach Lynn Holder's charges with a season's record 

! of 16 wins and three losses, will play Illinois State Normal University, 
l 
the I.I.A.C. doormat, at Normal. Southern defeated Norma i_ in the S.I.U. 

j gym, 79 to 63. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



^^j^yj^ 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - j\ class of 52 Southern Illinois 
University sociology students Thursday visited the Menard Prison at 
Chester, to study prison conditions first-hand. 

The group was accompanied by Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, professor and 
chairman of the sociology department. 

Under advance arrangements made with Warden Walter Nierstheimer , 
the class was divided into committees to study various aspects of 
prison treatment, including classification, education, medical care, 
work of the prison chaplain, and care of the criminal insane. 

The students who made the trip were: 

Alton: Thurman Watson. 

Anna: Lucille Gunn. 

Ashley: Denzel Berry. 

Benton: Victor N. Smith, Charles Fisher. 

Buckner: Berl Tate. 

Cairo: William N. Butler. 

Carbondale: Betty Bodd, Wanda Kenney, George Novak, Don Lence, 
Ruby Lence, Wanda Covington, Jane DeLap, Helen 
Perryman, Harry Grate r, Charles V. Anderson, Ella Mae 
Brinson. 

Carterville: William A. Hurley, 

Christopher: Donald Harriss. 

Chicago: Shizuko Murao, Lee Chonts, 

Cicoro: Frances Golding, 

Collinsville: J. Albert Zebio, 

Cutler: Larnz W. Bruns, 

DeSoto: Frederick J. Dietz, 

Dongola: Don Boyd. 

E. St, Louis: Russell Fairburn, 

Equality: Joseph Barnett, 

Fairfield: Robert F. Ltheridge, Gene Kingston. 
Harrisburg: Richard Dooley, 

Herrin: Leonard Burden, Kenneth L. Smith, J. J. McCarty, 

Litchfield: Nina Aikman. 

Marion: John DeLeonardo, William C. Williams, Marilyn Henderson, 
Don Morris, 



, 



Metropolis: Joe Elliott. 
Mt. Carmel: Guy C. More. 



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Mt. V e rnon: Jack Walker, 

Murphysboro: Louis Brusatti, Anna Marie Ham, Norma J^ane Nausley. 

Nashville: Paul W. Reeder. 

Royalton: Mary Kovack. 

Sparta: Doris Morgan. 

Wayne City: Gerry Edmison 

West Frankfort: Larry Gallick, John E, Arnold. 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



"Si 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-26-48 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - If habit and tradition win basket ball 
games, the Southern Illinois University Maroons should be able to give 
a :;ood account of themselves in the Illinois District playoff to be held 
in Carbondale Tuesday and Wednesday, March 2 and 3, to determine 
Illinois' entry into the National Intercollegiate Tournament (NAIB) in 
Kansas City. 

For the past three years Southern has played in the big tourney. 
In 1945 Southern first entered and succeeded in winning fourth place. 
Stars of that team were Sam Milosevich and Don Sheffer, both of Zeigler, 

Southern's second chance at the "pot-o-gold ,( championship was 
successful. V/ith Sheffer and Milosevich back from the armed forces, 
and two great players, ^uentin Stinson of Eldorado and Gene Stotlar of 
Pinckneyville, added to the roster, the Maroons, under the guidance of 
Athletic Director Glenn ?? ,abe i? Martin, won the 32-team affair. 

Victory in 1946 automatically returned Southern for the 1947 
playoffs, but this time luck was not kind to the Maroons, since they 
lost in the first game.. 

If the Maroons can take the District Championship, it will show 

once again that Southern Illinois University is the capital of the 

small college basketball in the State of Illinois, and it will send 

Southern to the Kansas City tournament for the fourth consecutive year.. 

The result will be known Tuesday and Wednesday nights when the 
team 
Southern, /composed .entirely of boys from Southern Illinois, takes on 

the best that the rest of the state has to offer* 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■■^■■■■■^^■^■■ — 



2-26-48 

Carbondale, 111* , Fob. 27 - Several Southern Illinois University 
faculty members are in St. Louis today and Saturday attending the 
national meeting of the American Association of University Professors. 

The delegation includes Prof. E. G. Lentz, professor of the 
Southern chapter of A.A.U.P.; Dr. W. C. McDaniel, secretary; Dr. J. 
Cary Davis, vice president; and Dr. ¥. M. Gersbacher, past president. 

A number of other faculty members will attend the Saturday session 
of the national meeting. 



s 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. - A Southern Illinois University alumnus, 
Robert Lewis Taylor of Carbondale, is ranked among the baker's dozen 
of "first novelists of 1947" in the Feb. 14 issue of the Saturday Review 
of Literature . 

In an article entitled "Thirteen Adventurers," Harrison Smith 
reviews and evaluates the first novels of thirteen new writers, terming 
Taylor's book Adrift in a Boneyard "comedy, fantasy, and satire all in 
one." The critic included Taylor's novel among thr^e which he said 
"revealed writers of considerable significance in a world that needs 
lightness and charm and occasional laughter," 

A series of thumbnail biographical sketches of the thirteen first 
novelists by Eloise Perry Hazard accompanies the critical article. In 
it she reports that the New York Times had listed his book on the 1947 
ten-best fiction list, 

Taylor attended Southern Illinois University from 192$ to 1933, 
lat^r graduating from the University of Illinois, He has been on the 
staff of the New Yorker since 1940, ^nd his latest book, Doctor , Lawyer . 
Merchant , Chief , is a collection of his profiles and reminiscences 
from this and other magazines. 






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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois % 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



St 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-26-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. - "The leading teams in the Little Nine 

and Pioneer Conferences seem mighty eager to come down here for the 

Illinois Intercollegiate District Tournament," remarked Southern 

Illinois University Athletic Director Glenn "Abe"' Martin. 

that 
Martin's comment was referring to the fact/ two of the participants 

who will play in the tourney which determines the Illinois 

representative to the National Tournament at Kansas City are still 

unknown. 

Southern Illinois University, I. I.- A. C. winner, and Western 
Illinois State College, yesterday announced as the team in the State 
with the highest Dunkel rating, are the only team now assured of entry. 
Both the Little Nine and. Pioneer leagues are engaged in thrilling 
stretch drives. 

Millikin and Wheat en in the Little Nine each have a 7 conference 
record with two games remaining to be played. Not until Monday night, 
when Wheat on plays Lake Forest in the final game, will the championship 
be decided. • 

Quincy and Eureka take to the hardwood Saturday night to decide thej 
dispute in the Pioneer circuit. The winner will play the winner of the 
hotly contested Little Nine at $:00 p.m. Tuesday night, March 2. 

The second game of ,the opening round Tuesday night will find 
Southern's Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champion 
Maroons pitted against Western, which has split with Southern in two 
encounters. 

If Millikin also competes in the tournament, which in effect 
determines the state college championship, Southern will be opposed by 
two of the three teams which marred the Maroons t 18-3 won-loss record.- 

Tickets for the games are ^1.20 for each session and may be 

purchased at the following places: Murphysboro, Hagler's Drug Store; 

;r est Frankfort, Mike's Cafe; Herrin, The Herrin Daily Journal ; and 

Carbondale, Smitty's Confectionary, C a pitol Barber Shop, University 
Drug Store, and the University Business Office in Shryock auditorium. 
By mail, tickets may be purchased from the Bursar, Business Office, 
^Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, by enclosing a money order 
and a stamped self-addressed envelope, ' 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois I 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. i UliMl'l HWIWIi<IW'll P^tMWWITWTillBMIII^nMnTIMMMMTin^i ^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 2-27-4$ 

Carbondale, 111,, Feb. - "It's a long, long trail''' to the 
Olympics, but some lucky team will make it and represent the United 
States in the coming Olympic Games to be held this summer in London. 

Part of the playoff to determine the team to carry the red, white, 
and blue shield will be held in Carbondale March 2 and 3 when the 
Southern Illinois University Maroons play host to the Intercollegiate 
District Tournament. 

The winner of the March 2 and 3 tournament will play in the National 
Intercollegiate (NaIB) Tournament at Kansas City the following week. 

From the thirty- tv/o teams, each a champion of its district which 
embraces one or more states from all over the United States, entered in 
that tourney, will emerge a winner. 

Another tournament will then be held to determine the United States 
entry into the Olympics. The winner of the National Intercollegiate 
Tournament (Kansas City), the winner and runnerup to the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association tournament (Madison Square Garden), 
and the outstanding team from the AAU will meet and this winner will go 
to London. 

Two teams are now assured of entry into the District tournament to 
be held in Carbondale. They are Southern and Western, who have split 
in two games, each winning on its home floor. The other teams are still 
in doubt inasmuch as the Little Nine and Pioneer league championships 
aave not been d etermined. 

Millikin or Wheaten will play for the Little Nine and Quincy or 
Eureka for the Pioneer. Both teams in both leagues are in exact ties 
Cor first place with the same number of leagues-games to be played. 

Tickets for the District play-offs may be purchased for v 1.20 each 
light at the following places: Carbondale, University Drugs, Smitty's 
'Confectionary, The Capitol Barber Shop, and the University Business Office 
'est Frankfort, Mike's Cafe; Herrin, Herrin Daily Journal; Murphysboro, 
iagler Drug Store. By mail, they may be obtained from the Bursar, 
University Business Office, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, 
ty enclosing a money order in a stamped, self-addressed envelope. 















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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



2_27-4£ 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Last chance for Southern Illinois 
basketball fans to see two outstanding Southern Illinois University 
basketball stars will be March 2 and 3 when the Maroons play in the 111 in 
Intercollegiate District Tournament at Carbondale to determine the 
Illinois representative to the National Intercollegiate Tournament the 
following week at Kansas City. 

Captain Quentin Stinson of Eldorado and guard Ollie Shoaff of Mt . 
Carmel will bow out in the tournament since it concludes the home play 
of Stinson, who has been a star for three seasons, and of Shoaff, who is 
finishing his second season as a regular* 

Stinson' s great play as center has been one of the most important 
reasons for the great success of the Maroons. During his three years, 
"Stilts" brilliant rebounding and pivot play has been vital in his team' s 
success. He is also the only remaining member of the team which won the 
National Intercollegiate championship in 1946 when he was acclaimed secern 
team Ail-American. With his passing, it is possible that the end of an 
era-a truly brilliant era-will be upon Southern Illinois University 
basketball. Southern has won the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference championship during each of the years Stinson has played. 

Ollie Shoaff transferred to Southern at the beginning of his junior 
/ear in time for the 1946-47 basketball schedule. Previously Shoaff had 
lettered with the 1942 University of Illinois Whiz Kids and served in the 
army. So familiar have become Shoaf f T s long, dangerous one-hand shots, 
:hat every time he starts to "get set" for a shot, a hush comes over the 
:rowds. The Tournament March 2 and 3 will be the last time for People to 
-hrill to the sudden stilling of the gym and roar with delight when the 
let is ripped by the ball. 

These men will be so desperately hard to replace next year. Last 
•haaice for fans to see one of Southern Illinois University's greatest 
:eams, with Stinson and Shoaff will be March 2 and 3. 

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Southern Illinois 



■! ■ ■■■— ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IP Willi ■UUMUIMIIII HIM i MH IMII1MB— I 



» 



3-1-43 

Carbondale, 111., March - The three leading national teacher 
education organizations have combined in a single, unified organization 
to be known as the American association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education, President Chester F. Lay of Southern Illinois University 
has been notified. 

Southern has belonged to the American Association of Teachers 
Colleges, one of the merging groups. President Lay attended the joint 
meeting of this organization, the National Association of Colleges and 
Departments of Education, and the National Association of Teacher 
Education Institutions in Metropolitan Districts, held last year at 
Chautauqua, N. Y. , at which plans were laid for the new organization. 

The new organization, embracing some 260 colleges and universities, 
began functioning at a recent meeting in Atlantic City, N. J. Southerns 
official delegates to the meeting were Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, acting 
dean of the College of Education, and John I-iees, principal of University 
High School. Two other Southern faculty members, attended in an unoffici; 
capacity, Dr. Howard Bosley, and Dr. Earl Kail* 

The new organization, which will operate as a department of the 
National Education Association, will be headed by Dr. Walter E. Hager, 
president of Wilson Teachers College, Washington, D.C. 

"This organization strengthens teacher training all over the 
United States," commented Southern President Lay in discussing the new 
association. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois i 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



*l 



3-1-46 

Carbondale, 111., March - Southern Illinois University has been 
accorded a charter for a chapter of the National Collegiate Players, 
one of the three outstanding honorary dramatic organizations in the 
country, Dr. P. M. Larson, chairman of the University speech department, 
has announced. 

A list of the Southern students admitted to charter membership will 
be announced later, Dr. Larson said. 

This organization is an exclusive one, composed of only about 1+0 
of the outstanding colleges and universities in the country which are 
active in dramatics, Dr. Laws on explained. 

Installation of the new chapter will be conducted by Prof. Howard 
C. Morgan of Larlham College, Richmond, IncL, though the date has not 
been set. 

Dr. Archibald McLeod, associate professor of speech, who was 
affiliated with National Collegiate Players while he was a member of the 
faculty of Texas State College for Women, will be the active sponsor of 
the new chapter here. 

Students admitted to charter membership will include those who 
have achieved outstanding activity in the Little Theatre, Southern's 
student dramatic organization, Dr. Larson pointed out. 

777/7/''//' 

Carbondale, 111., March - Dr. liaurits Kesnar, professor and 

chairman of the music department at Southern Illinois University, has 

been invited to lead a session at the music clinic at Marion Friday 
afternoon, March 5« 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IMIillllllllllWIIIIIllllMIIIMI— I lllMT—HWll 



Attention: Sports Editors 3-1-43 

For Tuesday Release: 

Carbondale, 111., Mar. - The Illinois Intercollegiate District 
Tournament, which decides the Illinois representative to the NaIB 
tournament next week at Kansas City, gets under way Tuesday at B:00 p.m. 
when James Millikin University, Little Nine champion, takes on .uincy of 
the Pioneer league, at 9:30 p.m. the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons will take the floor against Western Illinois. 

Hillikin and Quincy earned the right to compete in this playoff 
over the week by winning their conferences, but Millikin especially is 
respected as a powerful team, having once handed Lynn Holder's Southern 
Illinois University Maroons a decisive defeat. 

VJestern is in the playoff by virtue of having the highest Dunkel 
Rating in the state, while Southern gained admittance by capturing its 
third straight Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title. 

Southern's Maroons are favored to win the tournament, but only by 
a narrow margin. Two teams, Western and Millikin, have defeated the 
Maroons on their home floors. And Millikin is the only college team to 
defeat Southern in Carbondale for three years, having turned the trick 
in December, 1946. 

The tourney Tuesday and Wednesday will be the last appearance of the 
Maroons until next December when a new team will wear the maroon and 
white. Missing from the team next year will be the great Captain 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, one of Southern's all-time stars, and 
clever, long-shot Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel. 

Stinson has been red hot in the last three games, and undoubtedly 
hopes to make his farewell appearance a memorable one. 

The winners of the two first-round games will meet Wednesday at 
6:00 p.m. in the finals. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




3-2-43 

Carbondale, 111., March -Southern Illinois rural people want theii 
children educated in rural schools, but in large well-equipped rural 
schools, a Southern Illinois University survey reveals. 

A public opinion poll among more than 2500 rural arid village school 
patrons in six counties, conducted by graduate students under the 
direction of Dr. Earl R. Hall, assistant professor of education, shows: 

(1) $6 per cent think school reorganization would be a good move 
for their community. 

(2) 87 per cent prefer their children to attend a large well-equippe 
school in a rural area, rather than a good city school. 

The questionnaire was conducted in six counties--Hardin, Pope, 
Williamson, Jackson, Johnson, and Franklin. Graduate students at the 
University distributed the questionnaire with the cooperation of school 
survey committee members in each county. Of 3>000 questionnaires 
distributed, approximately 33 percent were filled out and returned,, 

Nearly four-fifths of the school patrons polled in the six counties 
replied "yes" to the question "Have you ever given thought to the 
reorganization of schools?" 

"It is evident that many people need more information and the better 
informed they are, the more favorable they are toward school reorganizatic 
Hall said, 

"In counties wh ere school survey committees have been working for 
about two years, holding public meetings to explain their proposals and 
calk over the problems of the school, the people are more favorable to 
school reorganization than in the counties where survey studies are just 
starting. 

"For example, in Jackson County, where the survey has just started, 
33 per cent of the people were uninformed about school reorganization, 
compared to the six-county average of 21 per cent." 

(More) 












One of the outstanding facts found in the poll is that "the rural 
oeopie want to remain rural," Dr. Hall pointed out. 

"They are not opposed to consolidation or reorganization as loner as 
the school is located somewhere in the country. They seem to favor the 
organization of a good eight-teacher country school because it will 
provide better educational opportunities for their children than they ere 
now getting in the many one-teacher schools. 

"A big majority think better schools can be had by reorganization, 
suggesting better teachers, hot lunch programs, health programs, music 
and art instruction, better equipment, as reasons for their view." 

thi)Tt7 






Carbondale , 111., March -About sixty art minded Southern Illinoisc 
net recently at the home of Mr, and Mrs. William Hine in De Soto, to 
complete plans for the organization of the Southern Illinois Art Associati 

A constitution was adopted which "provides that: "The Southern Illino 
.rt Association shall have as its purpose the encouragemnt of art in 
Southern Illinois." 

Officers of the association, elected at the meeting to serve for term 
if one year, are: president, Eleanore Ballwig of Mt . Vernon; vice preside 
ion Morris of Marion; treasurer, Maryanne Hine of De Soto; and executive 
secretary, Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the art department at Southern 
llinois University, Carbondale.. 

The formation of general policies to implement the purpose of the 
<ew association will be determined by a board of directors, composed of th< 
'ollowing: "Roscoe Misselhorn, Sparta; Mrs. W.C. McDaniel, Carbondale; 
ucian Hill, Marion; Dr. Archibald McLeod, Southern Illinois University, 
arbondcle; Jack Batts, West Frankfort; Mrs. T .".H. Wallace, Marion; and 
heodore Mueller, Chester. 

Emily Farnham, art instructor at Southern Illinois University, directs 

discussion on "Modern Movements in Fainting" at the De Soto meeting. 

The first of a series of lectures sponsored by the association will be 
r Kenneth Smith, nationally known ceramicist. Mr'. Smith will apnear at 
juthern Illinois University Wednesday, May 17, for a series of lectures 
.id demonstrations on the materials and techniques of making pottery. Mr. 
pith is associated with the American Art Clay Company and was for many 
iars head of the Mewcomb College (Tulane University)' ceramics department 
1 New Orleans . 

The next meeting of the association will be in the Appellate Court 
uilding in Mt . Vernon, Sunday, Arril 24th, at 2:00 p.m. 

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1/ 




Southern Illinois J 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois i 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. aWEBEI^HBB^BBBBHHBBSaiHIHBaBBBBBHiMlH 



3-4-A8 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., March -Southern Illinois University's great 
Maroon team will represent Illinois in the National Intercollegiate (NAI 
Tournament at Kansas City next week by virtue of winning the Illinois 
District of the NAIB playoffs held here Tuesday and Wednesday. 

The Holdermen battled through to the final victory in a thrilling 
61 to 58 win over superb James Millikin University. The issue was in 
doubt until the final 10 seconds of play when a field goal by Jack Long 
of Flora ended the scoring. 

This will be the fourth consecutive year that the Maroons have 
played in the National tournament. By winning over Millikin in the 
finals, Southern also added the college basketball championship of 
Illinois to the state football championship won last November by defeat i] 
North Central in the Corn Bowl. 

Ollie Shoaff of Mt . Carmel and Captain Quentin St ins on of Eldorado, 
both star seniors, were named to the playoff All-Star team, Shoaff also 
being chosen co-captain along with Scott Steagall of Millikin. 

Shoaff played the greatest basketball of his brilliant career in 
his final bow before Southern Illinois audiences. Stinson, who has been 
a brilliant three-year t regular and was named on the second All-America 
team at Kansas City in 1946 when Southern won the National Intercollegiat 
championship, captured scoring honors in the final game with 13 points. 

The Maroon team this year is fully as good as the one which won 
the Kansas City Tournament two years ago. Even though the caliber of 
competition has improved greatly in the last two years, the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champions have maintained an even 
better record, winning 21 against only 3 losses. Each team which 
defeated Southern has subsequently lost to the Maroons in turn. 

Averaging 65 points a game, Southern is definitely an offensive 
team, but coupled with this high-powered scoring has been an alert 
defense in the clutch. 

(More) 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. II i l llll ■ I lilHI'H ■Hill H I I II ! I III IWIIIHWf ■ i r W MMllilMIMffl 



3-4-43 

Carbondale, 111., March -An exhibition of paintings by members 
of the Pyramid Group of New York City is currently on view in the Little 
Gallery at Southern Illinois University, according to Kenneth Ervin, 
instructor in the Art Department. 

This exhibition, to be on display throughout March, is composed of 
works shown at the Riverside Museum in New York during November of the 
past year, and is being circulated among colleges and universities 
throughout the country. 

The Pyramid Group was organized in 1947 to afford greater opportunit 
for exhibition of works by young painters, sculptors, and graphic artists 
Ervin explained. 

"The members of the group, in their manifesto, stated the belief the 
in the whole world today, only America offers any encouragement toward 
complete freedom of expression necessary to the creative artist, and that 
cooperation between individual artists is essential in order to arouse 
and maintain interest in art as a form of expression." 

Members of the Pyramid Group, while mainly residing in New York 
City, hail from such widely divergent locales as New Mexico, Oklahoma, 
Virginia, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Idaho. At least two members were 
born and received most of their training in Europe, one being a native 
of Norway and another in Vienna. 

Among the score of paintings now hanging in Old Main, Mr. Ervin 
cited for particular attention such works as "Family Group", by George 
Morrison, a Minnesotan whose drawings were exhibited in the Gallery 
during January; "Girl Painting", by Louis Finkeistein, a native of New 
York City; "The Float", by Carl Nesjar, a young Norwegian; "Monhegan 
Abstraction," by Hyde Solomon; and "Chorale," by Paul England, an 
Oklahoman. 

Also included in the exhibition is one painting by Mr. Ervin, 
finished since his arrival here in September, and entitled, "Msgic 
Garden," 

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Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■HHmHHHMBMMHMHHlHIH 



3-4-48 *jf 

Carbondale, 111., March -Final examinations will begin for 
winter term students at Southern Illinois University next Tuesday, 
March 9. 

Last of the exams will be held Friday afternoon, March 12, and 
students will take off for a nine-day spring recess. 

The one-day registration for the spring term will be held Monday, 
March 22, with classes beginning Tuesday, March 23 ♦ 



Carbondale, 111., March -All public health nurses in Southern 
Illinois will gather here at Southern Illinois University March 15-16 
to discuss cancer control, Ralph H. Boatman, University health 
co-ordinator has announced. 

Miss Rosalie Peterson, Division of Cancer Control, U.S. Public 
Health Service, will serve as a consultant for the two-day meeting. 

Sessions will be held in the Little Theatre. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-5-43 

Carbondale, 111., March - The library of Southern Illinois 
; University is being expanded considerably more rapidly than the average 
gain for libraries all over the country, reports Miss Opal Stone, acting 
librarian. 

Durin^ the past six months, a total of 3,411 volumes have been 
added to the Southern library shelves, a „ain of 4.2 per cent, to push 
its total holdings to $4,143 volumes, Miss Stone pointed out in her 
annual report just issued. This total does not include 5,697 pamphlets 
in the curriculum library, she added. 

"The average University library doubles every 16 years, if Miss Stone 
wrote in her report. "This University is increasing its holdings at a 
much faster pace." 

If acquisitions could be continued at the rate shown during the 
past six months, the Southern library would double in approximately 12 
years, rather than 16. 

Acquisitions during the past six months include 2,154 books and 
pamphlets, 234 documents, 32 bound magazines, all for the general 
library; 763 volumes for the University High School library; 171 volumes 
for the elementary school library; and 57 volumes for the curriculum 
library. 

The University receives 946 magazines, 103 newspapers, and five 
newspapers -in-* microfilm. 

Library circulation during 1947 totaled 145,416, an increase of 
2£,369 over 1946, or an average monthly increase of 2,664, the report 
shows. 

Opening during 1947 of the new reference room— a temporary barracks 
building added to the library—had made it possible to seat 120 
additional students, thus greatly aleviating the library space shortage, 
Miss Stone explained. 

Stack space for periodicals and documents is critical, however. 
Room is not available for the extensive expansion needed to provide 
adequate library resources for the present large enrollment of students 
and to develop library holdings commensurate with Southerns new 
University status and the institution's prospective future growth. 

Rearrangement of book-dispensing facilities and addition of 
library personnel has substantially improved the library service to 
students and faculty, the report shows. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-5-43 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., March -D-Day, H-Hour for the Illinois college 
champions of Southern Illinois University is Sunday, March 7 at 4:30 a.m 
when the Maroons of Coach Lynn Holder will entrain for Kansas City, Mo. 
to participate in the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball 
tourney running from March 8 to 13 « 

Southern's great team, owners of a 21-3 record, will play their fir: 
game Tuesday afternoon against an opponent which has not yet been 
designated* Thirty-two teams from all parts of the nation will enter, 
each hoping for the glory-laden title as "National Intercollegiate 
Basketball Champions » ?T 

The Holdermen will enter as an exceptionally well-balanced quintet. 
They have some height, though Quentin Stinson of Eldorado at 6'4 ?T is 
the tallest man. Also, Southern has speed, every man on the team being 
fast, with guards Ollie Shoaff of Mt , Carmel and Jack Eadie of West 
Frankfort being exceptionally quick. Long-shooting ability is present 
in the ever-dangerous one-handers of Shoaff. 

Joe Hughes of West Frankfort and Bob Colborn of Flora are balanced 
forwards, each standing a little over 6 T l ?f but working better as 
rebounders than their height would indicate. Both men also score well 
from near the basket. 

Total scoring for the season is remarkable well distributed. Four 
regulars have scored over 240 points in the 24 games to pile up season 
averages of over 10 points per game. Colborn is the scoring leader with 
2£9 tallies, and is followed by Eadie' s 257(in 22 games), Shoaff ' s 251, 
and Stinson T s 243* Hughes, who scored poorly early in the season, has 
rallied recently and is nearly over the 200-point hump with 196. 

Over the entire season the Maroons have scored 1555 points, which 
comes to a highly respectable average per game of 64,8. 



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nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 







BULLETIN 

Carbondale > 111,, March 9 -Southern Illinois University.. 54-50 
winner over Southern Oregon in the first round of the Kansas City- 
basket ball tournament, will face Manhattan College at 2s40 'p*m* 
Wednesday in the second round. The game will be broadcast over Station 
WCILj Carbondale, 1020 k.c, 

Manhattan won Tuesday afternoon over Arkansas State 63-60 in a 
first round encounter. 



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Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. «^«WHHSB«K«^HHMBn^^^ 



3-11-48 
Carbondale, 111., March - Dr. Vera L. Peacock, professor and 
chairman of the foreign language department at Southern Illinois 
University, is the author of an article "Foreign Languages in Teacher 
Training Institutions, 1 ' published in the March issue of The Modern 
Language Journal * 

MM 

Carbondale, 111., March 12 - Several Southern Illinois University 
faculty members are attending the State Rural Education Conference in 
Springfield today and tomorrow. 

Dr. Howard E. Bosley, associate professor of education, is appearing 
on the program of the conference, and George Bracewell, associate 
professor of education, Mrs. Bernice Sickman and Mrs. Lora Bosley, 
critic teachers, are in attendance. 



Carbondale, 111., March 11 - Deans from Southern Illinois 
University attended the dean's conference yesterday and today in 
conjunction with the annual meeting of the North Central Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools in Chicago. 

Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions; 
Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of men and acting dean of the College of 
Education; Dr. T. W, Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal arts and 
Sciences; and Dr. Willis G. Swartz, chairman of the Graduate Studies 
Committee, represented Southern at the meeting. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Carbondale, 111*, -Registration for the spring term at Southern 
Illinois University will be for one day only, Monday March 22, according 
to Marjorie Shank, Registrar* 

Anyone who is not registered for tie winter term or who is registeri 
for the first time must make application for admission at the Registrar's 
office. 

Several new courses are being offered for the spring term* "Audio 
Visual Methods in Education" will be offered by Donald A* Ingli, director 
of the Audio Visual Education Service. The foreign language department 
is extending credit for conversational French and Spanish to be taught 
by Mrs. Jacqueline Elliott, French-born wife of a student Veteran, and 
Jose Reyes, graduate student from Mexico, New courses in the social 
studies field are "Problems in Recent Economic History" from Dr. 
William Pitkin, associate professor of social studies; and "Current 
Sociological Journals" from Dr, Joseph K. Johnson, chairman of the 
sociology department. 






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LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BH^nBBaHaBnBHHHBMBBBBHaaHMBMBI 






Attention: Sports Editors 3-12-48 

Carbondale, 111,, March - Although the Southern Illinois 

University Maroons fell in defeat to Manhattan Colle._e of Mew York 

City in the second round of the National Association of Intercollegiate 

Basketball tourney at Kansas City last Wednesday by a 52 to 42 score, 

Coach Lynn Holder's charges and Southern supporters can remember 

proudly a season which ended with 22 wins against a mere four defeats. 

The Holdermen won the I. I. A. C. title for the third consecutive 

year, losing only one conference game to Western, whom the Maroons 

defeated twice by decisive scores. Other games were lost to teams 

to 
which alse lost twice/the Southern team, Evansville and Millikin. 

The I. I. a. C. champs again maintained an enviable record of 
home play, O oing undefeated for the third time in four years, and have 
now lost only one game to a college team on the Southern floor in the 
last four campaigns. 

At Kansas City the Maroons played below the par they had 
demonstrated during the regular Illinois ca_e season. The greatest 
difficulty with the Holder men was their lack of ability to make shots* 
Most of the time the rebounding was satisfactory, the passing clean, 
and the floor play smooth. But the shot-making was off terribly. 

Even though the Maroons failed to regain the National Intercollegiat 
Championship they won in 1946, a spirit of "well done 1 ' prevades the 
home of the 194# Illinois college champions whose batting average in the 
National tournament is still 250-one championship in four consecutive 
attempts. 

Capt. Quentin Stinson of Eldorado and Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel 
closed out their college careers for the Maroons at Kansas City. Both 
of these stars, Stinson, the courageous rebounder and leader, and 
Shoaff, the sensational one-hand lon shot, will be sorely missed next 
year, a fact indicated by the naming of these men to Collegiate Ma ^azingj 
Class B All-Midwest All-Star team. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 3-12-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., March - The Ides of March will not find the 
Southern Illinois University baseball team in Dixie on a spring- 
training trip as had been planned. 

A notice on the gymnasium bulletin board tells the story: "Trip 
south cancelled--heavy rains fell Wednesday in Mississippi and 
Louisiana--cold wave moving South. Sorry boys. — Glenn Martin." 

Maroon Athletic Director and Baseball Coach Glenn "Abe*"' Martin 
indicated, howe\er, that Southern would continue practicing indoors 
until the blanket of snow has left the ground and Old Sol provides 
the heat necessary to bake the kinks out of throwing arms. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-24-42 

Carbondale, 111., March - A total of 2,42$ students have enrolled 
at Southern Illinois University for the spring term, according to the 
Bursar's Office. 

While this figure is slightly below the 2,477 enrolled for the 
spring term of 1947, it is expected that by the end of the week, 
deadline for registration without loss of credit, the current enrollment 
will equal that of a year ago. 

Registration for the spring term was completed in one day this 
spring, and classes started on Tuesday morning, with several hundred 
late comers paying fees yesterday and today. Reorganization of the 
registration machinery permitted well over 2,000 students to complete 
the enrollment process during the one day. 

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Carbondale, 111., March - A brand new game --combining features 
of volley ball and lawn tennis--has been invented by a Southern Illinois 
University physical education professor and is attracting considerable 
attention in physical education circles. 

Called volley tennis, the game was first trieo out some ten years 
ago by Leland P. L ingle,, associate professor of physical education at 
Southern, and has been developed during the ensuing years in play by 
Southern students. 

To be played on a court 36 by 7$ feet, volley tennis is adaptable 
to both large and small groups, since it may be played by as few as 
four players or as many as ten. 

Lingle has reported on the new game to the Illinois health, Physical 
Education and Recreation Association, and an article describing it will 
appear in the association's journal shortly. 

An article on the new game appears in the February issue of the 
trade magazine, "The Coach, '' published in Kansas City. 

tfiffr 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 3-24-4# 

Carbonds.le , 111., March - Although the Southern Illinois Universit 
Maroon track squad has had only three days of practice, and that with 
the hindrance of damp grounds, observers of the cinder-men ere optimistii 
about their prospects for a very successful season. 

Veteran Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle is starting his twenty-second 
year at the helm of the I-iaroon tr£ ck and field crew with a solid basis 
of 14 lettermen plus a liberal sprinkling of promising freshmen. 

V/eather problems constitute Lingle' s greatest worry: on the turn 
of the weather depends much of the squad's hores for early success in 
the schedule of seven dual meets and the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference meet in which Southern pieced second lest veer. 

Captain George 3eltz of Marion, crack middle distance runner, heads 
up the returning lettermen. Others are: Carl Birkner, Finckneyville ; 
Leonard Burden, Herrin; Jim Cole, Norris City; Norris Garner, Clay City; 
Bill Kayse, Benton; Truman Kill, Benton; Bob Luetzow, Chicago; Charles 
Mathieu, Eldorado; Bob Neighbors, Belleville; Richard Newby, Farmer 
City; Mike Sortal, Zeigler; Quentin Stinson, Eldorado; and Adrain 
Stonecipher, Calem. 

From Belleville come four very highly regarded freshmen; Joe Budde, 
sprints; James Pflaster, hurdles; Ray Falmer, distance runs; and Bill 
Brown, middle distance. 

Two newcomers from Carbondale, Joe McLafferty and Buddy Miller, add 
depth and brilliance to the distance running groups. Both have lettered 
in cross-country, and McLafferty is the already Southern's all-time threat 
in cross-country. In the 1947 Illinois High School State Track Meet, 
this fleet freshman from Southern's University High School finished 
second in 4.27. 

Three new hurdlers ma]/" give the Maroons great strength in this 
department. They are: Joe Hughes of 'est Frankfort, who has previously 
created outstanding football and basketball reputations, Andy Anderson, 
an erstwhile Texan who has two letters from McKendree, and Jack Neal of 
Sparta . 

Lingle f s outstanding task will be to work these men, and possibly 
unheralded others, into a well balanced team. And Lingle is noted among 
track circles for doing just that. 






1 1 ■> ••' 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-24-43 

Carbondale, 111., March - Mrs. Mary Agnes Starr of Cairo, 
interpreter of French-Canadian Folk Songs, will be presented in a 
lecture-recital, "The Voyageurs in Song end Story," at Southern Illinois 
University March 31. 

Her performance will be given in the Little Theatre at 8 F. M., and 
will be open to the public. 

Mrs. Starr has become widely known throughout the Middle '.'Jest 
for her performances of the play songs, lullabies, carols and other 
melodies she learned from her French Canadian grandmother and other 
relatives . 

She appears in traditional French-Canadian costume and sings with 
auto harj accompaniment. 

Mrs. Starr is being brought to the Southern c amrus by the foreign 
language and music departments, and will appear during the day before 
music and language classes, according to Br. Vera Feacock, chairman of 
the foreign language department. 

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Carbondale, 111,, March - Floyd V. Wakeland, associate professor 
of music at Southern Illinois University, has been invited to serve as 
guest director of two music festivals in April and as chorus director 
of a third festival, according to Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College 
of Vocations and Professions. 

Wakeland will direct the music festival at Care Girardeau, Mo., 
April 8 and 9 and the festival at West Frankfort April 23. On Anril 28 
he will direct a music chorus at Gillespie c 

intrrir 
Carbonaale, 111., Flarch - Dr. Howard E. Bosley, associate prof esse 
of education at Southern Illinois University this week addressed the 
Rotary Club at Golconda, speaking on the subject, "The Feed for Larger 
School Districts in Illinois." 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-25-4S 

Carbondale, 111., March - The U. S. Public Health Service has 
doubled its former assistance in support of research work being carried 
on by Dr. Carl C. Lindegren, director of the new biological science 
research laboratory ar Southern Illinois University, University Presiden 
Chester F, Lay has announced. 

The federal agency, on recommendation of the National Advisory 
Cancer Council, has issued a grant of % >10,000 to Southern in support 
of Dr. Lindegren' s investigations. Last year the U.S. Public Health 
Service contributed ^5,000 to support Dr. Lindegren' s work at 
Washington University in St. Louis. 

Recently Dr. Lindegren, who has carried on basic research into 
the nature of cells by studying yeast, discovered a variety of red 
yeast which lost its color but which could have its color restored by 
proper mating. 

This color loss, or "depletion mutation,'' Dr. Lindegren believes, 
may indicate a whole new concept of genetics and may cast light on 
the problem of cancer by affording a new key to the cell's transmission 
of hereditary characteristics from one generation to another. 

It is the continuation of this investigation of Dr. Lindegren' s 
that the U. S. Public Health Service has extended its new 010*000 
grant to support. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



















































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and two gold medals which its speech delegation won at the recent 
sectional speech meet at Greenville, according to John Mees, principal. 

One of the banners was awarded to U. High as high-point school in 
the sectional meet in B Class, the other was as winner of first lolace 
in dramatics, B Class ,' having presented the play "Trifles." 

Virda Sil] from U. High won first place in comedy reading, B Class, 
and second place in the entire sectional meet in this event. She will 
go to the State finals at Champaign April 16-17 ♦ 

Milton Ewert took first place in original oratory, B Class. Both 
Ewert and Miss Sill won gold medals. 

Members of the B Class winning play c ast were Russell Peithman, 
Herbert Rieke , Charles Tucker, Dorothy Patterson, and Virda Sill. 

Speech activities in University H-,-gh School are taught and directed 
by Mrs. Eleanor Young. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., March -Four Southern Illinois University 
student personnel workers will attend the meeting of the American 
College Personnel Association convening simultaneously with the National 
Council of Guidance and Personnel Associations, in Chicago March 29- 
April 1, 

Those who will attend are Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of men; 
Mrs. Alice Rector, instructor snd assistant to the student life deans; 
Ledford Bischof, instructor and assistant to the dean of men; and Miss 
Maxine Vogely, director of Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory. 






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::s 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 3-25-42 

Carbondale, 111., March - The presence of only six lettermen 
on a squad of sixty has not encouraged Southern Illinois University 
Athletic Director and Baseball Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin to be very 
optimistic over the prospects for a winning season. 

The outstanding returnees from last year's first Southern diamond 
crew are Captain George Sawyer of Wood River and Sill Bleyer of 
Carterville, outfielder and second baseman, respectively. 

The outstanding baseball characteristic of both men is an ability 
to bend a wicked willow, both having hit over .400 a year ago. They 
also hit for long distances, Sawyer f rom t he right side and Bleyer 
from the portside. 

Other lettermen are Charlie Durham of West Frankfort, shortston, 
who will team with Bleyer to provide a veteran keystone combination, 
Harry "Bud" Grater, Carbondale pitcher, southpaw Leon Sitter of Cobden, 
who guarded first last year but will try the mound this spring, and 
right-handed moundsman Bernard Heiligenstein of Freeburg, 

Highly regarded newcomers who will be fighting for a regular 
position are: pitchers --Marion Moake of Marion and Don Ragsdale of 
DeSoto; catchers--Bob Goalby of Belleville, Raymond Kuykendall of 
Steeleville, and Richard Jones of Gillespie; firstbase, Ro^^ Leilich of 
New Athens, and Don Glover and Arch Blackard of Mt . Vernon; second 
base--William Elder of Eldorado; shortstop-- Jesse Payne of Ullin; third 
base--John Goss of Marion, Bill Bonali of Freeman Spur, William Staple 
of Shawneetown, and Charles Brockett of West Frankfort; outf ield--Bob 
Johnson of DuQuoin, Pete Milosevich of Zeigler; Jim Becker of Evansville, 
111., Ed Kerr of Carbondale, Dick Seelman of Flora, and Elmo Ricci 
of Johnston City. 

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) 



." ■ ' , _ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-26-4£ 

Carbondale , 111., March - Cecil Bolton, instructor in music at 
Southern Illinois University, will be presented in a piano concert in 
Shryock Auditorium Monday evening, April 5, at 8 p. m. , Dr. Maurits 
Kesnar, chairman of the music department, has announced. 

Bolton joined the University faculty last fall, coming; from Murray 
State Teachers College, Murray, Ky« 

A widely acclaimed young pianist and organist, Mr. Bolton has 
given concerts throughout the southern and midwestern states and has 
played at Carnegie Hall in New York City, the University of Chicago, 
Baylor University, the University of Oklahoma. He has twice served 
as soloist with the Jacksonville (Fla.) Philharmonic Orchestra, and has 
served as director of religious music for the radio programs of 
Jacksonville radio stations. 

He has served as organist-choirmaster at the Church of the Good 
Shepard in Jacksonville, at the Calvary Baptist Church, Jackson, and 
at the Snyder Memorial Methodist Church. 

Mr. Bolton graduated from the University of Mississippi, obtained 
the master's degree from the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, 
and has studied under Marcel Dupre , noted French teacher and Bach 
authority, and under Allen Spencer. 

His concert here April 5 will be open to the public, without charge, 

iHHHt 






Carbondale, 111., March - Three Southern Illinois musical units 
will perform before the district convention of Rotary Clubs at 
Pinckneyville April 7-3, according to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, music 
department chairman. 

The costumed Madrigal Singers, directed by Floyd V. Wake land, 
associate professor of music, will sing at 2:20 p.m. April 7; the 
University Choir, also directed by Mr. Wakeland, will sing that evening; 
and the University Band, directed by Harold C. Hines, instructor in 
music, will play in the parade on April 3. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



"f 



Attention: Sports Editors 3-26-^8 

Carbondale, 111., March - Captain George Sawyer, slugging 
outfielder of the Southern Illinois University Maroons, has decided to 
forego spring baseball *and will report to the Hew York Yankee's Joplin, 
Missouri, farm club Api*"il 4 for spring trail mg, 

Sawyer, who hails ffron Wood River, hit over .400 for the Maroons in 
1947, his first season of college ball. His absence will be strongly 
felt among the Maroons , vho are especially wesl$ on experienced 
ballplayers . 

In reporting for "professional baseball with the Class C club, 
Sawyer gives up elig3.bi.Mty for football next ffcll. Southern's most 
brilliant break-away ru mer en the 1947 Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference anc Corn Bowl Champions, this powerful $' 10" 
190 pounder will tu.m lis talents to "gardening." 

A junior in th«e Ccllege of Education, Sawyer intends to continue 
work toward his de.'gree during the fall and winter months. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. "'"^'■■■■■ MHWWM " I ^ M " M "" BM 



For Tuesday Release 3-29-4$ 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., March - The annual knif e-and-f ork athletic 
circuit is keeping Southern Illinois University Athletic Director 
Glenn "Abe" Martin in good food and good voice. 

"Abe" has 15 banquet speaking engagements within the next 30 days 
in addition to coaching the Maroon b aseball team, directing the other 
athletics, and teaching a regular load of classes. 

Martin will appear in Golconda on Monday night, and will attend 
the banquet for the Southern Illinois University Maroons given by 
Ralph Johnson of Carbondale on Tuesday night. 

After a Wednesday night vacation, he will return to the after- 
dinner chores at Maris sa, Thursday, and Litchfield, Friday. And as if 
that isn't enough, Saturday his Maroon diamond crew open their season 
against Arkansas State in Jonesboro, Ark f 

3-29-48' 

Carbondale, 111., March -With his fingers crossed, Southern 
Illinois University Track Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle is anxiously 
watching all available barometers, weather-vanes, thermoneters , and 
anemometers . 

The twenty-two year veteran of the Maroon cindermen is really 
"sweating out" the weatherman. Thus far in the year, he has had only 
about three good days for drills, and he feels his boys are not as far 
along as they should be. 

"Doc" has high hopes of capturing the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference t n ck championship by winning the conference meet 
which will be held in Carbondale May 21-22. But to win, as Southern 
did in 1946, "Doc" knows that it's going to be lots of work, and the 
work requires lots of good weather. 

But "Doc" isn't the only person on the Southern campus who is eager 

for bright, shiny days. So would Baseball Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin, who 

has not yet had an opportunity to get in any practice licks beyond mere 
throwing and fielding practice. 

The only consolation of these men is that perhaps the mud is just 
as deep on other campuses, and perhaps, just perhaps, the other schools 
are not very far ahead of them in conditioning, 

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Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. mwmmnmmM^ imaimi i ILmii j miim ^ mmm ^_ m _ immi ^ mimi ^^^ m A 



3-29-4S 

Carbondale, 111., March - A new course in photography has been 
opened at Southern Illinois University this spring, £ nd has attracted 
an enrollment of 12 students. The course is taught by Robert A. Steffes 
acting chairman of the journalism department, who reports that the 12 
students constitute a full enrollment in view of the nature of the 
course and the equipment available. 

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Carbondale, 111., March -The seal of approval of the American 
Association of University Women has been given to the new bachelor of 
music degree at Southern Illinois University, according to the latest 
A.A.U.W. Journal . 

The new degree, recently approved by the American Association of 
Schools of Music, is a professional degree, established to train 
students for professional careers in music. 

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Carbondale, 111., March - Robert W, English, assistant professor 
of industrial educe tion at Southern Illinois University, has an article, 
"A Drafting Kit for Home and School,' 1 published in the March issue of 
Industrial Arts and Vocational Education Magazine. 

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Southern Illinois 



pi^ ^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. iiiimiiiimhiim iiiiim ■! 



Carbondale, 111,, March - Appointment of three nev; persons to the 
summer term f acuity at Southern Illinois University has been announced 
by University Fresident Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Kenneth W, Wegner has been appointed associate professor of 
mathematics. He holds the bachelor's, master's and doctor T s degrees 
from the University of Wisconsin, and has taught at Wisconsin, Whitworth 
College, the University of Minnesota and Carleton College, 

Karry F. Jackson has been named associate professor of history, 
Mr. Jackson, who holds the bachelor's degree from Marshall College and 
the master's degree from West Virginia University, is completing his 
work on the doctor of philosophy degree at the University of Chicago 
this spring. A member of the faculty at Stephens College, on leave 
at present for his doctoral study, he has also taught at the University 
of Chicago. 

Miss Mabel Carney has been appointed professor of education, to 
direct summer workshops. M^ss Carney has had a distinguished c areer 
in rural education. She received her t raining at Columbia University 
and taught at both Western Illinois State College and at Illinois State 
Normal University before going to Columbia where she was professor of 
education until her retirement. 

Resignation of Arthur Halfar, recorder in the Office of the Registrs 
was also announced. Mr. Halfar, whose resignation will become effective 
at the end of the current school year, plans to devote his time to 
completing work on the master's degree. 

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Carbondale, 111., March T The Sectional Latin Contest will be 
held here on the campus of Southern Illinois University April 17, to 
select candidates to go to the State tournament at the University 01 
Illinois May 8, according to Mrs. Evelyn Rieke, language instructor 
in University High School 

The competitive contest will be held in the Allyn Building. 

Four University High School contestants who received superior ratinr 
for Latin I and II in the district meeting at Harrisburg recently will 
be eligible for competition in the April 17 sectional meet here. They 
are Harriet Briggs ana leter Kesnar for Latin II and Norma Dot 1 ' and 
Herbert Rieke for Latin I. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



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Carbondale, 111., March -"What Makes a Good High School" was 
the subject of a radio talk given here this week by John Mees, principal 
of University High School at Southern Illinois University, whip listed tn 
following qualifications: 

1. An educational philosophy which promotes the principles and 
spirit of democracy, and which is specifically stated, 

2. A curricular and extra-curricular program which meets the needs 
and interests of the pupils. 

3. An excellent library which serves as the center of the 
educational life of the school, 

4. A well-organized guidance program, 

5. Evidence that teachers and pupils are happily cooperating in 
the stimulation of a wholesome curiosity about themselves and their 
environment, 

6. A competent and well-trained staff, 

7. An attractive and appropriate building, 

$. A capable administrator to coordinate the entire educational 
program, 

9. An alert and competent board of education, 
10, An active parent-teacher association organization, 

"It is essential for a good secondary school to have a carefully 
formulated educational philosophy," Mr, Mees declared, "The school' 
should be free to determine this philosophy for itself to the extent that 
it promotes the principles and spirit of American democracy, 

"Pupils should be given an opportunity to learn by doing and sharing 
with each other. Democracy should be practiced in the class room for it 
is more than a form of government, It is primarily a mode of associated 
living. Therefore, the philosophy of the school should be based on the 
democratic way of life." 

Today 1 s modern curriculum should include such courses as speech, 
art, industrial education, homemaking, agriculture, typing, shorthand, 
bookkeeping, salesmanship, music appreciation, as well as such subjects 
as English, foreign language, science, social science and mathematics, 
he said, 

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"There can be no rigid dividing line, educationally, between the * 



usual classroom activities and those activities sometimes called 
"extra-curricular activities" which commonly permit more freedom and 
are more largely initiated and directed by the pupils themselves, 1 ' he 
asserted. 

Another important part of r-he good high school which has been 
stressed in recent years is guidance, he pointed out. 

"Guidance should be thought of as an organized service designed to 
give systematic aid to pupils in making ad just merits to various types of 
problems which they must meet- -educational, vocational, health, moral, 
social, civic and personal. 

"It should endeavor to help the pupil to know himself as an 
individual and as a member of society; to enable him to correct certain 
of his shortcomings that interfere with his progress-; and to know about 
vocations and professions so that he may intelligently choose and prepare 
for a life career." 

In conclusion, Mr. Mees declared that ".communities too little 
appreciate that the school is their greatest cooperative enterprise and 
that it is permanently affects the welfare of its boys and girls," 

"This requires that the supporting public be informed regarding the 
policies, programs, objectives, activities and plans for the future of 
the school, and that the support be assured for the school's undertaking. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3«O0~42 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111,, March -Southern Illinois University's 
championship team placed two men on the 194$ Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference All-Star team, 

Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, the Maroon's team captain and "Most- 
Valuable" player, was chosen captain of the All-Conference team at the 
center position, and Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, Southern's dangerous 
scorer and ace defensive man was picked at one guard position^ 

For Stinson, the selection was his third consecutive, giving him th< 
distinction of having been All-Conference ever}' year he played. Eadie 's 
choice was his first, and came in his first year with the Maroons. 

Bob Colborn of Flora, Southern's leading scorer, was nominated on th< 
second team, as was Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, at forward and _uard, 
respectively. Joe Hughes of West Frankfort received honorable mention ir 
the selections which were made by the five I.I.a.C. coaches. 

The complete Ail-Star squad follows: 



First Team: 
Froelich, Northern 
Glover, Eastern 
Stinson, Southern (C) 
McClure, Western 
Eadie, Southern 



Position 
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Second Team 
Colborn, Southern 
Lockhart, Normal (C) 
Miksi s , Western 
Hudson, Eastern 
Shoaff, Southern 



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Honorable Mention: Williams, DeKalb; Hughes, Southern; Will, 
Western; Olson, Eastern, 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. I iMIHHHIHIIIHillllWIIIIIIIIMlliIlllllllllllillllllillllll 



3-31-48 

Carbondale, 111., April 1 - A three-day meeting of health educators 
opened today at the Motel Auto Court at Marion. 

Today major consideration will be given -to an Evaluation of 
Southern Illinois University's physiology and health education departmen 
faculty and its health and safety committee confer with H. 3. Masters, 
educational director of the Kellogg Foundation, and representatives 
of the State Office of Public Instruction. 

Ray Duncan, state director of health and physical education, and 
Miss Hazel O'Neal, state health consultant, will be present. 

On Friday this group will visit some of the schools in Southern 
Illinois to inspect their health programs. 

On Saturday the State Health Education Planning Committee, composed 
of representatives of the six state-supported higher educational 
institutions, the' State Office of Public Instruction, the State 
Department of Health and the State Department of Registration and 
Education, will convene. 

One of the purposes of the Saturday session is to set up objectives 
of the state's school and community health education program, according 
to Ralph H. Boatman, health coordinator at Southern. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-31-46 

Carbondale, 111., March - More than 400 soloists and ensembles 
will be entered in the District Music Contest of the Illinois High 
School Association on April 3 here on the Southern Illinois University 
campus, according to John Mees, University High School principal. 

The ensembles have a personnel of from three to eight members. 

The contest will be conducted in the following places: the 
Gymnasium, the Little Theatre, and room 203 in the Science Building; 
the Shryock Auditorium stage; and two rooms, A101 and A30$ in the 
Allyn Building. 

The followin-" schools are entering contestants in the District 
meet ; Anna- Jonesboro, Ashley, Attucks of Carbondale, Benton, Cairo, 
Sumner of Cairo, University High School of Carbondale, Carbondale 
Community, Carrier Mills, Cave-in-Rock, Christopher, Dongola, Douglas 
of Mounds, DuQuoin, Gorham, Karrisburg, Herrin, Hurst -Bush , Marion, 
McLeansboro, Mound City, Mt . Vernon, Murphysboro, Nashville, Okawville, 
Pinckneyville , Ridgeway, Royalton, Sesser, Thompsonville , Valier, West 
Frankfort, and Zeigler. 

Carbondale, 111., March - Alex Reed, assistant professor of 
vocational agriculture in University High School at Southern Illinois 
University here, will attend the meeting of the Illinois Vocational 
Association in Chicago April 1-3. Other Southern Illinois vocational 
agriculture instructors who will attend include Harold Homann of 
DuQuoin, George Cochrum of Sesser and Russell Weser of Benton, Mr. 
Reed said. 












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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^nHBHHnmHHManHHHl 



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Carbondale, 111., April - A large delegation from Southern 
Illinois University is attending professional meetings in Chicago 
this week. 

Attending the Illinois Vocational Association meeting April 1-3 
are: R. W. English, and Richard Kohler of the industrial education 
department; Miss Viola DuFrain, associate professor of business 
administration; Mrs. Bonnie Lockwood, instructor in commerce in 
University High School; Miss Pauline DeHass, associate professor of 
home economics; and Alex Reed, instructor in vocationalagriculture 
in University High School. 

Attending the Illinois conference of the American Association of 
University of Professors April 2 are Dr. W. C. McDaniel, associate 
professor of mathematics; Dr. J. Gary Davis, associate professor of 
foreign language, and Mr. English. Dr. McDaniel is secretary- 
treasurer of the University chapter of AAUP and Dr. Davis is vice 
president. 

The Central State Speech Association April 2 and 3 is drawing 
Dr. P. M. Larson, Dr. Archibald McLeod, C. W. Garbutt, Mrs. Eleanor 
Young and Mrs. Jeannette Neckers, faculty members of the Southern 
speech department. 






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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-1-43 

Carbondale, 111., April - Personality development will be the 
topic for seminar discussion at the quarterly Child Guidance Clinic 
scheduled for April 7 and B at Southern Illinois University, according 
to Dr. W. A. Thalman, clinic director. 

Dr. Harry Segenreich, psychiatrist, and Miss Mary Sullivan, 
psychiatric social worker, from the Illinois Institute for Juvenile 
Research will be consultants. 

Dr. Segenreich will direct a seminar on "Some Factors in 
Personality Development" at 3 p. m. on Wednesday, April 7, while Miss 
Sullivan will direct discussion at the Thursday seminar at 3 P» m. 

Individual children admitted to the clinic will be examined by 
members of the clinic's professional staff. Persons interested in 
having other children studied should contact Dr. Thalman and arrange 
for dates. 

All staffings and seminars will be open to University students 
and faculty and will be held in Room 101, Main Building. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - Dr. Lowell Tucker, acting chairman of 
the agriculture department at Southern Illinois University, and Alex 
Reed, agriculture instructor in University high school, recently 
visited the Western Kentucky Experimental sub-station near Princeton, 
Ky., to study phases of that program which may be of value in 
developing the Southern program. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. CaHHnHBKaHH9BUanHHUHOHBnHI 



Attention: Sports Editors k-l-k& 

Carbondale, 111., April - Karlan C. Hodges, assistant basketball 
and football coach at Southern Illinois University, has signed a three- 
year contract as head coach of basketball at Iiurray(Ky. ) State College. 

Formerly an outstanding coach in high school at West Frankfort 
and Carrier Mills, Hodges joined the Maroon staff in September of 1947. 
He will continue his work of teaching physical education here until the 
close of the spring term in June when he will move to Murray. 

The affable, popular Hodges will be coaching in one of the best 
basketball schools in the Middle West, a school which through the years 
has maintained an excellent record. He replaces John Miller who 
resigned early in the past season after a bad start. 

This will be the third college at which Holdges has coached. In 
addition to Southern, he also has experience at Missouri (Rollo) School 
of Mines, when he won the Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
track championship in 1943 . 

Southern Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin stated that he was 
sorry to lose Hodges, who had been very satisfactory, but that he 
realized the move is to Hodges' advantage. 



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University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. iEBfiBBMaHHHBBHHBSHmHMHHBHi 



For Saturday release: 4-2-48 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111*, April 3 - Southern Illinois University's 
untried baseball Maroons open their season at Jonesboro, Arkansas, 
today when they face the host Arkansas State College Indians at 2:00 p*m 

Maroon Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will not know who all his starters 
will be until shortly before game time. The primary reason for Martin's 
uncertainty is the wet weather which had dampened Southern spirits and 
practice grounds for a week.. 

Martin and his charges tre well aware that they are not in good 
shape for the game, having had only three warm days of outside practice 
this spring, and the practice on those days was impeded by dampness. 

Marion Moake of Marion will probably draw the starting mound 

assignment and Raymond Kuykendall of Steelville will do the receiving, 

■ 

The infield appears to be well defined with Clyde ''Lou" Leilich of New 
Athens at first, Bill Bleyer of Carterville at second, Charlie "Bull" 
Durham of West Frankfort at short, and freshman Kenny Longman of Herrin 
at the hot-corner. 

But in the outfield, Martin will wait until the last moment, his 
starters depending upon whether Arkansas choses a left or righthander 
for the starting assignment. 

Completing the 27-man traveling squad are: catchers, Milton 
Wisebecker of Mt . Vernon and Richard Jones of Gillespie; first base, 
Don Glover of Mt . Vernon; second btse* Bill Elder of Eldorado; third 
base, Jesse Payne of Carbondale. 

Outfield: Pete Milosevich, Zeigler; George Bauer, Zei?ler; Bob 
Goalby, Belleville; James Becker, Evansville; Jim Lovin, Benton; Dick 
Seelman, Flora; Ed Kerr, Carbondale; and Bill Casper, Cobden. 

Pitchers: Byron Hargis, Ellis Grove; Bernard Heiligenstein, 
Freeburg; Leon Sitter, Cobden; Harry ''Bud" Grater, Carbondale; Bill 
Kasich, Benld. 






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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. IIIIIIIWIIIIIIII — ■■HIIIMI li—WI— nUTTlTlllTin 



Carbondale, 111., April - Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, a 
graduate student at Southern Illinois University, has been awarded a 
^700 scholarship to the University of Illinois for 194^-49 • 

Miss Sullivan has been an honor student at Southern. As an 
undergraduate, she was enrolled in the College of Education, but her 
Graduate School work has been largely in the government department. 
She has a 5.0 point — straight A—record in the government department, 
and an overall grade point average of 4.8. 

Former editor of The Egyptian , stuaent newspaper, she is a member 
of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity; Sphinx Club, student 
honorary society; Mu Tau Pi, journalism fraternity, of which she was 
president last year; and the Newman Club, Catholic student organization. 

She was chosen for inclusion in Who ' s Wh o Among Students in 
American Colleges and Universities last year. 

This year she has been employed as part-time secretary in the 
government department. 

A graduate scholarship to the University of Illinois is awarded 
each year to a top-ranking student from each of the other state higher 
educational institutions, 

Carbondale, 111., April -The Duggan Dancers from Texas State 
College for Women will pay a return visit to Southern Illinois 
University here April 16, according to Dr, Dorothy Davies,. associate 
professor of physical education for women. 

This dance group, known throughout the country for their 
professional performances, presented a dance concert here two years ago 
and proved t o be one of the most popular numbers on the University's 
entertainment calendar. 

The dance concert will be presented in Shryock Auditorium at 
8 p. m. and will be open to the public 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. SSraHUHHanHBmnHHBHHEBHOBaniHHnMMHM,' 



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Attention: Sports Editors 4-6-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., April - About sixty Southern Illinois 
University varsity athletes will see action Saturday, April 10, as 
the Maroons entertain four sport teams from two schools, Western 
Illinois State College and Illinois State Normal University. 

Baseball Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's charges will try to enter 
the win column against the highly touted Redbirds of Normal. Western 
will invade Carbondale with track, golf, and tennis teams. 

The Maroons lost their only baseball game, a 3-2 decision at 
Arkansas State last Saturday. Even in losing, Southern looked good, 
surprisingly good in view of the very limited amount of practice they 
have had. 

Four pitchers, Marion Moake of Marion, Bernard Heiligenstein of 
Freeburg, Leon Sitter of Cobden, and 3yron Hargis of Chester, hurled 
two rounds each, and each turned in an able job. 

Leland P. u Doc" Lingle will lead his thin-clads against the 
Western Leathernecks to begin what is hoped will be a very successful 
season. Lingle has a solid crew of lettermen back in the fold from 1947 

Bill Freeburg' s tennis team is of unknown quality. Every netster 
is a newcomer, and how well they will bear up under competition is a 
matter of conjecture. 

Lynn Holder, Maroon cage coach, is blessed with four returning 
lettermen, but he is troubled by having no regular place to play. 
Jackson Country Club, where the Maroons played in 1947, is undergoing 
repairs, and is unavailable for use. 

Arrangements have been made for golf meets to be played at the 
DuQuoin Country Club. 









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LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. a^BraBBHHHBraSHDBBBHnBaHBHH 

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Carbondale, 111., April - Mrs. Bonaro Wilkinson Overstreet, 
distinguished poet, phychologist , and author, will give a series of 
lectures to faculty, student and women's clubs at Southern Illinois 
University April 10, 11, and 12, according to P. Merville Larson, 
chairman of the University lectures and entertainment committee. 

She will be occompanied by her husband, Harry Allen Overstreet, 
also a widely noted lecturer and counselor. Both Dr. and Mrs. Overstree" 
will be presented at a special assembly program Monday morning at 
10 a. m. in Shryock Auditorium. The public is invited, 

"Mrs. Overstreet is peculiarly fitted to bring to audiences a new 
perspective on life and a new practical courage for daily living," 
Dr. Larson said. 

Educated in California, she first taught Enslish in Kern Countv 
Junior College. Recently she has been distinguished for her work in 
adult education at the School of Related Arts and Sciences in Mew York, 
at Claremont and Hills Colleges, and as co-director with Mr. Overstreet 
of the Leadership School at Town Hall, New York. 

Her weekly page in PM, entitled ''American Reasons and Motes for 
Notes for Nov/," has won national acclaim. Other literary successes are 
two psychological volumes A Search for a Self and Courage For C risis . 
"The Poetic Way of Release," and ''Footsteps on the Earth" are among her 
best known poetic works. Harper's will soon publish "Quality People 
For A Free Society." 

Carbondale, 111., April -Eleven Southern Illinois University 
students have been initiated into Delta Rho, honorary mathematics 
fraternity. 

The new initiates include: Donald Bits of Cairo, James Gibson of 

Harrisburg, Thomas Kerr of Johnston City, Dale Kittle of Wayne City, 

James C. Martin of Norris City, Emmett Moll of Vergennes, Raymond Peters 

of Balcom, Joseph Rezetka of Benton, Louis Rowell of Anson, Texas, 

William Staudacher of Marion, and H.E. Suits of Elizabethtown. 

Bill Hoyle of Alto Pass, a graduate student, was spesker for the 
Founders Day banquet at which the new members were initiated. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-7-43 

Carbonciale, 111., April - An exhibit of paintings of Mexican 
subjects by a Canadian flier will be shown at Southern Illinois Universi 
April 3-30, Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the art department, has 
announced . 

The paintings of W. J. 3. Newcombe, loaned from the State Museum 
at Springfield, will be shown in the Little Gallery on the second floor 
of the Main Building. The exhibit is open to the public. 

The young Canadian painter, who served, in the Royal Canadian Air 
Force, went to Mexico after the war. Many of his paintings were done at 
the art colony at San Moguel de Allende . 

"Life and Death," symbolizing the life and growth of plants in 
contrast to old buildings in a street of ruins, is regarded as Newcombe' 
strongest work, according to Mr. Watkins. 

Other pictures in the exhibit are "Mexican Country Scene/' "Hacien 
Ruins," "Ghosts of San Miguel Canyon," and "Siesta.'' 

"Newcombe ' s use of figures is original in dramatic composition," 
Mr. Watkins pointed out. "The spectator often feels that he is engaging 
in the activity of the scene. This is particularly true in the picture 
'3eiz,' or 'Baseball,' where the spectator becomes a player before the 
crows." 

The Newcombe exhibit is being circulated by the State Museum and 
is now completing a circuit of Illinois colleges and universities. 

m 






Carbondale, 111., April -High-ranking high school seniors from 
Southern Illinois high schools will be guests of Southern Illinois 
University April 23-24 for the second annual "Hospitality Week-End," 
according to Miss Lorena Drummond, director of the Information Service 
and chairman of the arrangements committee. 

The high school students will visit classes, confer with deans and 
department chairmen, meet outstanding faculty and student leaders, and 
engage in typical University social activities. They will be housed in 
University student residences and will take their meals at the Uniyersit 
Cafeteria. 



. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-3-43 

Carbondale, 111., April -The Southern Illinois Editorial 
Association will hold its spring meeting here at Southern Illinois 
University and at Giant City State Fark, April 16-17, according to 
Royce Bridges of Vienna, president. 

Guest speaker for the session will be E. W. Schergens, editor of 
the Tell City, Ind., N ews , who has won a number of awards in the 
Indiana Press Association. 

Mr. Schergens will speak at the opening session Friday afternoon 
in the Little Theatre on the University campus. His subject will be 
"Journalism, Payrolls and Profits." 

Mu Tau Pi, journalism fraternity at the University, will serve 
coffee during the intermission in the afternoon program, and e group of 
University students will present entertainment at the dinner session 
at Giant City Friday evening. 



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Carbondale, 111., April -When Mrs. Bonaro Overstreet, noted 
poet, psychologist and counselor visits Southern Illinois University 
this week-end, the University will share her services with townspeople. 

On Saturday evening at 7:30 p. m. , she will meet informally with 
students and faculty who are interested in campus problems. On 
Sunday afternoon at 3 p. m. she will speak to the Student Wives Group 
on "New Image of the Farent," a program to which members of Carbondale 
parent-teacher groups and parents of Allyn Training School children 
are invited. 

On Monday morning, a special assembly of students and faculty 
will be held to hear Mrs. Overstreet discuss ,f How to Make the Most of 
Ourselves." The public is also invited to attend this program. At 
2:30 Monday afternoon she will speak before the Carbondale Women's Club, 

Mrs. Overstreet will be accompanied by her husband, Dr. Harry 
Overstreet, who is also a distinguished lecturer and counselor. 



### 



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" 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



4-£-4£ 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., April -With a week of good track weather 
behind them, the Southern Illinois University track team will open its 
season Saturday at 1:30 in McAndrew Stadium against the Leathernecks of 
Western Illinois State College, 

No predication can be made upon the outcome of the meet, since it is 
the first for both teams. 

However, Leland P, "Doc" Lingle T s men should be able to make a stron 
bid for victory. In trials, their times and distances have been very 
satisfactory considering the early stage of the season. 

Men who have been impressive in workouts are: Track events; sprints 
Joe Budde of Belleville and William Chapman of Raymond, both freshmen; 
440 and 380, Captain George Beltz of Marion; mile, Joe McLafferty of 
Carbondale; two mile, Buddy Miller of Carbondale; high hurdles, Gene 
McFarland of Johnston City and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort; low hurdles, 
Howard Jones of Benton. 

Field events: pole vault, Bob Neighbors of Belleville and Norris 
Garner of Johnston City; high jump, Harold Hartley of Ashley and Bill 
Winning of Herrin; broad jump, Adrian Stonecipher of Salem; shot put, 
Charlie Mathieu of Eldorado, Jim Cole of Norris City, and Truman Hill of 
Benton; discus, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Cole, and Hill; and javelin, 
Cole and Willis Anderson of Burkburnett, Texas, 









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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 4-3-48 

Carbondale, 111., April - An untried tennis team will be 
representing Southern Illinois University here Saturday when the 
Maroons face Western Illinois State College at 1:30 p. m. on the 
Southern courts springs tennis opener » 

Coach Bill Freeburg will miss the stars of last year's team, all 
of whom graduated. Entirely new faces will swing Southern's rackets, 
and the emphasis is on youth. 

Jack Mawdsley of Granite City, a sophomore, will take the number 
one singles spot and will team with number two man Bill V/illiams of 
Galatia in forming the first doubles team. 

Dick Vorwald, also of Granite City and a sophomore, is in the 
number three singles position, and Bob Armstrong of Carbondale will 
play number four. 

Freeburg has not yet named his second doubles team, but he has 
indicated that it will be chosen from three men, Vorwald, Armstrong, 
and Bob Harmon of Lincoln* 

Other men on the tennis squad rated high are Bill Price of 
Texico, Nick Kostoff and James Malottki of Granite City. 

Q»D. Miskell of Carbondale recently reported to the net team, 
and will probably strengthen the team. At the present time, however, 
he is out of condition and Freeburg expects several weeks to lapse 
before he can make his presence felt. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. OflMgMMMHHBHBiMMBMBHMBBBMSI 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., April -Illinois State Normal University will 
provide the opposition Saturday afternoon when Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin'* 
Southern Illinois University Maroons open their home baseball schedule. 

The game, which will start at 2:00 p.m., will be played at 
Riverside Park in Murphysboro. The Maroons' new field on West Chautauqua 
has not yet been completed, and although the Martinmen practice there, it 
is not yet fit for a game. 

Normal will bring one of their strongest teams in history. Boasting 
21 lettermen, and a host of excellent newcomers, the Redbirds are heavily 
favored to win the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title. 

Already this season Normal has notched victories over Vu T ashington 
University and the University of Wisconsin. 

Southpaw Marion Moake of Marion will open on the hill for the 
Maroons, and freshman Raymond Kuykendall of Steeleville will be behind 
the plate. 

Second baseman Bill Bleyer of Carterville will be Martin's only 
veteran starter. Bleyer was one of the team's leading hitters in 1947. 

Other men in the infield are Clyde "Lou" Leilich of New Athens, firs 

base j Jesse Payne of Carbondale, shortstop; and Kenny Longman, the Herrin 

freshman, at third base. 

Hustling Bob Johnson of DuQuoin, a regular halfback on the I.I.A.C. 
football champions, has drawn the starting assignment in center field. 

Other outfielders are Bob Goalby of Belleville, and Bill Kasich of 
Benld, a pitcher who has been converted to an outfielder because of his 
powerful hitting. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-9-43 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111,, April - Ten men will receive varsity 
basketball letters for the 1947-43 season at Southern Illinois 
University , 

Men to receive the awards were nominated by basketball Coach 
Lynn G t , Holder, and were approved by the faculty athletic committee 
undei '".he chairmanship of Dr, William heal Phelps. 

The following men will receive letters: Bob Colborn of Flora, 
Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Jack Eadie 
of West Frankfort, Oliver Shoaff of i<it.. Carmel, Paul Beaty of 
Centralia, Galen Davis of DuQuoin, Jack Long of Flora, and Charles 
and John Goss of Marion. 



H Ji 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. h^^h^h^h^^^^h 



4-9-43 

Carbondale, 111., April -Students at Southern Illinois 
University are getting set to hold their second annual Spring Carniva" 
and to make the affair an event to rival the school's fall Homecoming 
celebration . 

The one-day program of last year is this year being expanded to 
a three-day occasion, embracing a parade, a dramatic production by the 
Little Theatre, selection of a "Miss Southern 1 ' from the University's 
763 co-eds, an old-time vaudeville show, a masquerade ball, and perhaps 
a street dance. 

Robert Williams of Carmi has been elected student chairman for 
Spring Carnival, while Dr. Dorothy Davies and Leland P. "Doc" Lingle, 
co-chairmen of the student life committee, will serve as general facult; 
sponsors. 

Alumni will be invited to join in the Spring Carnival activities, 

Williams said. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -Pre-forestry students at Southern 
Illinois University will have the opportunity to find out more about 
the profession they are choosin.T when Eugene Van Arsdale, 3.947 
forestry graduate of Purdue University, visits the Southern campus 
April 13, according to* William M. Marberry, assistant professor of 
botany. 

Van Arsdale will speak on "The Forestry Profession" at 7*. 30 p. m. 
Tuesday in Science Building 103 . 



Carbondale, 111., April -An original musical composition by a 
mathematics professor at Southern Illinois University will be played by 

the Southern concert band at its spring concert Tuesday evening, April 

13, at S p, in. in Shryock Auditorium. 

"Lullaby in Blue," by Dr. Louis Rodabaugh, associate professor of 
mathematics, with concert band arrangement by Herold C. Hires, the 
Southern band's conductor, will be performed. 

The concert, open to the public without charge, will embrace both 
classical and semi-popular selections, including many famed merching 
band compositions. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Saturday 4-9-48 

Carbondale , 111., April 10 - District music contests for bends, 

orchestras and choruses are being held today on the campus of Southern 

Illinois University with University High School as host . 

Competing fre bands from Anna- Jonesboro , Benton, Carbondale 

Community High School, Sumner High School of Cairo, Dongola, Harrisburg, 

Marion, Murphysboro, McLeans joro , Nashville, Mt . Vernon, Okawville, and 

Sesser; an orchestra from Mt . Vernon; and choruses from &nna~ Jonesboro, 

Ashley, Benton, Community, Attucks and University high schools of 

Carbondale, Harrisburg, Marion, Sesser, '."est Frankfort, Mt . Vernon 

and Thompsonville . 

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Carbondale, 111., npril -Final enrollment for the spring term 
at Southern Illinois University has reached 2,557, compered to 2,477 
for the spring term a year ago, according to the Registrar 1 s Office. 

Men students continue to out-number women by well over two to one, 
there being 1,794 men enrolled to 763 women, i. year ago there were 
1,709 men to 765 women in school. 

Veterans, however, have declined from 1,409 in the spring term a 
year ago to 1,2& V 9 this term. Of the current term veterans, ten are 
women. 

The College of Education continues to be the largest of the 
University's branches, counting 1,29$ students this term. The College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences has attracted 596 students, the College 
of Vocations and Professions 545, and the Graduate School 11$, A year 
ago only 67 students were enrolled in the Graduate School. 

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From the Information Serivce, Southern Illinois University 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-12-4B 

Carbondale, 111., April -The homemaker T s "margin of fear.' 7 
is the cause of many broken homes, said Mrs. Bonaro Overstreet, noted 
poet, psychologist, and author, in a lecture before Southern Illinois 
University faculty and students this morning. 

Mrs. Overstreet explained that every person has his circle of 
responsibility where he is expected to perform and perform well, and his 
circle of actual achievment. Often the circle of actual achievment is 
smaller than the circle of responsiblity causing emotional stress upon 
the part of- the individual. This margin of difference is called the 
margin of fear. In many homes women never really learn the job of 

homemaking and become defensive of their position. The fear margin makes 

■ 

:hem afraid of being caught off guard., hence conflict results In the 
Lome which too often leads to a break in the home. 

The fundamental needs of each individual are (a) the need -of belong! 
'b) the need for individual significance, and (c) the sense of being 
:ompetent, she pointed out. "If these fundamental needs are not somehow 
satisfied, we will be all out of kilter/' she said, w and can no longer 
>e health within ourself . 

"The sense of being wanted is the most basic. Without it the person 
becomes overly aggressive or prejudiced because he can't relax. The 
>erson who tries to , push other people around doesn't honestly feel wanted 
md cherished. His aggression is a sign of weakness and lack of feeling 
of belonging." 

The second need--that of individual—significance is a. compulsion to 
rant to be equal with others in relationships ana causes, the speaker 
said. "Ue must decide what kind of person we are going to be on our own 
lower," she declared. "If we let ourselves become simply users of the 
ready made, we are using up some portion of our uniqueness. Some people 
lie awake nights trying to make us want things we don't want. We must 
be something besides good consumers." 

Unless we make some choices in knowledge and beliefs, we are allowi. 
some of our individual equipment go to waste in the making of a unique 
self, Mrs. Overstreet cautioned. 

(More) 



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Last in Mrs. Overstreet ' s listing of the basic needs is the- sense 
of being competent, "the know how." For a sense of inner security, we 
must feel that we can perform some task well. 

"The pattern of need is to have skill and competence enough to have 
no fear," she added. "The person who has no sense of belonging is 
dangerous to others. The person who has no individuality adds nothing t 
the group. The person with no competence is of no value to the group. 

"The psychologist says the person creates the situation in which he 
finds himself. He makes chaos and then gives justification for making 
more chaos." 

"Psychology and its companion, the life sciences, are saying that 
our chance to be effective, our chance to be happy, and our chance to gel 
along with others depends on what we think about our self." 

According to Mrs. Overstreet, Webster's dictionary contains 1,200 
words combined with "self" which might be said, to give man's moral and 
mental endeavor to find out what he is. Description of an individual's 
physical appearance tells us little about whether he is a desirable 
person. It is only when we apply "self" to the adjectives that we get 
an insight into character. "Self-righteous," "self-centered," and "self 
satisfied" are basic comments which lead us to immediate decisions as to 
whether or not that individual is one which we desirel to have around, 
she pointed out. 

"Self" expressions show that an individual is tied up with the 
world," she explained. "Being self-conscious or 'all elbow' in front 
of a crowd shows that you don't feel the whole situation, but part of it; 
and therefore your tie with the world is not as effective as it should 
be. The same is true with self-pity. If everyone else gets a square 
deal and you don't then your self relationships are not effective." 

The great news of our century is the underwriting of our old 
Spiritual values by psychology and the social sciences. The 
psychiatrist's spiritual way to mental health lies in the human fellowsh: 
that has been pointed out to us through the centuries by our spiritual 
see-ers, she concluded, 

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_ 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Loren a Drumnond , Ed ito r 



4-12-48 

Carbondale, 111., April -First place in the sectional speaking 
contest for the Future Farmers of America, held here at Southern Illinoi 
University recently,, went to Sam Vancil of Du^uoin, Wno spoke on 
"Agriculture as a Career. 51 

Second place winner was Howard Tweedy of Anna-Jonesboro, whose 
subject was "Sowing Our Soil," while Donald Porter of Eldorado, 
speaking on ''Building Blocks of the F.F.A.," won third place. 

Other contestants were Albert Helvey of Pinckneyville, Charles 
Mason of Vienna and Charles Hankins of Galatia. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -The Little Theatre at Southern Illinois 
University will step up its schedule to present itwo spring plays this 
year, the first early in May, the second in connection with the Spring 
Carnival May 20-23, according to Dr. Archibald McLeod, director. 

The first production will be "Death Takes a Holiday" by Alberta 
Cassela, the second "Mr. Pim Passes By" by A. A. Milne. 

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Carbondale, Ill v , April -Southern Illinois University is t Trent] 
distributing to high schools of this area copies of the brochure, 
"Recreational Possibilities of Southern Illinois," the first of a series 
of booklets to be issued containing results of a survey of Southern 
Illinois resources, according to Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean o'f the 
University's College of Vocations and Professions. 

The survey is being conducted b3< r the University of Illinois,, 
Southern Illinois University, and three State agencies--the State 
Geological Survey, the State Natural History Survey, and the State 
I Water Survey. , 

The brochures, of which "Recreational Possibilities" is the first, 
are condensations of chapters which later will anpear in a book. 

Dean Rehn is chairman of Southern's committee to work with the 
general survey committee. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-12-43 

Carbondale, 111., April -A collegiate modern dance group that 
has attained professional finish will perform at Southern Illinois 
University here Friday evening, April 16, when the Duggan Dancers from 
Texas State College for Women present their second concert here in two 
years. 

Sponsored by the women's physical education department, the dance 
concert will be open to the public. It is scheduled for 3 p.m. in 
Shryock Auditorium. 

The dance group was started at TSCW 12 years ago by Dr. Anne Schley 
Duggan, professor and director of the TSCW department of health, physical 
education and recreation. This group has become renowned throughout the 
Southwest, and in 1946 appeared at the national meeting of the American 
Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation in St. Louis, 
and will participate in the association's pre-convention dance conference 
this year. 

Dance concerts and demonstrations have been given by the group at 
Mississippi State Teachers College, Memphis (Tenn. ) State College, and 
here at Southern. 

Dr. Duggan, director of the group, is an outstanding authority 
in dance education and is the author of numerous books and articles on 
the dance in education. For .four summers she has taught at the Universit 
of the Dance, Jacob's Pillow, Lee, Mass., which in 1946 was attended by 
many men studying under the G.I. Bill of Rights. 

At its concert here, the Duggan Dance Group will present "Spring 
; Suite," "Megro Spiritual Suite," "Suite of Dance Forms," and "Heritage of 
the Southwest." Choreography will range from the lyric ballet type of 
[performance to the dramatic interpretation of the Indians and the 
[informal posturing of the cowboy. 

The members of the dance group include: Colleen Bennett, Beth Elaii 

Dugan, Nancy Harvey, Kitty -Kelley, Peggy Lawler, Marcia Manson, Helen 

I Troy Martin, Regina Mitchell, Marion Nicoll, Hugh Jane Richardson, 
[ Claire Jean Williams and Jeannette Schlottman. Miss Schlottman has been 
: Dr. Duggan's assistant since 1939. Mary Campbell is accompanist and 
i composer of the music for many of the dance compositions. Betsy 
j, Cunningham, dramatic soprano, sings the accompaniment for several of 
the numbers, as well as a solo group of songs. 



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From the Southern* Illinois University Information Scrvici 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 4-12-4$ Si 

Carbondale, 111., April - Southern Illinois University's trackj 
tennis, and golf teams are steadying themselves this week to resist an 
invasion by Cape Girardeau on Wednesday, April 14. The tennis meet 
will begin at 1:00 p.m. on the Southern courts, the golf meet at 1:00 
p.m. at the DuQuoin Country Club, and the track meet at 3:00 p.m. in 
Mc Andrew Stadium. 

Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle's track team opened its season in 
good form last Saturday by swamping Weste.ro Illinois State College 
8$ 2/3 to 42 l/3, but Bill Freeburg' s charges on the tennis courts 
fared poorly in losing six straight matches to their Leatherneck 
opponents . 

Paced by the record breaking performance of Quentin Stinson of 
Eldorado in the discus, the Maroons took 10 firsts and tied for 
another. The Linglemen swept three events, the mile, two mile, and 
pole vault . 

Stinson threw the discus 145' 11 J" to break the Southern record 
which he established last year. This mark is better than the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference distance, and Stinson is undoubtedly 
pointing toward establishing an new 1. I. A. C. record. 

Against Cape, the Maroons are anticipating a difficult, interestin 
track meet. Southern's promising freshman railer, Joe McLafferty of 
Carbondale, will meet his first serious competitor in Cape's Course, 
who is one of the best 'nailers in this section of the country. 
McLafferty won easily last Saturday in 4, 50s. 

Tennis Coach Freeburg attributed the Maroon's overwhelming loss 
to Western partly to lack of experience. It was the first competition 
for any of his team, and they did not play up to par. 

' m 

Glenn "Abe" Martin's baseball team, which will be idle until 
Friday, April 16, when Western comes to Carbondale for a two-game, two- 
day series, took highly favore'd Normal's measure 4 to 3 in a thriller « 

The Maroons had a number of fielding lapses, but the brilliant 
clutch pitching of Marion Moake of Marion, who went the conn ] ete'routc , 
saved the victory, Moake scattered s even hits and stranded' 10 
Redbirds on base. 

The star of the game, however, was Rzadski, Normal pitcher, who 
allowed only three hits. After the Maroons had made four" runs in the 
first two innings with the aid of four Normal errors, Rzadski retired 
18 of the next 19 men in order^ 

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/ 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Garbondale, 111., April 



4-14- 4$ 
-A large delegation of faculty and 



■students will go from Southern Illinois Universi ty to the national 
meeting of the American Association of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation in Kansas City, Mo., April 21-23. 

The entire staff of the women* s physical education department and 
a large group of co-eds who .are majors in physical education v» ; ill go by 
chartered bus. The faculty members are Dr. Dorothy Davies, associate 
professor and acting department chairman, Mrs. Dorothy Muzzey, Kiss Jean 
Stehr and Hiss Theresa Ivanuck, 

In addition, three faculty members from the department of physiology 
and health education--Miss Frances Phillips, Miss Florence Denny and 
Ralph Boatman--will also attend, the convention, 

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Carbondale, 111., April -For the second annual year, the 
Egyptian Fire Fighters Association will come to Southern Illinois 
University April 20-23 for a short course in fire-fighting and pre- 
•prevention methods, according to Dr. Neal Phelps, acting director of the 
University physical plant. 

Between 75 and 100 members of the association are expected to 
attend. Sessions of lectures and demonstrations will be held from 1 
to 5 p.m. daily, and night classes may be scheduled, Dr. Phelps added. 



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From the Southern Illinois University information Service 

Lorena Drummoncl , Editor 



4-14-43 
Carbondale, 111., April - The Madrigal Singers from Southern 
Illinois University will present a concert at the Metropolis High School 
Monday evening, April 19, at 7:30 p. m. 

These 14 voice students, who sing without instrumental accompanime 
present the ballads and other songs of the 1.6th and 17th century, and 
appear in colorful costumes of the Elizabethan era. The group is 
directed by Floyd V. Wakeland, associate professor of music, 

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Carbondale, 111., April -Two Southern Illinois University 
alumni groups will hold dinner meetings soon, with guest speakers from 
the campus here, according to Dr. Orville Alexander, director of 
alumni services. 

The Chicago alumni will hold its annual dinner April 2$ at 6:30 
p. m. at the Central YkCA, 19 S. LaSalle St. Dr. Ted Ragsdale, 
principal of the Allyn Training School at the University and a former 
officer of the Southern Alumni Association, will be the speaker. 

On May 14, the newly organized alumni club at Champaign will hold 
a dinner meeting at the Town Club at 7 P.. m. Prof. E. G. Lentz of the 
history department has been invited to speak. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - Miss Frances Phillips, instructor in 
physiology and health education at Southern Illinois University, has 
been appointed a member of a state-wide committee to develop a teaching 
unit for senior high schools on "Effective Living and Personality 
Development ." 

The committee is headed by Dr. C. 0. Jackson, School of Physical 
Education, University of Illinois. 

rn, 7? 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 4-14-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., April -Cold weather and wet grounds forced 
the postponement of Southern Illinois University's track, tennis, and 
golf meets scheduled for April 14 against Cape Girardeau at Carbondale. 

However, plenty of weekend activities remain on the docket for 
Southern athletes. 

The Maroon baseball team of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will play a 
two-game series Friday and Saturday against Western Illinois State 
College. These games, which will start at 3*00 p.m. on Friday and 2;00 
p.m. on Saturday respectively, will be played at Riverside Park in 
Murphysboro . 

Leland P. "Doc" Lingle's track charges are scheduled for their 
next meet Saturday, April 17, when they will play host to St. Louis 
University at 1:30 p.m. in McAndrew Stadium, In their first meet, the 
Linglemen defeated Western Illinois #8 2/3 to 42 i/3 . 

St. Louis University's tennis team will also appear Saturday, and 
are favored to defeat the inexperienced Maroon net-men. 

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Carbondale, 111., April -John F. Carmichael, sports editor of 
the Chicago Daily News and well-known after-dinner speaker, will appear 
on the Southern Illinois University campus at 2:00 p.m. when he will 
speak to Southern students and the general public. 

Although his subject has not been announced, it is expected that 
he will reminisce in the sports humor and pathos which have made him one 
of the outstanding sports-speakers in the nation. 

Admission to Carmichael' s talk, which has been scheduled for the 
Little Theatre of the Old Science Building, will be free, according t o 
Glenn "Abe" Martin, Maroon director of athletics. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Release Friday p.m. 4-15-4& 

Carbondale , 111., April - A University High School girl from 

Southern Illinois University is today and tomorrow competing with the 

best the state has to" offer in humorous reading, at the State Finals 

of the Illinois High School Association's speech contest in Champaign. 

Virda Sill of Carbondale has bee ten all comers in district and 

sectional meets and now enters the State Finals. 

She was accompanied by Mrs. Eleanor Young, faculty member in 

charge of U. High speech activities, who will judge the extemporaneous 

» 
speaking contest on Friday evening. 



Release Friday p.m. 

Carbondale, 111., April - The Southern Illinois Editorial 
issociation opened its spring meeting here this afternoon at Southern 
Illinois University. 

After a welcome from University President Chester F. Lay, the 
>rganization heard a discussion of Illinois Press Association affairs 
Tom Charles W, Mills, state president. 

Guest speaker for the meeting is E. W. Schergens, editor of the 
Tell City ( Ind . ) News , scheduled to speak at 2:30 p.m. on "Journalism, 
Payrolls and Profits." * 

Other Friday afternoon speakers are Howe V. Morgan of Sparta 
News -Plai nde ale r on '''Country Correspondents"; Curtis G. Small, Harrisbur 
Register , leading a roundtable' on "Newspaper Problems'''; Charles G. 
Feirich, Metropolis New s, leading a roundtable on the University's 
Information Service; and Fred S. Siebert , director of the University of 
Illinois School of Journalism, on the subject, "Siebert Sez." 

Election of officers will take place in the- late afternoon. 

The association will then go to Giant City State Park for dinner, 
to spend the night and hold its Saturday session, 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Director 



' 4-15-43 

Carbondale, 111., April - Approximately 20 per cent of the 
2,500 students enrolled at Southern Illinois University are commuting, 
some from neighboring communities but a substantial number from great 
distances, according to the annual report of Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing 
counselor, 

"Many students who drive in from adjacent towns do so because they 
prefer to live at home," Mrs. Pulliam pointed out, "but those who drive 
; long distances daily do so either because of the poor housing facilities 
in Carbondale or because they feel they can reduce living costs by 
living in their own homes." 

An analysis of the housing situation at Southern this year shows 
that approximately 37 per cent of the girls and 13 per cent of the boys 
live in organized houses—dormitory, fraternity or sorority, or organize 
rooming or boarding house. This group represents abput 20 per cent of 
the total. 

Another approximately 20 per cent of the student body lives in 
unorganized houses. Only five students live in trailers and only 33 
basement rooms and apartments are occupied by students. 

"The rooming situation for students appears a bit better than a 
year ago," Mrs. Fulliam reported, ''However, there is not e surplus of 
good rooms. 

"In the fall of 1946 when the boys were returning from service, 
25 students rented rooms in Murphysboro. This year no student rented 
a room in Murphysboro unless he preferred it to Carbondale. 

"No student was turned away this past year because no room could 
be found for him." 

Mrs. Pulliam attributed much of the relief in the housing situation 

to the fact that the University has provided 173 emergency apartments 

for veterans, both adjacent to the campus and at the Illinois Ordnance 

Plant. Another 27 apartments at the ordnance plant housing project are 
I 

Lin process of completion. 

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From the .Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-17-43 

Carbondale, 111., April 17 - Bryant Voris of Waterloo was elected 
president of the Southern Illinois editorial Association at its two- 
day spring meeting which opened at Southern Illinois University here 
Friday, 

Frank Ledbetter of Carterville was elected vice president, and 
Otha Lanier of Altamont secretary-treasurer. Voris succeeds Royce 
Bridges of Vienna as president. 

Directors elected included past presidents Brid-res, Joe Mueller of 
Ramsey, Howe Morgan of Sparta, Kenneth Mollman of Milistadt, and Lucien 
File of Chester. 

Guest speaker for the occasion was E. W. Schergens of the Tell Cit' 
(Ind.) News , who, spoke on "Journalism, Payrolls and Profits.'' 

For the development of a progressive, profitable weekly newspaper, 
Mr. Schergens advocated: (1) a strong local editorial column, geared 
to the interests of the community-- ''The people want to know and have a 
right to know what the editor thinks about important issues/' he said; 
(2) a good sports page; (3) good photographs; (4) active participation 
in communit}?- enterprises; (5) maintenance of sound subscription 
policies, occasionally offering reduced r::tes for long-term 
subscriptions . 

University President Chester F. La}?- welcomed the newspaper editors, 
and spoke briefly on a recent study of mass communications media 
conducted by the University of Chicago with the backing of the 
Encyclopedia Britannica. 

Charles V. Mills of Vandalia, president of the Illinois Press 
Association, conducted a brief session on IPA business, including a 
forecast of the May 2$-29 meeting at Peoria, legislation and other 
affairs. 

Services of country correspondents were analyzed by Mr. Morgan of 
Sparta, who reported the values his paper has received from entertainin 
its correspondents annually. 

Curtis G. Small of Harrisburg conducted a round table on "Newspape 
Problems," featuring a report by A.E. Strang, editor of the Bunker 
Hill News - Gazette , who recounted the experiences of getting his paper 

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off the press following the demolition of the town of Bunker Hill by 
the March tornado. 

He spoke of the progress that has been made in one month in 
restoring the town, but deplored the fact that funds are not available 
for reconstruction of civic centers such as the library, the city hal] , 
parks, etc. Several editors indicated an interest in conducting 
campaigns in their own communities for contributions to a Bunker Hill 
reconstruction fund, to be sent to the Allied Club Council. 

Charles C. Feirich of Metropolis led i roundtable on the services 
of the University Information Service. 

"Seibert Sez' T was the subject of a talk by Fred S. Seibert, direct 
of the School of Journalism, University of Illinois. 

Mr. Seibert commented on a variety of topics, including the I?A T s 
legislative program designed to recodigy the st£te T s publication laws; 
the current committee hearings in Washington on regulation of radio; 
the current United Nations commission session in Geneva on freedom of 
the press. 

He cautioned the editors that the radio hearings have a pertinent 
bearing on the newspapers, since radio is urging that radio should be 
as . free as the press in commenting on political and other public issues. 

"This may result in a well-intentioned but dangerous attempt to 
restrict the press in an effort to sort of equalise the two," he r'ointec 
out . 

Approximately 75 attended the afternoon session and attendance 
rose to about 100 at the dinner session at Giant City State Perk 
Friday night, where Southern Illinois University students presented 
an entertainment program. 

Many of the editors and their wives spent the night at the park 
and the Saturday morning session was held there. Tom Lee of Marissa lee 
a discussion of the association's 1948 summer outing, and outgoing 
secretary-treasurer Frank Ledbetter gave his annual report. 









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j From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
J Lorena Drummond, Director 



4-19-43 



Carbondale, 111., April -Don't clip your sweet clover — it's 
too great a "shock" to the crop. 

This is the advice of the Southern Illinois University agriculture 
department, reports Dr. L.R. Tucker, acting chairman, after some 
practical experiments on the University Farm. 

Contrary to the red clover, growing in the central part of the 
state, which is not damaged by clipping, the sweet clover prevalent in 
Southern Illinois, even when clipped as high as a mower will clip it, 
is "drastically shocked" by clipping, Dr. Tucker declares. 

During the year, workmen on the University Farm were instructed to 
clip with their mowing machines the weeds in thesfield along the road, 
to improve the appearance of the farm. The clover was clipped along 
with the weeds in this area. Clover planted in the wheat stubble in 
-the fields proper was not clipped, however. 

On April 9, an examination of the two treatments showed that the 
clipped clover had not more than one-third as much top growth as the 
undipped clover, Dr. Tucker said, and some of the roots had been 
■partially heaved out of the ground during the winter. 

ITTfff 



Carbondale, 111., April -David Kenney of Carbondale, gradual 
student at Southern Illinois University, has received an appointment to 
a half-time assistantship in political science at the University of 
Illinois for next year, according to Dr. Willis G. Swartz, chairman of 
the graduate studies committee here. 

Kenney' s appointment carries a stipend of ^1,200. 

A married veteran, Kenney is vice president of the Graduate Club 
at Southern, holds a graduate assistantship in government at Southern 
this year, and was recently elected to Kappa Phi Kappa, professional 
education fraternit}^. 

As an undergraduate he was active in campus affairs, serving on th 
Student Council, on the Inter-Fraternity Council, and being a member of 
Chi Delta Chi fraternity. He was elected to the Sphinx Club, campus 
*honor society. Last year he served on the Student Publications Council 
At various times he served on the staff of The Egyptian , student 
newspaper, and The Obelisk , student yearbook, and "held a number of 
, offices in his class and his fraternity. He was also chosen for 
i| inclusion in Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Uni\ 






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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 4-19-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., April - Southern Illinois University* s track 
team won its second consecutive meet of the season by crushing St. 
Louis University here last Saturday 116 to 15. 

Coach Leland P. ' ? Doc ?? Lingle's men won every first place and 
swept six events in piling up one of their most decisive victories in 
history and in preparing for their third home meet of the season 
against Cape Girardeau, Wednesday, April 21. 

Joe Hughes of West Frankfort was the star of the meet, winning 
first in both hurdle races and placing second in the pole vault. 

The results: 

Mile run: Joe KlcLafferty, Carbondale, (S.I.U.); O'Halloran (St.L'.i 
and Harold Klingenoerg, Nashville, (S.I.U. ); time: 4:39.5s. 

440 Yard Run: George Beltz, Marion (S.I.U. ); Bill Winning, Herrin 
(S.I.U. ); and Mile Sortal, Zeigler (S.I.U.): time: 53. 8s. 

100* Yard Dash: Joe 3udde, Belleville (S . I ,U .) ; Williams (St .L) ; and 
Bill Chapman, Raymond (S .1 .U . ) : time: lc.3s. 

120 Yard High Hurdles: Joe Hughes, West Frankfort (S .1 .U .) ; Dover if 
(St. L.); Gene J'lc Far land, Johnston City(S .1 .U . ) ; time: 16. Is. 

880 Yard Run: Beltz ( S .1 .U .) ; Lawrence Taliana, Mt . Vernon (S .1 .U. ) 
and Walsh (St. L.): time: 2.07.9s. 

220 Yard Dash; Budde (S .1 .U . ) ; Chapman ( S .1 .U ..) ; and Williams ( St .L. ) : 
time : 23 .Is . 

220 Yard Low Hurdles: Hughes ( S .1 .U .) ; Willis Anderson, Texas 
(S.I.U.); and Bill Hayse, Benton( S .1 .U . ) ; time: 25.7s. 

Shot Put: Charlie Mathieu, Eldorado (S .1 .U . ) ; Truman Hill, Benton 
(S.I.U.); and Jim Cole, Norris City ( S.I .U .) ; distance: 41' 9 1 '. 

Javelin: Cole(S.I.U . ) ; Anderson ( S. I.U .) ; and Paul Moss, Christophe 
(S.I.U. ) : distance: 159' 3". 

Discus: Quentin Stinson, Eldorado ( S. I.U .) ; Cole( S.I.U . ) : Hill (S.I. 
distance: 142' 7". 

Pole Vault: Bob Neighbors, Belleville ( S .1 .U .) ; Hughes (S.I .U. ) ; and 
Norris Garner, Wayne City (S .1 .U . ) : height: 12 w . 

High Jump: Harold Hartley, Ashley (S .1 .U .) ; Cole (S. I.U .) ; and Dale 
(St. L.) : height: 5 ! 10j". 

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" Broad Jump: Broder (S .1 .U . ) ; Adrain Stonecipher, Salem(S.I.U . ) ; 
and Menard (St. L.): distance: 21' 6 7/3". 

Relay: Won by Southern (Jack Creek, Herrin, Sortal, Winning, ?nd 
Beltz): time: 3:33.5s. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., April - Glenn "Abe "^Martin' s Southern Illinois 
University Maroon baseballers journey to Evansville Tuesday, April 20, 
to face the Purple Aces of Evansville College. 

The Maroon diamond men had a bad weekend, losing two Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference games to Western Illinois State 
College. Southern's win-loss record now stands at one victory cP-ainst 
three defeats. 

Inspite of the defeats, the Maroons were encouraging at the plate. 
Bill Bleyer of Carterville and Don Glover of lit . Vernon pounded the 
ball hard in both games. Bleyer, second baseman, rapped out six hits 
including a homerun, two doubles, and a triple, and Glover, at the 
initial . sack, smashed out t wo round-trippers. 



Carbondale, 111., April - Southern Illinois University's tennis 
team will have two opportunities to enter the win column this week whe: 
they t angle with Evanville at Evansville Tuesday, April 20, and Cape 
Girardeau at Carbondale, Tuesday April 20. 

To date, Coach Bill Freeburg's netsters have proved an easy touch 
for their opponents, but Free burg is optimistic that with increased 
experience the Maroons will begin winning. 

Jack Mawdsley of Granite City is the only Maroon to win an 
individual match thus far, which he did last Saturday when he dropped 
Ed Van Dorsten of St. Louis, 7-5 > 6-3 as Southern lost the meet 6-1. 

ffrfif 






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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lor en a Drummond , Editor 



4-20-4^ - 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111,, April - Scheduling of two games with the 
Marion Class D club of the Illinois State League for Wednesday and 
Thursday, April 21 and 22, will give the Southern Illinois University 
Maroon baseball team an exceptionally busy week. 

Addition of these games, which will be played at Marion at 3:00 
p.m., means that the Maroons will play four games in five days, 

Tuesday Southern went ^to Evansville to battle the Purple Aces, 
and Saturday they are scheduled for their next home encounter, which 
will be against Arkansas State College, 

Going into the Evansville encounter, Glenn "Abe" Martin 1 s players 
had 1-3 win-loss record. 



7/7/ tr 






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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-20-43 
Carbondale, 111., April - Arnold Wendt of Red Bud, a graduate 
assistant in mathematics at Southern Illinois University, has been 
appointed to a University fellowship st the University of Wisconsin for 
194&-49, according to Dr. W. C. McDaniel, acting chairman of the 
Southern mathematics department. 

The fellowship is in the mathematics department in association 
rith the Wisconsin School of Education. 

Wendt entered Southern as a freshman in 1941. In March, 1943, he 
rent into the Army and was sent to the University of Wisconsin to 
)egin training in meteorology. In the fall of that year he was transfer 
,o the University of Chicago, where he obtained a 3.S. degree in 
leteorology in June, 1944. 

After leaving the service in 1946 he returned to the University of 
Chicago for further work in mathematics and education. 

Last fall he returned to Southern as a graduate assistant, and 
pias been teaching half-time in the mathematics department while 
completing work on the degree master of science in education, which he 
will receive in June. 



Carbondale, 111., A'pril - Several Southern Illinois University 

faculty members will attend the Midwest Economic Association meetings 

at Minneapolis, Minn., April 29-May 1. They include Dr. J. W. Scott, 

'chairman of the business- administration department, Dr. Lewis A. Maveric 

chairman of the economics department, and Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the 
College of Vocations and Professions. 

Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, chairman of the sociology department, will 

also attend sociological society sessions at the same time in 

Minneapolis . 

j.iji 
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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-20-43 

Carbondale, 111., April - Approximately 130 top-ranking high 
school seniors of Southern Illinois will be guests of Southern Illinois 
University here Friday and Saturday for the second annual Hospitality 
Week-Lnd. 

They will visit classes, c-et to know student and faculty leaders, 
get advance information on their probable courses of study, and go 
through a round of typical college social activity. 

Opening with registration at 9a. m., the week-end will get under 
way with a general convocation at 10 a. m. at which Dr. Charles D. 
Tenney, administrative assistant to the President, and three academic 
deans, Dr. T. W. Abbott of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey of the College of Education, and Dr. Henr ir J.~ 
Rehn of the College of Vocations and Professions, will address the 
visitors . 

At an afternoon convocation, Dr. Hiskey, who is dean of men as well 
as acting dean of the College of Education, will again appear before the 
students, to discuss services of the University personnel offices, and 
Miss Doris Sewell, assistant to the dean of women, will discuss social 
activities . 

On Saturday morning, a "Southern Style'" student life convocation 
will be held, with student leaders discussing the variety of student 
activities available at Southern — service clubs, Greek-letter 
fraternities and sororities, independent student organizations, 
publications, religious organizations, athletics for men. and women, 
honor and professional organizations, musical and dramatic i?rou^s, and 
special-interest clubs. 

The Maroon Band, the Little Theatre, the Madrigal Singers, the 
University Chorus, Sing and Swing folk-dancing club, and numerous 
individual students will perform for the visiting seniors. 

At the. closing Saturday luncheon W. G. Cisne, professor emeritus 
and former director of placements, will address the visitors briefly. 

On Saturday afternoon there will be a trs ck meet and ■ a tennis^meet 
with Illinois State Normal University, and a base ball game with 
Arkansas State, Which the high school seniors may attend. 



s 



MdM 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



A-20-4S 
Carbondale, 111., April - Two Southern Illinois University 

faculty members appeared before the Centralia Rotary Club on Monday. 
Prof., E. G. Lentz, past district president of Rotary, was the 

featured speaker at the meeting, and Raymond H. Dey, director of the 

Extension Service at the University, accompanied Dean Lentz and also 

■ 
spoke briefly to the club's members. 

The invitation to address the club came through Sen. Ora Oldfield 

of Centralia. 

ffffff 

< 
Carbondale, 111., April - Dr. Harold Briggs, professor and 

chairman of the history department at Southern Illinois University, and 

Dr. William A. Fitkin, associate professor of social sciences, will 

attend the meeting of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association in 

Rock Island, 111., April 22-23 . 

m 

Carbondale, 111., April - Dr. Maurits Kesner, professor and 
chairman of the music department at Southern Illinois University, and 
Harold C. Hines, instructor and band director, will attend the Music 
Educator's National Conference in Detroit, Mich*, April 19-23. 



Carbondale, 111., April - Dr. Vera L. Peacock, professor and 
chairman of the foreign language, department at Southern Illinois 
University, will present a paper April 23 on "An Expanded Foreign 
Language Program "in Teacher Training Institutions" before a foreign 
language conference at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky, 

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From Information Service, Southern Illinois University 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



' 4-21-43 

Carbondale, 111*, April -Sixteen Southern Illinois University 
journalism students and staff members of the school paper will attend 
the meeting of the Illinois College Press Association convention to 
be held near Monticello Saturday, April 24. 

The meeting is to be held at the Allerton Estate, which was 
recently given to the University of Illinois, 

The students, who will be accompanied by Robert A. Steffes, acting- 
chairman of the journalism department and editorial sponsor of The 
Egyptian , and Dr. Viola DuFrain, fiscal sponsor of the paper include: 
Oliver Vernor of Wood River, Marilyn Provart, DuQuoin; Johnnie 
DeLeonardo, Marion; Fred Senters, Flora; Ralph F. Gruebmeyer, Jacob; 
Dick Woods, Mt , Carmel; Shirley Ware^ Bridgeport, 

Robert Brayfield, Harrisburg; Lawrence Coates, East St. Louis; 
Mary Alice Newsom, Marion; Pat Boatright, Marion; George Denison, 
Carbondale; Donald R. Grubb, Vergennes; June Ferguson, Herrin; Gene 
Flowers, Christopher and Bill Hollada, Benton. 

#### . 

Carbondale, 111., April -Richard G. Kohler, instructor in 
industrial education at Southern Illinois University, has been asked 
to prepare a section on "Art Metal" for a new bulletin on industrial 
arts to be issued by the State Department of Vocational Education. 

Mr. Kohler will prepare a detail course outline, including 
instructional references and equipment required. 

Dale Roberts, state supervisor of industrial arts for the state 
department recently visited Southern's industrial education department 
in connection with the proposed bulletins. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., April -Industrial education students at 
Southern Illinois University recently visited the Koppers Company Wood 
Preserving Division plant here, observing production processes made 
available by recently added new equipment, according to Dr. W.C. 
Bicknell, chairman of the department. 

The "tie plant," as the wood preserving concern is known, treats 
railway ties. 

Arrangements for the students' visit were made by George Marvin 
of Murphysboro, president of the Industrial Education Club, in 
cooperation with Paul Gibson, superintendent of the Carbondale treatin? 
plant. 

m 






From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-21-43 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., April - Three wins out of four tries was the 
Tuesday record of Southern Illinois University athletes. 

The Maroons defeated Cape Girardeau in track 96 1/3 to 34 2/3 at 
Carbondale while at Evansville the baseball team defeated the Evansville 
Purple Aces 6 to 4 in 15 innings, the tennis team won easily 7 to 0, 
and the golf team lost 11 to 4. 

In winning, track Coach Lelend F. "Doc :? Lingle's charges chalked- 
up their third consecutive overwhelming victory in as many tries. 
Southern took firsts and seconds in 11 events, and swepf both of the 
hurdle races. 

Southern's ace freshman miler, Joe McLafferty of Carbondale, lost 
his first college race to Cape's brilliant distence man, Corse, who 
clocked the distance in 4:28.1s. 

Maroon Ccptain George Beltz of Marion ?ncl Jim Cole of Korris City 
were outstanding. Beltz won the 880 ana took second in the 440 while 
Cole won the javelin and took second in the discus. 

Fortsider Marion iioake of Marion went the entire 15-inning route 
against Lvansville , allowing only seven hits as he carved out his second 
victory of the season. Although he wes often in the hole, Moake's 
pitching was never better than when the pressure was on. 

Slugging freshman Don Glover of Mt . Vernon continued his home-run 
feats. Glover banged his third four-bagger in three games, this one witV 
two on in the third stanza. 

Bill Freeburg' s tennis team tasted victory for the first time 
against Evansville as the Maroons defeated the Purple Aces in straight 
sets. • 

Results : 
^Bill Williams of Galatia(S) over Boswell: 6-0, 6-2. 
Jack Mawdsley of Granite City(S) over Cook: 6-2, 6-2. 
Dick Vorwald of Granite City(S) over Hopkins: 6-3, 7-5. 
Bob Armstrong of Carbondale ( S) over Schmidt: 6-0, 6-0. 
Bob Harmon of Lincoln(S) over Hostelfer: 6-2, 7-5 

Doubles: 
Williams and Mawdsley (S) over Boswell and Robinson: 6-2, 7-5. 
Armstrong and Q.D. Miskell of Carbondale over Smith and Sakel: 6-C, 6-1. 

although the Maroon golfers lost to Lvansville, Ollie Shoaff 
of Mt . Carmel salvaged the Maroon honor by shooting 75, the low score 
for the day. 



I 






From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors: 4-22-4^ 

Carbondale, 111., April - Southern Illinois University's golf 

and tennis team won meets Wednesday, April 21, from Cape Girardeau, 

The golf team swamped Cape 12 to 3 in earning its first win in tv/o 

efforts. OIlie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel again shot the low score in the 

match, totaling 77 for the 13 holes of the DuQuoin Country Club where 

the meet was held. 

The Maroon netsters gained their second straight shutout, topping 

Cape Girardeau 6 to 0. The previous day they had defeated Evensville's 

Purple Aces 7 to 0, and now boast two wins against two losses for the 

season. 

mff 



Carbondale, 111,, April - Leland F, "Doc" Lingle's Southern 
Illinois University track team will be shooting for its fourth 
consecutive overwhelming victory Saturday, April 24, when they face 
Illinois Normal University in a dual meet at Mc Andrew Stadium at 
1:30 p.m. 

The Linglemen have previously defeated Western Illinois, St. Louis 
University, and Cape Girardeau by doubling the score on those teams, 
; frrrff 







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• 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 






Attention: Sports Editors 4-22-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., April - When Arkansas State College invades 
Southern Illinois University Saturday, April 24, at 2:00 p.m. for a 
baseball game, the Southern Maroons will be playing their first game 
in two seasons on a home field. 

The Maroon's new field, which is located on VJest Chautaucua Street, 
will be available for the first time. Southern's old field was 
sacrificed to make way for a Veteran's Housinsr Unit, and Saturday 
will be the first game in two seasons played on a University field. 

Baseball Coach Glenn ,( Abe w Martin is not certain who will draw 
the starting mound assignment, but it is probable that southpaw 
Marion Moake of Marion will be on the hill. 

Moake has pitched both of Southern's victories, the last one 
Tuesday when he carved out a seven-hit"^- 15-inning masterpiece s gainst 
Evansville College as the Maroons won, 6 to 4. <.alt Frazer of 
Pinckneyville will be behind the bat. 

Three Southern regulars are boasting high batting avereges. 
Right fielder Bill Bauer of Freeburg is hitting a phenominal .500 
and second baseman Bill Bleyer of Carterville follows with a highly 
respectable .467, including one homer. 

First baseman Don Glover of Mt . Vernon has a .333 mark, but three 
of his five hits have been home-runs, one each in the last three Tames 
since he has been playing regularly. 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-26-43 

Carbondale, 111., April - Two faculty appointments for next fall-- 
a rural sociologist to spend part of his time in field work end an 
accountant--and several for the summer term have been announced by 
Southern Illinois University President Chester F. Lay. 

Ur. W. J. Tudor from Iowa State College has been appointed associtt- 
professor of sociology, effective next September. Dr. Tudor holds the 
bachelor's and master's degrees from Ohio State University and the docto: 
degree from Iowa State. .He is currently on the staff of Iowa Stcte as 
a specialist in rural sociology, and formerly taught at Rhode Island 
State College. 

Here at Southern he will spend part of his time in field research 
work in Southern Illinois rural communities. 

William R. Matthies has been named assistant professor of business 
administration, effective next fall. Mr. Matthies holds the bachelor's 
degree from Northwestern University and the master' s degree from the 
University of Colorado. He is a certified public accountant, holding 
this rating in both Illinois and Wisconsin. He has taught at Oklahoma 
A & M College, Miami University in Ohio, the University of Idaho and 
De Paul University. He will teach courses in accounting here at Southeri 

Summer appointments include: 

Earl Dawes as instructor in education, to work on summer workshops 
at Centralia and Cairo. Mr. Dawes, who holds the bachelor's degree from 
Southern and the master's degree from Washington University, is now 
assistant county superintendent at Belleville. He formerly taught in 
Illinois public schools and at McKendree College. 

Miss Amy Turnell as instructor in physical education for women. 
Holder of the bachelor's degree from the State University of Iowa, Miss 
Turnell has taught in Missouri and Illinois public schools and is now 
on the faculty at Denison University. 

Woodrow Fildes and Arnold Wendt as faculty assistants in mathematics 
Both hold the bachelor's degree from Southern and will complete the 
master's degree here in June, and both are now teaching mathematics as 
graduate assistants. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-26-43 
Carbondale, 111., April - A Southern Illinois University co-ed, 
Ruth Beach of Herrin, was elected secretary of the Illinois Student 
Convention of the Disciples^, of Christ at the organization' s meeting 
in Peoria last week-end. 

A large delegation of Southern students attended the conference. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - A Southern Illinois high school girl, 
Grace Fulkerson of Carbondale, was elected second vice president of 
the Illinois Association of Student Councils in Peoria last Saturday, 
according to Jean Fligor, instructor in University High School at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Miss Fulkerson is a junior in University High. 

Accompanied by Fligor, Miss Fulkerson and five other U. High 
students attended the association meeting--Gob Reinhardt, Mary Cole, 
Alvin Griffith, Carolyn Reed and Lyn Barry. 



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Carbondale } 111., April - The Southern Illinois Historical 
Society will hold its spring meeting April 30 at 6:30 p. m. at the First 
Methodist Church in Marion, according to E. G. Lentz, professor of 
history at Southern Illinois University and secretary of the society. 

Prof. Truman Dorris, a Southern Illinois man now on the faculty 
of the State Teschers College, Richmond, Ky., will present a paper on 
Gen. Michael Lawler, Civil War hero of Saline County, and Mrs. Alice 
Harris Wheeler will speak on "Old Sulphur Springs and Vicinity," a 
well-known watering place three-quarters of a century ago. 

Reservations for the dinner meeting should be made not later than 
April 28 with E. M. Stotlar, Marion, 111., Dean Lentz seid. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-26-4S 

Carbondale, 111., April - Mrs. Edith M. Krappe, assistant 
professor of English at Southern Illinois University, has been awarded 
one of three graduate fellowships for women at the University of 
Pennsylvania for 1943-49. 

Mrs. Krappe is on Sabbatical leave of absence during the current 
school year to study toward the doctor's degree at the University of 
Pennsylvania, and her leave will be extended for 194&-49 to enable 
her to accept the fellowship, according to the President's Office st 
Southern. 

Mrs. Krappe came to Southern in 1929. She holds the bachelor's 
and master's degrees from the University of Iowa, and hes done advanced 
study at Indiana University and the University of Minnesota. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - Appointment of Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham 
as chairman of the geography department at Southern Illinois University 
effective at the beginning of the summer term, has been announced by 
University Fresident Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Cunningham^ who joined the Southern f acuity in the fall of 
1947, has been serving as acting chairman of the department. 

A graduate of Eastern Illinois State College and holder of the 
master's and doctor's degrees from Clark University, Worcester, Mass., 
Dr. Cunningham for 17 years had headed the geography department at 
State Teachers College, Florence, Ala, 

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Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-26-4^ 
Carbondale, 111., April - The State Teachers College Board will 
hold its regular spring meeting here in Carbondale Monday May 3, with 
Southern Illinois University as host, according to University President 
Chester F. Lay. 

On Sunday evening preceding the board meeting, members of the board 
and presidents of the other institutions in the State Teachers College 
System—Illinois State Normal University, Eastern Illinois State 
College, Western Illinois State College, and Northern Illinois State 
Teachers College--will be entertained at dinner at Anthony Hall, 

Following the dinner, at 8 p. m., an informal reception will be 
held in honor of the board members and the visiting presidents, to 
which all Southern faculty members and their wives or husbands have 
been invited. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - For more than two decades, Leland P. 
"Doc" Lingle, track coach at Southern Illinois University, has served 
as referee and starter for the annual relays for Southern Illinois 
high schools at Herrin % 

On last Friday afternoon he again performed in capacity. To the 
best of Lingle 1 s memory, he has missed only one year since the relays 
started some 20-odd years ago. 

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Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-26-43 



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Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., April -Southern Illinois University's 
undefeated track team raced to its fourth consecutive one-sided victory 
against Illinois Normal University here Saturday while the Maroon tenni; 
team was defeating the Normal netsters and the Southern baseball team 
was losing to Arkansas State College. 

Coach Leland P. !i Doc !? Lingle's powerful well-balanced aggregation 
won in a breeze, 101 l/3 to 29 2/3. Southern took 13 firsts, losing 
only in the 880 and the mile relay. 

Joe Hughes of West Frankfort and Joe McLafferty of Carbondale were 
both double winners for the Maroons, Hughes winning both the high and 
low hurdles while McLafferty was annexing first place in both the mile 
and the two mile runs. 

Southern's tennis team swamped Normal 7 to 2 for its third 
consecutive victory after two early season defeats. Coach Bill Freebur; 
charges won five of six singles matches and two of three doubles matche; 

Rill Williams of Galatia, Jack Mawdsley of Granite City, Bob 
t? Squire' ? Armstrong of Carbondale, Bob Harmon of Lincoln, and Rill 
"Pin-Head" Price of Texico won singles matches for the Maroons. Dick 
Vorwald of Granite City was stopped by Normal's Merlin Belle 6-2, 2-6, 
6-4 for the only singles defeat. 

In doubles play, Williams and Mawdsley, number one, and Armstrong 
and Q.D. Miskell of Carbondale, number two, each won. Harmon and Nick 
Kostoff of Granite City dropped their number three match to Blakeman 
and Hertz of Normal 6-2, 6-1. 

The Indians of Arkansas State took the Maroon's measure in baseball 

for the second time, 8-to 6. Previously at Jonesboro, Arkansas, the 

Indians had won 3 to 2. 

Renny Wilhelm earned the pitching decision over Southern's Bernard 
Heiligenstein of Freeburg. Heiligenstein pitched beautifully until 
Maroon fielding lapses behind him exhausted his energy, forcing him to 
give way in the seventh inning to relief-hurler Byron Hargis of Ellis 
Grove. 

Southern established an early 6 to 2 lead, but it wilted in the 
sixth inning when Arkansas scored four times on three errors, a walk, 
and a hit. The Indians iced the game in the seventh with two more runs. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-27-43 

Carbondale, 111., April 27 - The dusky halo which appeared 
around the sun early this afternoon is a phenomenon almost as rare as 
hen's teeth, but it has a simple enough scientific explanation, 
according to Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham, Southern Illinois University 
geographer . 

The huge ring of cloud-like vapor, which resembled a rainbow 
in black-and-white, was caused by bending of the sun's rays against 
cirro-stratus or ice clouds, Dr. Cunningham explained. 

Appearance of the cirro-stratus clouds are often the sign of 
approaching weather disturbances, he added. 

"We often see such 'rings' around the moon," he said, "but 

because of the intensity of the sun's light, we don't often see much 

a ring around the sun." 

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Carbondale, 111., April - A group of faculty and graduate 

students from the government department at Southern Illinois University 

will attend the annual Midwest Conference of Political Scientists at 

Indianapolis, according to Dr. Willis G. Swart z, department chairman. 

Faculty members who will make the trip are Dr. Orville Alexander, 

Dr. 
Dr. Frank L. Klingberg, and/Max W. Turner. Graduate students to go 

are David Kenney of Carbondale, Carl Wimberly of Granite City, William 

Hatley of Carbondale, Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, and Mrs. 

Maxine Harris Blackman of Ramsey and Carbondale . 

Dr. Swartz will participate in a panel discussion oh the subject 

"The Relation Between Political Science and Labor-Management Relations. 1 ' 

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From the Southerh Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-27-43 

Carbondale, 111., April - The Clare Tree Major Children's 
Theatre will be brought back to Southern Illinois May 15 by the 
Carbondale branch of the American Association of University Women, 
Mrs. Minnie Mae Pitkin, 1947-4$ president of the branch, has announced. 

This dramatic group will present "Penrod," based on the book by 
Booth Tarkington, at 10; 30 a. m. in Shryock Auditorium at Southern 
Illinois University. 

Last year, the players presented "Heidi" and played to a capacity 
audience of Southern Illinois school children. 

Throughout the country, branches of AAUW present dramatic 
performances by this theatrical g roup which specialized in drama for 
children. Proceeds go to the AAUW fellowship fund. 

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Carbondale, 111., April - The Egyptian, school newspaper at 
Southern Illinois University, won three awards at the recent Illinois 
College Press Association meeting. 

Donald R. Grubb of Vergennes was author of r news story which won 
a second class award, while an original cartoon drawn by Bill Plater 
of Vienna also won recognition, and a sports feature written by Ralph 
Gruebmeyer of Jacob was given an honorable mention rating, 

Grubb is news editor of The Egyptian , Plater is staff cartoonist, 
and Gruebmeyer is a staff reporter. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 



4-27-43 
Carbondale, 111., April - Alice Newhouse of Steger, voice 

student at Southern Illinois University, will be presented in a senior 

recital May 5 at 8 p. m. in the Little Theatre. 

Miss Newhouse, a student under Floyd V. V/akeland, associate 

professor of music, will be assisted at the piano by Betty McHenry 

of Vienna. 

The recital will be open to the public, without charge, 

m 






Carbondale, 111., April - John Wharton, instructor in music 
at Southern Illinois University, will be presented by the music 
department in a violin concert Tuesday, May 12, Dr. Maurits Kesnar, 
department chairman, has announced. 

The concert, to be given in the Little Theatre at $ p. m., will 
be open to the public. 



Carbondale, 111,, April - Two lecture-demonstrations on the use 
of milk in cookery will be given at Southern Illinois University May 14 
by Miss Marguerite Robinson of the Research and Education Division, 
Evaporated Milk Association of Chicago, Mrs. Mary Louise Barnes of the 
University's home economics department faculty has announced. 

Miss Robinson will present one lecture at 9:30 a. m. for College 
students, while a second lecture will be given at 7*30 p.m. which 
will be open to the general public. The lecture-demonstrations will 
be given in the home economics department cooking laboratory, Main 
Building 110. 

Speical invitations are being issued t o the Student Wives Club 
and to householders who feed students, Mrs. Barnes said. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service Hl. 

Lorena Drummond, Editor B ^"n 



4-23-48 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbonoale , 111., April - The greatest right-harided hitter in 
modern baseball history, Rogers Hornsby, will be on the Southern 
Illinois University c arnpus May 5. 

Hornsby heads the Chicago Daily News Free Baseball School which 
will hold a session at 2:00 p.m. on Southern's Chautauqua Street 
diamond. 

Previous to the open-air class-session the "Rajah" will appear at 
a luncheon at the Roberts Hotel at 12:10 p.m., accord ing to Southern 
Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, host for the visit of the 
baseball school, 

Accompanying Hornsby will be Jack Ryan, Daily News sports -writer, 
and Johnny Orr, a former baseball player whose efforts for a place in 
a major league were ruined by a chronic sore arm. 

Hornsby, with Orr's assistance, will give instruction and pointers 
on how to play all positions, and will give individual attention to all 
possible youngsters. 

Among his numerous -records, one of the most notable is a .420 
batting average for one year, the highest in modern baseball. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 4-23^4& 

Carbondale, 111., April - Eying; their fifth consecutive victory, 

the Southern Illinois University tricksters of Leland P. "Doc" Lingle 

visit Eastern Illinois at Charleston Saturcay, May 1. 

The Maroons have encountered no competition in any meet this 

season, defeating Western Illinois, St. Louis University, Cape 

Girardeau^ end Illinois Normal University in succession, each by a 

doubled score or more. 

But Southern is anxious to meet Charleston, who "Doc" Lingle 

expects to provide the strongest competition thus far. 



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Carbondale, 111., April - Revenge is the purpose of the 
Southern Illinois University tennis team which will invade St. Louis 
University Friday for a return match. 

St*. Louis handily defeated Southern earlier in the season, but 
since that time the Maroons of Coach Bill Freeburg have improved 
greatly, winning their last three matches against Cape Girardeau, 
Evansville, and Illinois Normal in easy fashion. 

When St. Louis earned its win over Southern, the Maroons had had 
very little time to get in shape. But in only the last two weeks, 
their game has improved, remarkably, and now they feel that they may be 
able to even the score with the Billikins. 






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From'* the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor "^N 



4-29-4^ 

Carbondale, 111,, April - Fred L. Senters j, Jr., Flora, recently 
sold a full-length magazine article written in a technical writing 
class at Southern Illinois University, 

The article j which will appear in Better Living magazine, is 
illustrated 'with one photograph of Senters at his duties as editor of 
the Egyp tian , student weekly at Southern. 

The article concerns the student's adaptation to an electric 
hearing aid which became necessary following an ear injury in World 
War II. The magazine, Better Living, is published by a national 
hearing aid company. In addition to generous payment for the article 
and enthusiastic reception of the material, Senters was offered a 
position with the hearing aid company s 

"It is the first time a college class ever paid off for me i " 
said Senters, A sophomore at Southern, Senters is majoring in English 
and minoring in journalism. He is a member of Nu Epsilon Alpha 
fraternity and a member of the Writer's Club. 



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Carbondale, 111., April - At 6:00 P.M. on May 3 and 4, the 
Little Theatre of Southern Illinois University will present in Shryock 
Auditorium, a three-act serious-comedy entitled "Death Takes a Holiday, 

It was written by Alberto Cassella and adapted to the American 

stage by Walter Ferris, The play is a fantasy about Death T s visit to 

earth in an effort to discover why men fear him. 

In 1937 it was made into a movie starring Frederic March and 
received high praise from critics. 

The Little Theatre production will be directed by Dr. Archibald 
McLeod, Associate Professor of Speech. 

The cast includes: George Siefertj DuQuoin; \ T anda Bennett, 
Christopher; Pat Stull, Zeigler; Phyllis Johnson, DuQuoin; Mike 
McQueeny, Wheaton; Tom Sloan, West Frankfort; Bill Braden, Alton; 
Bob Veach, Herrin; Pat Maneese, Herrin; Ed Melvin, Tamaroa; Jerry 
Seltzer, Altamont, 

The public is invited, Admission will be fifty cents, tax 
included* 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 



Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-3-4o 

Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University's undefeatec 
Maroon track team continued its winning ways by defeating Eastern 
Illinois State College 76 l/3 to 54 2/3 Saturday at Charleston while the 
Maroon tennis and golf teams were being narrowly defected by St. Louis 
Universit}/ and Western Illinois State College, respectively. 

Coach Leland P. v? Doc' ? Lingle guided his crew to their fifth 
consecutive aual victory as Eastern came closer to giving the Maroons 
a real battle than an^r team yet this see son. 

Southern has now easily topped three Illinois : Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference opponents, Western, Normal, and Eastern, leaving 
only a strong Northern team to be looked for as competition in I. I. A. ( 
meet to be held May 22 in Carbonaale. 

Double winners for the Maroons were Joe McLafferty of Carbondale 
in the mile and two-mile and Joe Budde of Belleville in the 100 and 
220. Captain George Beltz of Marion won the 440, Gene McFarland of 
Johnston City captured the high hurdles, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado 
hac the best discus throw, and Bill Winning of Herrin won the high 
jump. Bob Neighbors of Belleville tied with Eastern's Hudson in the 
pole vault . 

Southern's net team very nearly avenged a previous shut-out by 
St. Louis, forcing the Billikins to go all-out to win 4 to 3 . Bill 
Freeburg' s racket men have been developing very rapidly, and even though 
they are all new to intercollegiate courts, they may be able to defend 
successfully Southern's I. I. A. C. title. 

Ollie Shoaff of Mt . Carrnel put together a 35-37 to pace the field 
and capture three points, ana Ralph Parrish of Carbondale burned down 
the last nine holes in 34 to win his match, but Western won 9 to 6. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Lditor 

5-3-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Three Southern Illinois hieh school 
teachers have been arpointed to the faculty of Southern Illinois 
University for the summer term, June 14-August 6, to teach in University 
High School, according to University President Chester F, Lay. 

Miss Thelma Phillips of Centralia, Kenneth E. Cross of Mt . Vernon 
and David M. Stroun of Anna- Jonesboro have all been appointed instructor 
on the University staff for the summer session. 

Miss Phillips is a commerce teacher at the Centralia High School. 
She holds the bachelor's degree from Southern and the master's degree 
from the University of Illinois. 

Mr. Cross, who teaches in the i"It . Vernon Township High School, hold 
the bachelor's degree from Southern and the master's degree from the 
University of Michigan. 

Mr. Stroup, teacher of social studies in the Anna- Jonesboro High 
School, is likewise a graduate of Southern and holds the master's degree 
from the University of Illinois, 

a fourth short-term appointment was also announced by President 
Lay, that of Mrs. Ernestine Cox Taylor of Carbondale as faculty 
assistant in music for the period May 3 to June 11, to substitute for 
Mrs. Helen Matthes, on leave of absence. Mrs. Taylor holds the 
bachelor' s degree from Southern and has had two years of private 
instruction in voice, violin and piano. 

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Carbondale, 111., May - Dr. Vera L. Peacock, professor and 
chairman of the language department at Southern Illinois University, wii 
appear on the program of the Foreign Language Conference at Northwestern 
State College, Natchitoches, La., May 7. Her subject will be "An 
Expanded Program for Foreign Languages in Teacher Training Institutions. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-3-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - The Women's Athletic Association at 
Southern Illinois University will be host to co-eds from Southeast 
Missouri State Teachers College, Cape Girardeau, for a Sports Day here 
Saturday, May 15, according to Dr. Dorothy Davie s, chairman of the 
Southern women's physical education department. 

Activities on the aay' s schedule include archery, table tennis, 
lawn tennis, soft ball and badminton. The Southern girls will entertain 
the visitors at luncheon, and are planning an hour of get-acquainted 
stunts and recreational activities. 

On Saturday, May 3, the Southern WAA group will go to Elsah, 111., 
to engage in a Sports Day with girls of Principia College. 

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5-3-43 
Carbondale, 111., May - Two outstanding high school bands from 
Southern Illinois will be presented in concerts at Southern Illinois 
University in the near future, according to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, chairman 
of the University music department. 

The SO-piece West Frankfort band, directed by Theodore Taschdag, wi.' 
be presented May 10 at 3 p. m. in Shryock Auditorium, and on Thursday, 
May 13, the 78-piece Granite City Band, directed by Louis Meek, will 
play a concert at 2 p. m., also in the auditorium. 

The public is invited to both concerts, Dr. Kesnar said, 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-5-42 

Carbondale, 111., May - A Southern Illinois University graduate. 
Dr. Richard T. Arnold,- has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for a 
year's study abroad, according to Dr. J. W. Neckers, professor and 
chairman of the Southern chemistry department. 

Dr. Arnold, who graduated from Southern in 193 A and is now professor 
of chemistry at the University of Minnesota, was one of six chemists 
in the U. S. and Canada chosen for one of these awards. 

He will spend next year in study in England. 

,9 Dr. Arnold is one of the outstanding organic chemists of the 
younger group in this country," Dr. Neckers declared. 

Hi? 



Carbondale, 111., May - Willis E. Malone, assistant to the dean 
of the College of Education at Southern Illinois University, has been 
appointed by the Southern Division of the Illinois Education 
Association to direct a movement to establish Future Teachers of 
America groups in Southern Illinois high schools. 

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at Southern Illinois University, is attending the meeting- of the 
Educational Buyers Association in Columbus, Ohio, May 5-8. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-5-43 

Carbondale, 111., May ■•• Two tennis meets, a baseball came, 
track meet, and golf meet will occupy the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons this weekend, May V and $. 

The Maroon netsters will trade strokes with Care Girardeau on 
Friday, May 7, and with Principia on Saturday, May 8. Coach Bill 
Freeburg's team will try to improve its 3-3 record, and will be favored 
to do so since previously the Maroons easily defected Cane. 

Saturday the racket-men play host to Principia in a meet starting 
at 1:00 p. m. on the Maroon courts, 

The baseball Maroons will journey to Normal Friday in an effort to 
make it two in a row over the powerful Redbirds of Illinois State 
Normal University whom they defeated 4 to 3 on April 10. 

Leland P. n Doc f Lingle's high-geared track team will be favored to 
win its sixth meet without a defeat egcinst Cape, having previously 
breezed to an overwhelming victory. 

Southern's greensmen, winners of only one golf meet this soring, 

wi 1.1 also be battling Cape Girardeau, the only team they have yet 

defeated, on Friday, May 7. 

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Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University Athletic 
Director Glenn "Abe yr Martin has been named chairman of District 20, 
the State of Illinois, of the National Association of Intercollegia u . 
Basketball. 

Martin, Southern football, baseball, and former basketball coach 
who led the Maroons to the National title in 1946, has been 
instrumental in arranging the present organization of Illinois District 
of the NAIB. 

Information of the office came in a letter to Martin from Ray 
Hanson of Western Illinois State College, national president of the NAI] 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorene Drummond, Editor 



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5-5-43 



Attention: Sports Editors 



Cprbondale, 111., May - Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin 
and Physical Education Instructor William Freeburg of the Southern 
Illinois University faculty have returned from a two-day conference 
on the training of physical education teachers at Pere-Marquette 
Lodge at Grafton, Illinois- 
Martin stated that the purpose of the meeting was to improve 
methods for training physical education teachers t College represents ti\ 
present at the conference nrofited from talks by high school principals 
in which the princioals outlined the kind of training they thought 
physical education teachers should have in order to fulfill the high 
school's requirements. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-6-48' 
Carbondale, 111., May - Four Southern Illinois University faculty 
members have been promoted in rank, with approval of the State 
Teachers College Board, which held its regular quarterly meeting here 
this week, according to University President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Dorothy Davies, chairman of the department of physical 
education for women, has been promoted from associate professor to 
assistant professor, effective next fall. Dr. Davies, who holds the 
bachelor's degree from the University of Cincinnati, the master's 
degree from Teachers College, Columbia University, and the doctor of 

(education degree from, the University of Cincinnati, has been on the 

i 
University faculty since 1939. 

Chalmer A. Gross has been promoted from instructor to assistant 
professor in the College of Education, effect ive next fall. Mr. Gross 
is on the staff of University High School and supervises practice 
teachers in sciences. He holds the bachelor's and master's degrees 
from the University of Illinois and has also studied here at Southern. 

John S. Wharton has been promoted from instructor to assistant 
professor of music, in the College of Vocations and Professions, 
effective next fall. Mr. Wharton, a violinist, holds the master of 
music degree from the American Conservatory of Music and has completed 
more than a year's work toward the doctorate degree. He joined the 
University faculty in 1945. 

Mrs. Minnie Mae Pitkin, assistant in personnel in the President's 
Office, has been promoted from faculty assistant to instructor, 
effective July 1. Mrs. Pitkin joined the University staff in 1945. 
I graduate of Texas State College for Women, she holds the master of 
science degree from the University of Colorado and has done further 
tudy at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University 
K Illinois. She has received vocational training: at the Superior 
(Wise.) Vocational School. During the war years she held a responsible 
position with a Superior (Wise.) shipyard. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service ^tH 

Lorena Drummond . Editor BL. 



Attention: Snorts Editors 5-6-4$ 

Carbondale , 111., May 6 - Southern Illinois University's baseball 
diamond yesterday swarmed with over 500 people, most of them erade 
school boys, who turned out to see Rogers Hornsby and the Chi cap - o Daily 
News Baseball School . 

The baseball clinic, which has the double purpose of grounding' 
youngsters in the rudiments of baseball knowledge and of interesting 
them in the national pastime as a means of combatting /'uvenile 
delinquency, opened with a short talk by Hornsby on the correct ways 
to throw, field aground ball, catch a fly, and hit, 

Hornsby accompanied his t alk with a demonstration of correct 
procedures, ending by showing the batting form he used to become the 
greatest right-handed hitter in modern baseball history. 

Each boy present received a turn at bat as Hornsby pitched and 
encouraged them to n hit it hard. 1 ' 

At the request of Southern baseball coach Glenn ''Abe ,? Martin, 
Hornsby watched the Maroons field and hit, and recommended various 
changes, chiefly in the matter of batting stance. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 






Carbondale, 111., May 7 - A large delegation of Southern Illinois 
University faculty members are attending the meeting of the Illinois 
Academy of Science meeting in Benton today and Saturday (May 7 and &). 

Several Southern scientists are appearing on the program: Dr. Char] 

Foote, associate professor of zoology, describing his research on the 

thyroid glands of embryo chicks; Dr. R. A. Scott, professor of chemistry, 

discussing "Chemistry for Home Economics Students"; Dr, Elbert Hadley, 

associate professor of chemistry, discussing "Industrial Electroplating"; 

Amy Jones, graduate assistant from Poplar Bluff, who will present the 

research project she has carried on for the thesis for her master's degre 

here at Southern,, 

a Southern graduate, Troy Dorris, who completed his master's degree 
here at Southern last year and is now on the faculty at Quincy College, 
will also present results of his thesis research project. 

a group of Southern faculty members will serve as judges for the 
various exhibits at the Academy meeting, including: Dr. Joseph Rafalko, 
and Mj_ss Hilda Stein, associate professor of zoology; Dr. Margaret 
Kaeiser, assistant professor of botany; Dr. W. M. Gersbacher, associate 
professor and chairman of the zoology department; Miss Charlotte 
Zimmerschied, assistant professor of physics; Dr. Wilkinson W, Meeks, 
associate professor of physics; Hal Stone, instructor in chemistry; 
Dalies A. Price, associate professor of geography; Dr. Floyd Cunningham, 
associate professor and chairman of the geography department; Elbert 
Fulkerson and Dilla Hall, assistant professors in University High School; 
Dr. Hadley. 

Dr* Walter Welch, associate professor of botany and chairman of the 
botany department at Southern, has served this year as chairman of the 
botany section of the Academy and is presiding at the sessions of this 
section, and Irving P r eithman, manager of the University Farm, is chairman 
of the anthropology-^archaeoloey section. Dr. W. M. Baile3 r , professor of 
botany, emeritus , is chairman of the Academy's history committee, and Dr, 
J. W. Neckers, professor' and chairman of the University's chemistry 
department, is acting chairman of the research grants committee* 

Other Southern faculty members graduate assistants and students who 
will attend the meeting include: 

Dr. Bruce Merwin, professor education; Dr. 0. B. Young, professor 
and chairman of the physics department, a past president of the Academy; 
Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 
professor of chemistry; William Mar berry, assistant professor of botany; 
Dr. Margaret Kaeiser, assistant professor of botany; Mrs. Irma Tate Ward, 
[faculty assistant in botany; Miss Ahnemarie Krause, assistant professor 
of geography; : Chalmer A. Gross, instructor in University High School; 
Mrs, Florence Foote, assistant professor of zoology. 

Slso Mabel Paterson of Carbondale, Donald Hankla of Anna, R, D. 
Triplett of Carterville, Homer 3adgett of Mt . Vernon, Charles Ablett of 
Metropolis, students, and Rosalie Brown of Percy, Julius Swayne of 
Du^uoin, Henry Borella of West Frankfort, graduate assistants . 

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Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drumraond, Editor 






5-6-4S 

Carbondale, 111., May -Twelve Southern Illinois University 
juniors and seniors have been elected to Sphinx Club, non-academic honor 
society, to which students are elected on the basis of campus leadership. 

The new members include: Ralph Lane of Eldorado, Patricia Tope of 
Murphysboro, Melvin Siener of Collinsville , Peggy Coleman of Marion, Dan 
Cox of West Frankfort, Virgil Spruell of Albion, Bill Burns f Chicago, 
George Beltz of Marion, Louis Gaskins of Earrisburg, Russell Fairburn of 
East St. Louis, Dorothy Sager of Paris, Tenn. , and Dick Woods of Mt. 
Carmelo 

Officers of Sphinx Club for next year, recently elected, are: Dale 
Kittle of VJayne City, president; Carlos Pleshe of Buckner, vice presideni 
Tom Middleton of Carbondale, secretary. 



Carbondale, 111,, May -Bill Plater of Vienna has been elected 
j editor of The Egyptia n, student newspaper at Southern Illinois University 
J. for next year, while Mary Alice Newsom of Marion has been chosen news 
editor and Wallace Peebles of Pittsburg, business manager. 

Robert L. East of Carbondale was elected editor of The Obelisk , 
yearbook. East was elected editor of the yearbook last year, but resigne 
to travel to Sweden as an exchange student at Stockholm University. Ee 
has now returned to Southern and will attend school here next year. 

These editors and the business manager were chosen by the Student 
Publications Council, a joint faculty-student group. 



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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-6-48 

"HI 

Carbondale, 111., May - Sabbatical leaves have been granted to "W. 

five Southern Illinois University faculty members in order to permit 
them to carry on advanced study next year, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Miss Louise Bach, assistant professor in University High School, 
plans to attend Columbia University next year to c arry on study toward 
the doctor's decree in teacher education. Miss Bach, who joined the 
Southern faculty in 1934, holds the bachelor's decree from Illinois 
Wesleyan and the master of arts decree from the University of Illinois. 

Miss Winifred Burns, assistant professor of English, will 
probably study at the University of Illinois toward the doctoral degree 
in English. She holds the bachelor of arts and the master of arts 
degrees from the University of Illinois and has done advanced study 
at the Bread Loaf School of English and the University of Chicago. 
She joined the Southern faculty in 1939. 

Robert W. English, assistant professor of industrial education, 
plans to carry on doctoral study at Perm State. He holds the bachelor'; 
degree from James Millikin University, the master's degree from the 
University of Illinois, and has done additional work at the University 
of Pennsylvania, St. Louis University and Washington University. Ke 
came to Southern in 1940. 

Willis E. Malone , assistant professor of Education, will hold an 
assistantship at Ohio State University and will carry on doctoral study 
in teacher education. A graduate of Southern, he holds the master's 
degree from Northwestern. He joined the Southern staff in 1939. 

Miss Susie Ogden, assistant professor of business administration, 
will do advanced work toward the doctor' s degree but has not yet 
announced at what institution she will study. Holder of the bachelor's 
degree from Southern, she obtained the master's degree from the 
University of Illinois and has done additional v/ork at Columbia 
Jniversity and the University of Tennessee. She has been on the 
Southern faculty since 1931. 

In addition, Mrs. Edith Krappe, assistant professor of English, 
tfho is on sabbatical leave this year, has been granted an additional 
fear's leave of absence to enable her to accept a graduate fellowship 
Tor continued doctoral study at the University of Pennsylvania. 

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From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



5-6-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - A dual-model fashion show will be held 
in Shryock Auditorium at Southern Illinois University, May 12 et 7 P.m. 
The show, sponsored by the Student Wives Club, will be open to the publi 

This unique show will model men's clothing as well as women's, 
In the past only women's clothing was featured in any of the fashion 
shows, but the Student Wives Club is givihg^a prominent piece in this 
show for men's fashions. 

Models for the show were selected from representatives of the 
it i.': dent organized houses and the Student Wives Club 

The clothing modeled will be within the price range of the averege 
student and will be furnished by Carbondale merchants. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University President 
Chester F. Lay is attending the 31st meeting of the American Council 
Dn Education in Chicago May 7-$. 



Carbondale, 111., May - Ralph Boatman, health coordinator at 
Southern Illinois University, has returned from a trip to Michigan 
tfhere he visited Michigan State College and the Kellogg Foundation. 
The Kellogg Foundation contributes to the support of Southern's 
lealth educction program for Southern Illinois, 



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University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■Hi^^H^HaiHHHBBHHHB 



(Note to Editor: Full details of the biographical sketches of President 
Lay, Dr. Merwin, Dr, Cunningham and Gen. Hodge are given so that you 
may have them for your morgue . ) 

5-7-43 
Carbondale, 111., May - Three Southern Illinois University 

people—President Chester F. Lay and two faculty members, Dr. Bruce 

Merwin and Dr, Floyd F. Cunnineham — are listed in the 1943-49 edition 

of Whoj s Who in America , just off the press* 

A fourth Carbondale man, Lt . Gen. John Reed Hodge, now commanding 

officer of U. S. occupation forces in Korea and a former Southern 

student, is also listed. 

Who' s Wh o is t? a biographical dictionary of notable living men 

and women," issued biennially since 1$97 « 



The data given on each of these four comprises the following - : 
Lay, Chester Frederic, university president; born, Pope County, 111. 
Feb. 3, 1395; son, Joseph, and Hilda (Chester) Lay; bachelor of education 
degree, Illinois State Normal University, 1917; master of arts decree, 
University of Chicago, 1923, doctor of philosophy degree, 1931; married 
Harriet Lewis, Sept. 29, 1917; children—Lewis Chester, Coy Lafayette, 
Lois Jo Harriet (Mrs* Raymond Lackore). Public school teacher, Will 
County, Illinois, 1913-14; principal, Moweaqua (Illinois) Hi eh School, 
1915-16; head mathematics department, Bloomington (Illinois) High School, 
1917-18; superintendent of schools, Wyoming, Illinois, 1919; instructor 
in commerce and administration, University of Chicago, 1919-22 and 

(more ) 



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-2- 

1929-31; head department of commerce t Robert College, Constantinople, 
Turkey, 1922-23; assistant professor of economics, University of Arizona 
1923-24; head, division of accounting: and management, Oregon State 
Agricultural College, 1924-25; professor of management and accounting, 
University of Texas, 1925-45; president, Southern Illinois University 
since 1945. Served in U.S.N.R., 1918. Certified public accountant, 
state of Texas, 1929. Member of advisory council, Illinois Department 
of Public Health; member, Governor's Commission on Education; member, 
Crab Orchard Lake Commission. Member, American Economic association, 
American Accounting association, American Association of University 
Professors, National Education Association, Rotary International, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, Betta Gsmma Sip-ma, Sigma Delta Pi, Sigma Iota Ersilon. 

Merwin, Bruce Welch, educator; born lola, Kan., Feb. 27, 13$9; 
son, Charles Ldwin and Lydia Ella (Welch) Merwin; bachelor of arts 
degree, University of Kansas, 1911, bachelor of science in education, 
1911, master of arts degree, 1924, doctor of philosophy decree, 1929; 
married Helen Hinkle, 1914 (decea.sea 1939); one daughter, Helen 
Elizabeth; married Blanche Cline, June 8, 1940. Teacher, Paris, Tenn., 
1911-12, and Jerome, Idaho, 1912-13; superintendent of schools, 
Savonburg, Kan., 1913-15; curator, University Museum, Philadelphia, 
1915-19; superintendent of schools, Republic, Kan., 1921-22; principal, 
county high school, Sharon Springs, Kan t , 1922-26; instructor in 
education, University of Kansas, 1926-27; instructor in education, 
Southern Illinois Normal University (now Southern Illinois University), 

i 1927-29, director of training schools 1929-44, acting president 1944. 

; Director and one of the founders of the Jackson County Teachers' Credit 

| Union and the Illinois State Archaeological Society; member, Illinois 
Education Association (second vice president; member of the tenure and 

, auditing committees; ex-president, Southern Division; also member of 
other committees); member National Association of Supervisors of Student 

(more) 



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-3- 

Teaching (member of research committee), American Association of School 
Administrators, Society of College Teachers of Education, national 
Education Association, Society for Advancement of Education, Illinois 
Schoolmasters Club, Illinois Elementary School Principals Association, 
Kappa Phi Kappa (president), Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Phi, Acacia, 
Republican. Methodist. Rotary International. Contributor of articles 
to magazines. Co-author; Illinois . Cross-Roads of a Nation, historical 
reader for elementary schools. Home: 601 W. Walnut St., Carbondale, 
Illinois . 

Cunningham, Floyd Franklin, geographer; born, Flat Rock, 111., 
Dec. 24, 1#99; son, Carl Homer and Lillie Alberta (Seitzin<?er ) Cunnin^ha 
student, Eastern Illinois State Normal School (now Eastern Illinois 
State College), Charleston, 1916-13; bachelor of education, Illinois 
State Normal University, Normal, 1926; student, University of Chicago, 
summer, 1927; master of arts, Clark University, 192$, doctor of 
philosophy, 1930; married Helen Blanche Espy, Sept. 1, 1925; children — 
Jo Ann, Floyd Espy. Teacher, rural schools, Crawford County, 111., 
1918-23; principal, Emerson School, Berwyn, 111., 192.5-27; head, 
department of geography, State Teachers College, Florence, Alabama, 
1929-1947 (Dr. Cunningham's appointment to the staff of Southern Illinoi 
University in the fall of 1947 as acting chairman- -now chairman--of 
the geography department occurred too late for inclusion in Wh o ' s Who ) ; 
visiting professor of geography, Peabody College for Teachers, 
Nashville, Tenn., summer, 1935; instructor in geo^ra^hy, Biarritz 
American University, Biarritz, France, 1945; U. S. Army lecture bureau, 
Frankfurt, Germany, lecturer in geography, Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt, 
Bremen, Wiesbaden, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Kassel, Giessen, Augsburg, all 
in Germany, and Salzburg and Vienna in Austria, 1947; representative of 

(more ) 



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the State of Alabama to the International Geography Congress, Warsaw, 
Poland, 1934; secretary, National Council of Geography Teachers, 1936- 
40; first vice president, 1941, president 1942-43-44; consultant, 
Educational Policies Commission; member Kappa Delta Pi, Gamma Theta 
Upsilon. Democrat. Kiwanis Club (president, Florence (Ala.) Club, 
1932; lieutenant governor of the first division of Alabama, 1941). 
Author; Laborato ry Manual in the Geography of North Amer ica, 1930; 
Laboratory Manual in the Geography of South America (with C. F. Jones), 
1932. Contributor of articles to the Journal of Geography and the 
Alabama School Journal » 

Hodge, John R., army officer; born, Golconda, 111., June 12, 1#93 ; 
son, John Hardin and Melissa Caroline (Steagall) Hodge; student, Souther 
Illinois Teachers College (now Southern Illinois University), 1912-13, 
University of Illinois, 1917; married Lydia Gillespie Parsons, Oct. 6, 
1917; children--Barbara Anne. Commissioned second lieutenant in 1917 
and advanced through the grades to lieutenant ereneral (temporary) , 
1945; permanent brigadier general, March, 1946; served in France, 
191&-19, Pacific Theatre since 1942; attended Army Infantry School, 
Chemical Warfare School Command and General Staff School, Army War 
College, Air Corps Tactical School. On War Department General Staff, 
1936-41; commander, 24th Corps from activation, April, 1944. Commander, 
U. S. Army Forces in Korea since landing in September, 1945. Member 
Triangle (Engineering), Scarab (architectural), Sigma Tau, Tau Beta Pi. 
Home: 808 S. Illinois Avenue, Carbondale, 111. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HEM»B««MBMHBai^HH«HnH 



5-7-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - Here's something new under the sun I 

Southern Illinoisans are used to music students being presented in 
recitals to show what they can do, but Southern Illinois University 
next Monday will present a ''recital" by students in the speech 
department . 

Reminiscent of the programs presented by "teachers of elocution" 
half a century ago, this University speech program will be minus the 
trappings of stagy gestures and artificial accents of by-gone years. 
Instead, the collegians will demonstrate that they are being taught 
to use modern eloquence — simple , unaffected, to the point. 

One feature of the program will be a demonstration of choric 
reading by a choir of 30 voices. This group will present "Caliban in 
the Coal Mines" by' Louis Untermeyer, "The Congo" by Vachel Lindsay and 
"Coffee with Meal" by Ogden Nash. 

Three numbers of poetry reading will be given by Ralph Lane of 
Eldorado, reacting "Intimations of Immortality'' by William Wordsworth, 
and by Leone McClerren of Thompsonville , Jerome Seltzer of Altamont and 
Joseph Rezetka of Benton, reading "The Death of the Hired Man" by 
Robert Frost . 

A prose section will include narrative prose, Thomas Wolfe's 
"What Is Man?", presented by Robert Veach of Herrin; a narrative play, 
Sinclair Lewis's "The Good Spbrt" by w Barbara Harrison of Sparta, Dale 
Kittle of Wayne City, and George Seifert of DuQuoin; and comedy reading, 
Dorothy Parker's ^fhe Waltz-," by Charlotte Waggoner of Herrin. 

The speech recital will be given Monday evening at 3 p. m. in the 
Little Theatre on the University campus, and will be open "to the public 
without charge.. 

During the period May. 16-27 a series of individual student recital 
will be given, 

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.. .) 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ^M^^^^HU^^nnB 



5-10-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois is a territory where 
a wide range of crops can be profitably grown, and as soon as "we learn 
to feed our plants as well as our animals, we will take care of our own 
prosperity, 1 ' declares Dr. Lowell R. Tucker, Southern Illinois University 
agriculturist . 

Dr. Tucker asserted that Southern Illinoisans "are as able to help 
ourselves as those of any other regions," while admitting that Southern 
Illinois "happens to be a land or territory where the people need to 
help themselves sooner than in some of the more recently settled, level, 
rich territories." 

While not disapproving of the surveys being made by various agencie' 
and associations to "help the poor people of 'Little Egypt,'" Dr. Tucker 
proposes that Southern Illinois take a look at its resources and see 
what the area itself can do to improve its lot. 

"Regardless of industry, business, or any other factor," he assertec 
"the first item of success in any territory is eventually related to 
the productivity of the land. 

"Animals must depend on plant growth, humans must depend on both 
plant and animal growth for their food supply. Therefore, conditions 
for plant growth are the first and most important essentials for a 
territor}/- to be prosperous.'' 

In Southern Illinois, '.he feels, the favorable conditions for growing 
economic plants outweigh the unfavorable ones, if these conditions are 

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recognized end dealt with.. 

One unfavorable factor is that plant growth in Southern Illinois 
is uneven, he said. 

It is literally true that in some parts of Southern Illinois, "the 
grass is definitely greener than it is just over the fence on some other 
farms," he pointed out. 

"Often one reason is because there is more grass,'' he explained. 
"The farms depend on rainfall for their water supply, and the rein falls 
on the just and the unjust alike. The weatherman brings the weather to 
all alike, except that the hilltops tend to have some frost protection 
that the valleys do not have, and the river bottoms get floods that the 
higher ground does not receive.'' 

The same irregularity in yield holds true for other crons, he added. 

Another reason for the irregularity in production is the fact that 
one farmer practices sound farm management— including proner feeding for 
his plant s--while his neighbor does not, Dr. Tucker said. 

"This territory has been farmed longer than most territories of 
the state, and the native plant food supply is running short," he 
explained. 

"It is generally recognized that if you are to grow an animal, 
you will have to feed it. This is not so thoroughly recognized where 
plants are concerned." 

Southern Illinois has the sunshine, heat and water supnly available 
each year — all favorable factors, he pointed out. These ingredients 
for a good crop are supplied and distributed free and evenly over the 
land. 

"Minerals needed by plants and organic matter, however, are in the 

shortest suprly of any item on many farms—unless they are added by 

the farmer," he declared. 

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■'Production in this region can therefore be increased many fold by- 
feeding the plants the needed minerals and adding organic matter," he 
asserted. 

The University agriculturist, who is ecting chairman of the 
agriculture department, also pointed out that agriculture isn't the 
concern of the farmer alone — consumers as well as farmers have a stake 
in agriculture, and agriculture properly conducted can stimulate 
prosperity for commerce and industry. 

"The community helps any business including agriculture in a number 
of ways besides the very important item of furnishing a demand for the 
good," Dr. Tucker explained. "The feeding of plants requires fertilizer, 
which the farmer must buy with money. Here is an opportunity to loan 
money wisely and profitably. 

"It requires the procurement, transfer and distribution of the 
fertilizer—more big industry. This often includes such things as 
construction and use of trucks, commercial spreaders, and so on. 

"More industry is necessary in handling the crops produced," 

Southern Illinois is a territory where a wide range of crops can be 
profitably grown, Dr. Tucker insisted. 

"The greatest improvement that can be made in this territory is 
to arrange for the proper distribution and intelligent use of lime, 
phosphate, potash, and nitrogenous fertilizers in the places where 
they are most needed. 

"Let us in our towns consider further the commerce that our country 
people need so that all will prosper more, 

"The commerce needed most includes fertilizers to increase the 
crops, processing to change perishable to much more staple products, 
and improved commerce of marketing. 

"The rural areas have a wide range of skills for growing crons. 
Local help is needed in these other lines, and it is the opportunity and 
duty of the communities to supply it." 

With self-help, Southern Illinois is capable of developing its 
diversified land of plenty and beauty into a "Garden of Eden" yielding 
an abundance of fruits, vegetables, flowers, cereals, milk, eggs and 
meats, Dr. Tucker is convinced. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 












CORRECTION 


5-10-48 





Carbondale, 111., May - The Information Service at Southern 
Illinois University today called attention to the fact that Dr. 
Dorothy DavieS:,. associate professor of physical education for women, 
has been promoted to a full professorship, not an assistant 
professorship, as a University news release recently stated. 

Dr. Davies is chairman of the department of nhysical education 
for women. Her promotion will take effect next September. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■i 



5-10-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - The faculty of Southern Illinois 
University has elected several new faculty representatives to the 
Advisory Council to the President, to serve next year. 

Mrs. Bonnie Lockwood, instructor in commerce, University High 
School, has been elected secretary of the faculty for next year, 
succeeding Miss Frances Barbour, associate professor of English, and 
in that capacity will serve on the Advisory Council. 

Van A. Buboltz, assistant professor of business administration, 
was elected to the council as a representative of the College of 
Vocations and Professions, to succeed Miss Lucy K. Woody, professor of 
home economics. 

Three members-at-large were elected, Dr. Robert D. Faner, associate 
professor of English, to succeed Miss Vera Peacock, professor of foreign 
languages, for a three-year term; Dr. V/. C. McDaniel, associate 
professor of mathematics, and Miss Opal Stone, assistant professor and 
librarian. Dr. McDaniel and Miss Stone are to fill new positions on 
the council, which is bein^ enlarged for next year. 

The Advisory Council, established two years ago, has been composed 
of seven elected faculty members and seven members, usually administrate: 
appointed by the President. Next year, the council will have nine 
elected and nine appointed members. 



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y ■' — » 







Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ■DUKHBH^HMBBmMHHHKHHMBaBI 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-10-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University athletic 
teams were active on all fronts over the weekend of May 7 and #, winning 
four contests while losing only two. 

Leland P. "Doc" Lingle's undefeated track team swept to its sixth 
dual victory over Cape Girardeau, 92 to 34. 

Two new Southern records were established. Crpt. George Beltz of 
Marion nipped his own record in the ##0, turning in the distance in 
2:01.6 to exceed the old record of 2:01.7 held jointly by Beltz and 
Brake and set in 1947. 

Joe McLafferty of Carbondale turned in a sterling 10:14.4 two-mile, 
clipping three seconds off the record which Aiken set in 1931. 

Southern's baseball team split, winning an Illinois Intercollegiate 
athletic Conference °:ame from Normal, 4 to 2, and losing to Shurtleff, 
11 to 4. 

Southpaw Marion Moake of Marion bested Normal's ace hurler, Rzadski 
for the second consecutive time. The Maroons won by virtue of a two-run 
rally in the 10th inning. Moake limited the Redbirds to five hits, two 
more than Rzadski gave up in losing to Southern. 

Coach Bill Freeburg's steadily improving tennis team won twice, 
white-washing Cape Girardeau Friday, 9 to 0, and topping a e-ood Princini.- 
team here Saturday, 5 to' 2. These victories brought the season's won- 
lost record to 5-2. 

The Maroon golf team continued on the defeat trail, losing to 
Shurtleff Saturday, 12 to 6,. and to Cane Girardeau $| to 5i. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■mHHHHNBHnHHHBUHHHnHaB 

* 



5-10-48 
Carbondale, 111., May - Twenty-four Southern Illinois university 
co-eds have been nominated for "Miss Southern," to be presented at a 
masquerade ball climaxing the second annual Spring Carnival, May 20-22. 

The ball will take place on Saturday evening, after a three-day 
round of festivities, including a parade, a street dance, a track 
meet, a Little Theatre play, and a vaudeville show. 

The "Miss Southern" nominees include: Nada Kauzlarich of Christophi 
Doris Wade of Vandalia, Doris Petie of Carbondale, Mary Lou Hood of 
Metropolis, Betty Wilson of Palestine, Donna McCandlish of Lawrenceville 
Ann Fleming of Johnston City , Rosie Knight of Rio Hondo, Texas, Kathryn 
Middleton of Rosemond, Jane Casteel of Hurst, Bernice Cochran of 
Murphysboro, Lyn Wandling of Litchfield, Betty Bain of Carbondale, 
Marie Dornbach of Belleville, DeLores Williams of Collinsville, Jane 
Harper of Anna, Lorraine Wallace of Cobden, Pat Tope of Murphysboro, 
Helen Perryman of Carbondale, Jeannie Hauner of Murphysboro, June 
Cannon of Marion, Kay Fletcher of Johnston City, Shirley Ryan of Benton, 
and Alice Krieshok of Madison. 



-V.V 



_^__^_____ Southern Illinois 

nun—— _•_— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■■^■■■■■■■■fHBinHBBHHaHBHHB tu 

^^^ * 



5-12-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - The president of Pern: Mutual Life 
Insurance Company will deliver the comraencement address at Southern 
Illinois University to the 194B graduating class, University President 
Chester F., Lay has announced. 

Dr. John A. Stevenson, a 1905 graduate of Southern who is now 
president of one of the nation's largest insurance concerns, will address 
the graduates at the commencement exercises Friday, June 11, at 9:30 
a. m., in Shryock Auditorium. 

Dr. Stevenson, a native of Cobden, 111., graduated from the two-year 
program at Southern in 190$; obtained a bachelor of arts desrree from 
Lwing College in Illinois in 1908, the master of arts ce'gree from the 
University of Wisconsin in 1912, and the doctor of philosophy decree 
from the University of Illinois in 191$'. He also holds the honorary 
doctoral degree L.H.D. from the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Penna., conferred in 1943. 

He served as assistant principal of the Nashville and Olney high 
schools and also as superintendent at Olney, later lecturing in educatioi 
at the University of Wisconsin. For several years he was manager of 
the music, drawing and manual arts ; department for a Chicago publishing 
house . 

From 1916 to 1918 he was lecturer in education and secretary of the 
appointments committee, department of education, at the University of 

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12- 

Illinois, end the following year he served as assistant professor of 
secondary education and director of the summer session. He spen^ 1919-2C 
as professor of education and director of the School of Life Insurance 
Salesmanship at Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Leaving the educational .field for private business, Dr. Stevenson 
became a vice president of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the 
United States in 1920, leaving that group in 192S to manage the John 
A. Stevenson Agency of Penn Mutual Ljfe Insurance Company, 

He became a vice president, executive vice president and trustee, 
successively, in the Penn Mutual Comnany, and has served as the company 1 e 
president since 1939. 

Dr. Stevenson has been active in state and national insurance associa- 
tions, Philadelphia, New York and U.S. chamber of commerce work, YMCA, 
war service activities, inter-American affairs, and civic enterprises. 

Durine the war years he was active in Naval affairs, serving as a 
member of the executive committee of the Naval Training Association, 
as director and national vice president of the Navy League of the United 
States and as a member of the Navy Manpower Survey Board. In 1944 he 
received the Navy's Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the same 
year received the Philadelphia Medal of Merit. 

Even after leaving the education profession, Dr. Stevenson has 
maintained his interest in this field. He has served as a trustee of the 
University of Pennsylvania, Berea College, Temple University and the 
University of Chicago, and from 193$ to 1944 was president of Friends 
of the University of Pennsylvania Library. He is also a. member of the 
Babson Institute corporation and of the advisory board for Admiral 
Farragut Academy. 

(more ) 



He has served as a director of the Southern Illinois University 
Foundation and as member of the board of directors of the Southern 
Alumni Association. 

Dr. Stevenson is the author of several books, including The Pro.iect 
Method of Teaching , 1921; Meet in? Objections t 1921; Selling Life 
Insurance , 1922; Farm Projects , co-author with Carl Colvin, 1922; 
Constructive Salesmanship , 1923 ; Problems and Projects in Salesmanship 
1923; Education and Philanthropy , 1927t He is also co-editor of Harper 
hf-fe Insurance Library. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



[Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. l^nMM^H^^^HHM^^M^MWa 



5-12-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Mrs. Mar.jorie Lyons, director of rhysical 
education for women at Rinori College, Ripon, Vise., has been appointed 
to the summer faculty of Southern Illinois University, University 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Mrs. Lyons, who holds the bachelor' s d egree from Oberlin College 
and the master's degree from the University of Wisconsin, will serve 
as instructor in the Southern department of physical education for 
women during the summer session June 14- August 8. 

Tffrtr 



Carbondale, 111., May - Norma! Henderson of Carbondale, a senior 
at Southern Illinois University, has been awarded one of five graduate 
fellowships in art for next year at Louisiana. State University, according 
to Ben Wat kins, actin? chairman of the art department. 

Miss Henderson, who is especially interested in design, has exhibited 
in student art shows and in exhibits of the Southern Illinois Art 
Association at Cairo and West Frankfort. She is president of Kappa 
Pi, art fraternity. 

ifirtf 



-u* 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-12-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University has become 
a member of the National Safety Council, University President Chester 
F. Lay has announced. 

One of six higher educational institutions in Illinois to offer 
courses in safety education and driver education , Southern has conducted 
several short courses for high school teachers, is now conducting an 
extension course in safety education at Mound Citv, with an enrollment 
of 55j is giving a first aid course for University students this term, 
and is conducting a. driver education course for University high school 
students, with 23 enrolled. 

Southern's safety education work is taught by Frank Bridges, 
instructor, who last summer completed a special seminar course in driver 
education and training for college professors, conducted jointly by 
the University of Illinois and the American Automobile Association, 

The National Safety Council is composed of several hundred insurance 
companies, automotive companies, educational institutions and other 
agencies interested in promoting safety. 

m 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHHUHHaHBHMBHBaMMaMHMK 



5-12-48 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May -Southern Illinois University 1 s undefeate> 
track team is risking its undefeated record when it faces the Bears of 
Washington University Saturday, May 15, at St. Louis. The Maroons will 
also visit Washington in tennis and golf, but the major interest is in 
the meeting of two undefeated track teams. 

Leland P. "Doc" Lingle, Southern's gloomy track mentor, expects thi: 
meet to be the closest yet this season, but feels the Maroons have a 
good chance to pull through to a victory. 

Bill Freeburg's tennis team, which is now on a two-meet winning 
streak, is expected to play a close match with the Bears. 

The Maroon golf team will try once again to regain the winning 
road. Coach Lynn C. Holder's charges lost all but one meet, but in each 
defeat they have very narrowly missed victory, 

ffffff 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May -Owning a two-two record in the Illinois 

Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, the Southern Illinois University 

baseball Maroons will visit DeKalb Friday and Saturday, May 14 and 15, 

to play a crucial two-game series against the Huskies of Northern Illinoi 

State Teachers College. * 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin- of the Maroons expects to start two 
southpaws against the Huskies, Marion Moake of Marion and Leon Sitter of 
Cobden. We.lt Frazer of Pinckneyville will probably be behind the bat. 



7f 



m 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ■HHMBaattHHBUiHHNHH 



j 



5-13 -43 

Carbondale, 111., May - a nationally known-educator, who is an 
ordained Baptist minister, will deliver the baccalaureate sermon to 
Southern Illinois University's 194$ graduating class, according- to 
University President Chester F, Lay, 

Dr. Homer P. Rainey, now president of Stephens College, Columbia 
Mo., will address the graduates at the baccalaureate service at 5:30 
P . M. Sunday, June 6, in Shryock Auditorium. 

Dr. Rainey is former president of Franklin College in Indiana, of 
Bucknell University in Pennsylvania,, and of the University of Texas, 
and is former executive director of the American Youth Commission. 
He became president of Stephens College in June, 1947. 

He holds the bachelor of arts degree from Austin Collesre, the master 
of arts and the doctor of philosophy decrees from the University of 
Chicago. Honorary doctoral degrees have been conferred on him by Austin 
College, Denison University and Washington and Jefferson College, 

Before accepting his first college presidency in 1927, he taught 
at Austin College and at the University of Oregon. 

He is the author of a number of books and other publications, 
including Public School Finance , 1929; How Fare American Youth , 1937; 
A Study of School Finance -in Oregon , 1925; The Distribution of School 
Funds in Oregon , 1926; The Achievement of Elementary School Punils in 
Oregon , 1927. 

m 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Release Friday 5-13-48 

Carbondale, 111., May 14 - A group of journalism students from 

Southern Illinois University this afternoon is visiting the newspaper 

plant of the Vandalia Leader and the State Penal Farm, 

Accompanied by Robert A. Steffes, acting chairman of the journalism 

department, the group is composed of Don Grubb of Vergennes, Lawrence 

Coates of Last St. Louis, Bill Plater of Vienna, Fred Senters of Flora, 

Robert Malone of Carbondtle, Fred Fritzinger of Anna, and George 

Uenison of Carbondale. 

The group made the trip at the invitation of Charles W. Milles, editoi 

of the Vandalia Leader , who is president of the Illinois Press Associatic 

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Carbondale, 111., May - Mrs, George C, Camp has been appointed a 
temporary faculty assistant in the Allyn Training School at Southern 
Illinois University, University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Mrs. Camp will take over the work of Miss Mary Entsminger, associate 
professor, who is on leave of absence because of illness. 

The new appointee holds the bachelor's degree from Ohio State 
University and has taught in several elementary schools. 

frffff 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■HHHBn 



5-13-43 

Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May - John Catlin, Southern Illinois University 
senior from Harrisburg, was elected to the National Board of Senior 
Student Managers of Intramural Activities at the First National Student 
Sport Conference held at the University of Illinois May 7 and 8. 

Catlin is one of the nine college and university students in the 
country to serve on this board, which has as its purpose the building 
of better intramural athletic programs, 

In colleges and universities, students shoulder the responsibility 
for planning and executing intramural activities while faculty membefs 
.serve-' only in advisory capacities* 









, 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-14-43 

Cerbondale, 111., May - The popular conception of the drawing 
power of a q'ood athletic team may have been blasted here at Southern 
Illinois University as the result of a poll conducted by two graduate 
sociology students. 

So was the "country club ? ' reputation of college life. 

These two students - William D. Hatley of Carbondale and Frances 
R. Paule of Belleville - conducted a scientific poll of a representative 
sample of the freshmen class a 

Out of the 200 first year students queried, only 1 per cent said 
they c ame to Southern because of the University* s well known basket 
ball t earn '. 

(Southern has won its third consecutive Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference title in basket ball, in 1946 won the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Basketball championship at the Kansas 
City Tournament, has represented the State of Illinois at Kansas City 
three out of the last four. years, and last year went to Kansas City as 
the defending champions.) 

Another 1 per cent said they came to ioin a fraternity or sorority '. 

Eleven per cent of the freshmen polled said they c ame to Southern 
because of the school's "higher rating amor,'?- the country's colleges." 

The freshmen polled by Hatley and Paule were asked to indicate 
the two major reasons they came to Southern c 

9y far the largest group--$0 per cent--ssid they chose Southern 

because it is "close to home," and 62 per cent r ave as one of their 

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major reasons the fact that Southern is "not so expensive. 1 " 

Their other reasons included: influence of friends, 24 per cent; 
scholarship, good only at Southern, 9 per cent; people at Southern "are 
good common Folks", 7 per cent. 

Nearly 90 per cent of the freshmen polled, are attending college 
primarily to prepare themselves for a vocation, according to the survey. 

The pollsters found that 57 per cent are preparing for some vocation 
other than teaching, while 31 P ( 3P cent are preparing: for the teaching 
profession. 

The students Questioned were asked to check the three most important 
reasons or factors influencing their decisions to ^o to college. Their 
answers, in percentages, follow: 

Preparation for vocation other than teaching, 57 per cent; narents 
wanted you to go to college, 39 per cent; to earn more money, 36 per 
cent; for the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, 34 per cent; to 
prepare yourself for the teaching profession, 31 per cent; increase your 
range of vocational choice, 27 per cent; to If am to appreciate life 
more fully, 23 per cent; to find out for what you are qualified, 14 
per cent; to improve your social standing, 13 per cent; attractions of 
the G.I. Bill of Rights, 25 per cent (answered only by veterans); you 
had nothing better to do, 5 per cent; to enter into sports, 4 per cent; 
for the social life, 3 per cent; your boyfriend or girlfriend went to 
college, 3 per cent; to find a desirable mate, 2 per cent. 

The survey was conducted as part of Hatley T s and Paule's work in a 
sociology research course conducted by Dr. Joseph K. Johnson. 

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/ 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED, MMBMKHHHMHHHHBNBBHHHH 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-14-4& 

Carbondale, 111., May - The Twenty-Ninth Annual Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Track and Field Meet will be held 
at McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale, May 22* 

Defending champion Northern Illinois Slate Teachers College of DeKal' 
is favored to win the meet, which will have trial heats Saturday morning 
before the finals beginning at 1:30 p.m. Donesters are giving Southern 
Illinois University the nod for second place on the be sis of decisive 
victories over the other teams, Western Illinois State College, Illinois 
State formal University, and Eastern Illinois State College. 

If any team is capable of dethroning the potent Northern Huskies, 
it will be the Southern Maroons of Coach Leland P. :T Doc" Lin.^le. On 
the basis of previous performances, Northern should be £Ood for at least 
five firsts, with Southern and Western following with three. Southern 
gets the nod over Western by virtue of an overwhelming dual meet win. 

Outstanding events should be the 120-yard high hurdles and the 
$$8-yard run. 

Three men, Southern's Joe Hughes from West Frankfort, Normal's ^eyer 
and Northern's E, Smith are matched with identical times, 15»$s, in the 
high hurdles. 

Five closelv matched men have been entered for the 880 with only two 
seconds covering the soan of their best times this year. James of 
Western, Spiller of Eastern, Jones of Normal, Drynan of Northern, and 
Southern's Capt. George Beltz of Marion have each run the distance in 
less than 2:02s. (more) 



' 



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The record most likely to be broken is the discus mark. Southern's 
Quentin Stinson, the great athlete from Eldorado, has exceeded the old 
mark several times with his best toss ^oine 145' 7". 

Another sure winner is Lloyd La Rose of Last era, who smears to be 
a walk in in the shot-put with a previous effort of 47 T 11" • 

In the mile, Goodwin of Northern has the best time, 4:34s, but he 
will find competition from Southern's Joe McLafferty of Carbondale, who 
has been just a second or t wo off that pace all year. Normal's Osborne, 
with a 4.40s race to his credit, will provide ru?" r ed competition for 
Goodwin and McLafferty, 

Ronnie Jackson, Western's speed merchant, is the class of both 
sprints, with a 10-flat 100 and a 21,6s 220 to his credit. He will have 
able challengers in both events, with Northern's Bender and Southern's 
Joe Budde of Belleville both capable of pullins an upset. 

Northern appears set to walk away with the pole vault and hig-h 
jump. Hunsberger and Greinke have vaulted 12' 7 i! } s. half a foot better 
than their nearest competition, and Marston's 6' 4 !i jump is well ahead 
of the field. 

The I. I. A, C. track meet, however, will not be the only activity 
on the Southern c ampus, Saturday, May 21. Southern's Second Annual 
Spring Carnival, a three day celebration, will feature a carnival 
midway at the same time as the track meet, and visitors are assured of 
varied other entertainment. 

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I Southern Illinois 

:^—— li nn »!■ ■——■— 

!■— -^— —————— i^—^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^—^^^^^^^j—^^^^^^^— 



5-14-48 

Carbondale, 111., May 14 - Southern Illinois University President 
Chester F« Lay and Dr. Orville Alexander, director of Alumni Services, 
are in Champaign tonight to attend the annual banquet of Southern 
alumni in the Champaign area. 

Dr. Alexander said that he understood more than 75 persons had made 
reservations for the dinner meeting at the Downtown Club, 

This is the fourth alumni, club to hold meetings this spring, 
Larlier meetings have been held at Chics ?ro, at Metropolis and in Hawaii, 
Honolulu, Alexander said. 

The annual banquet of the entire Alumni Association will be held 
on the Southern c ampus Thursday evening, June 10, at 6:30 p. m., the 
night before the University's 194$ commencement exercises. 



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Carbondale, 111., May - Raymond H. Dey, director of The Extension 
Service at Southern Illinois University, is attending the meeting of 
the Teachers College Extension Association in V/e.rrensburg, Mo., May 
13-15. 



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\ mma ^ mmmm ^^ mmmmmi ^^ m ^^ B ^^ mm Southern Illinois 
«"™™^ — ■— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. imh—mih ■■— ■■■■■■i i ■ ■ 



II 



Attention: Sports Lditors 5-17-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., May - nn underdog role is resting heavily on 
the Southern Illinois University track team, inspiring the charges of 
Coach Leland P. "Doc 51 Lingle to enthusiastic drilling in the hope of 
upsetting Northern Illinois State Teachers College in the Twenty-Ninth 
Annual Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Track and Fidld 
Meet here Saturday, May 22. 

Although Northern appears to have a better grip on probable first 
place victories, Southern, which is undefeated in dual competition this 
spring, may be able to pick up enough second and third place points to 
provide an upset. 

The Maroons have two decisive victories over Southeast Missouri 
State College (Cape Girardeau) , the team which won the Missouri 
Intercollegiate crown last Saturday. Southern defeated Cape 96 l/3 to 
34 2/3 and 92 to 34. 

Two records are in perii of being broken by men who have already 
exceeded the old marks. Southern's Cjientin Stinson of Eldorado will 
attempt to erase the former discus record and Lloyd LaRose of Eastern 
will strive for a new shot put record. 

The mile should he a thrilling race with two closely matched 
competitors, Goodwin of Northern and Southern's Joe McLafferty of 
Carbondale, ready to race for a time which could easily be below i+'30s» 

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Southern Illinois 



■!■— i^^^— —■— ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^■HH^M^H^Bi^BH^^^^nH 

■ M m — ■ rnrriiriMn-nwiMwinHiiir-nH^iiiii mill iwiiiiiiiiiwiiibiwhii— in 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-17-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Torrential rains dampened the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons over the weekend, raining out all contests 
except the baseball game against Northern Illinois State Teachers 
College at DeKalb Saturday. Southern lost, 14 to 4. 

The track, tennis, and golf teams, who were scheduled to face 
Washington University at St. Louis, each had to postpone their contests. 

Northern's heavy-hittin club blasted Southern's star southpaw 
Marion Moake of Marion to the showers in the first inning, and never 
dropped the lead. 

The Maroons will play host to Shurtleff Wednesday, May 19, at 
Southern's Chautauqua Street diamond, at 3 :00 p.m. The Maroons will be 
eager to redeem themselves after losing 11 to 4 to the same team earlier 
in the season. 

On Friday Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's baseball team will entertain 
the defending champions of the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic 
Conference and the current league leaders, eastern Illinois State College 
This ame will be the Maroon's final I.I.A.C. home game, although 
non-conference ;ames are on deck with Evansville and Louisiana Tech. 



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^^ M _ M _ iBiiiiBB _ iiiHHiiH ^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
— -^~" ■—■— -■— ■— ■- University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ■■ ■■■imhiumbm mm „„i„ , , 



II 



5-17-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - Kick-off for the second annual Spring 
Carnival at Southern Illinois University will be the Little Theatre 
Production, "Mr. Pirn Passes By, 1 ' on Thursday ni^,ht 3 May 20, in Shryock 
Auditorium, 

The gentle comedy by A a. Milne tells the story of a landed 
_,entry English family whose lives are changed by their passing contact 
with the elderly, absent-minded gentleman, Mr. Pirn. 

Directed by Dr. Archibald McLeod, associate professor of speech, 
the production will feature sets designed by Dr. McLeod and executed 
by a University stagecraft class. 

The cast includes: Charles Weber of Cairo as '"'George Marden," the 
staid Englishman; Jackie Reid of Du uoin as "Olivia, ,; his wife; Peggy 
Coleman of Marion as "Dinah,." George's ward; James Patterson of Mt. 
Vernon as "Brian, !i Dinah's fiance; Dorothy Coleman of Carbondale as 
"Anne," the maid; June Fulkerson of Carbondale as "Lady Harden," 

The role of Mr. Pirn is played by Lewis Hammack of Sparta* 

"Mr* Pirn Passes By" was first presented in this country by the 

Theatre Guild in 1927, a production which brought that organization to 

national fame, 

Sprin_, Carnival will proceed through Friday and Saturday, h 
vaudeville show is planned for Friday night, followed by a street dance 
on the campus parking lot, On Saturday afternoon the Carnival Midway 
will be in full swing, and the I.I.a.C. track meet will be run. The 
Carnival will close with a masquerade ball on Saturday ni_;ht at which a 
campus co-ed will be presented as "Miss Southern." 

All Southern alumni are invited to join in Spring Carnival, accordi 
to Robert Williams of Carmi, student chairman. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-17-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Miss Loretta Keough of Murphy sb or o, who 
will receive the bachelor's decree from Southern Illinois University in 
June, has been appointed assistant to the dean of women at the University 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Miss Keough, who will have the rank of faculty assistant, has 
worked as a student assistant in the dean of women's office for the past 
three years. 



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Carbondale, 111., May - Russell J. Elliott of Canton, who 
graduated from Southern Illinois University in the summer of 1947, with 
a major in history, has received a teaching fellowship for next year at 
New York University, according to Dr. Harold E. Briggs, chairman of the 
Southern history department. 

Elliott has been a graduate student at New York University during 
the current year, and expects to complete the master's degree in June. 
He will continue work toward the doctor of philosophy degree in U. S. 
history. 

"Elliott's scholastic record at N.Y.U. has been straight r A T ," 
Dr. Briggs said, "and the teaching fellowship grant was offered to him 
without his making application,'" 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-13-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - An "order" for fair weather has been 
filed with the weatherman for Thursday, Friday and Saturday by 2,500 
Southern Illinois University students. The occasion? Their second 
annual Spring Carnival # 

Outdoor activities are to be the order of the day, with a public 
judging of 25 "Miss Southern" candidates in front of the auditorium 
Friday afternoon at 2 p, m. J a Southern vs. Eastern baseball game 
Friday afternoon; golf, tennis and track conference meet Friday and 
Saturday; a street dance on Friday night; a parade Saturday morning; 
and the Carnival Midway Saturday afternoon. 

The campus will be ablaze with Maroon paper pennants, and the 
committee is holding its collective breath lest rain deluge the 
decorations. 

Other features of Spring Carnival include the Little Theatre play, 
'"Mr. Pirn Passes By i? on Thursday night at 8 p. m. , and a vaudeville 
show at 8 p. m. on Friday night, followed by a street dance. 

rrifit 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■HBBHHIMiMBHDflaHiBBBaBSHHai 



Carbondale, 111., May - An analysis of a recent study of higher 
education and democracy in this country, prepared by a special commissioi 
appointed by President Truman, was made by Dr. VJ. W. Parker, president 
of Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, here Monday night. 

addressing the Southern Illinois University chapter of the American 
Association of University Professors, President Parker termed the report 
a significant one. He agreed with many of the findings of the commissio] 
deploring (a) the inadequacy of social science study to prepare youth 
for democracy or for world understanding, (b) inadequacy of funds for 
education at all levels, and (c) the inability of colleges and universit: 
to provide a sound, well-rounded education for the large enrollments of 
today. 

Dr. Parker declared that the social sciences have not kept up with 
technology and the physical sciences, and expressed the opinion that 
students in both high school and colle ,e should be encouraged to 
understand and appreciate the advantages of democracy, ''without, of couri 
losing the objective point of view," he said. 

He pointed out that the nation 1 s liquor bill is almost twice as 
high as that for education, and that the country spends as much for 
cosmetics as it spends on education at all levels, from the kindergarten 
through the university. 

He reminded the audience that at the time of the last war, 4 per 

cent of the young people of college age in this country were attending 

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college, while in 1940 16 per cent of the college-age youth were in 
college. 

Today more than two million students are attending college, and the 
commission estimates that approximately 4,600,000 students should be 
in college by i960. 

This means larger and better facilities must be provided, Dr. Parke: 
declared, 

;.He urged that colleges and universities face squarely the fact 
that they c annot do as ;ood a job of educating young people with the 
large classes and overcrowded laboratories of today, rather than 
rationalizing about the somewhat questionable advantages of large classe- 

At the conclusion of President Parker's address, the AhUP chapter 
elected new officers for next year, as follows: Dr. J. Cary Davis.,. 
president, to succeed Prof. E., G. Lentz; Dr. W. C. r-IcDaniel as vice 
president; Miss Esther Shubert as secretary; and Dr. Robert C. Turner 
as treasurer. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ^^■^^nBK«^nmKM^^n»3RSiM 



5-18-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - Greek-letter social fraternities and 
sororities at Southern Illinois University will observe their second 
annual "Greek Week" May 23-2$. 

Jointly sponsored by Pan-Hellenic Council, composed of representati' 
of all sororities, and Inter-Fraternity Council, composed of fraternity 
representatives, Greek Week will open Sunday, May 23, with open-houses 
at all sorority chapter houses. 

On Tuesday, an inter-fraternity sing will be held on the steps of 
Shryock Auditorium, winners in the sorority and fraternity divisions 
winning a cup. 

A fraternity track meet—limited to non-varsity cindermen — will 
be held on Thursday. 

Closing Greek Week will be the Inter-Frat — Pan-Hellenic dance on 
Friday night, with music by hick Stuart and his orchestra. Presentation 
of awards to the most valuable fraternity boy and sorority girl and to 
the winning sorority and fraternity in the sing will be made at the dance 

frffff 

Carbondale, 111., i<iay - F. G. Warren, professor and chairman of 
the education department at Southern Illinois university, delivered 
the high school commencement address at Dongola May 18, and will deliver 
the commencement address to Shawnee tovm high school graduates May 30. 

JJ.M.1L 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-13-43 

Carbondale, 111., may - The annual Honors Day convocation will 
be held at Southern Illinois University Thursday morning, May 20, at 
10 a. m. in Shryock Auditorium, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Program for the convocation has been arranged jointly by the Studeni 
Council and the University committee on academic standards and honors, 
and will feature an address by Dr. Wm, B. Schneider, professor and 
chairman of the English department. 

Scores of students will be accorded recognition for academic 
scholarship and students who have received various scholarships, 
fellowships and other awards will be presented. 

Following the ceremony a reception will be held for parents of the 
honor students at Anthony Hall. 



Carbondale, 111., May - Dr. Bruce Merwin, professor of education 
at Southern Illinois University, has been asked to participate in a 
National Conference on the Pre-Service Education of Teachers to be held 
at Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, June 30- July 3» 

The conference has been c ailed by National Education association's 
Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards. Approximate.] 
400 educators and representatives of professions and industry will 
participate. 

Dr. Merwin will also attend the national meeting of the National 
Education association in Cleveland immediately following the conference. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ■■■HHM^^^BHHHnHHHKnSHH 



Attention; Sports Editors 5-l$-4$ 

Carbondale, 111,, l j lay - fin unusual attraction, a close two mile 
run, may be in store for Southern Illinois track fans Saturday, May 22, 
at the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Meet to be held at 
McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale. 

Joe McLafferty of Carbondale, Southern's ace freshman distance 
star, will compete with two crack two-milers from Northern Illinois 
State T e achers College in what should be an unusually exciting race, 

McLafferty recently nipped three seconds off the old Southern 
two-mile mark, running the distance in 10:14s, and has been steadily 
improving. He will find high caliber competition in Miller and Nelson 
of the Northern Huskies, with Miller having cracked ten minutes flat 
this spring. 

Northern is favored to win this running of the Twenty-Ninth I.I.a.C, 
meet, and Southern is expected to provide a major part of the competitio: 
with ia possible chance of winning in a upset. 

Eastern Illinois State College, Western Illinois State College, 
and Illinois State Normal University are expected to follow in order. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-1S-4S 

Carbondale, 111., May - Now showing in Southern's Little Gallery 
is an arresting exhibition of paintings tn, six students at Southern 
Illinois University. The show will run until June 1. 

For five of the painters, who are now exhibiting, the current show 
represents the culmination of four years' training as majors in art. 
Kinuye Jitodai of Seattle, Wash., James Nettleton of Jonesboro, Clarence 
Ball and Norma Henderson of Carbondale, and William Moss of Golconda are 
all seniors who expect to graduate in June or hu^ust. Jane Wallace of 
Marion is a sophomore. 

The five works of Moss are perhaps the most mature, accorain^ to 
Hiss Emily Farnham, associate professor of art. They reveal considerable 
technical facility, controlled complexity of composition anu color 
subtlety. "Ozc;rk Woman" is representative of these techniques. His 
four matted oils underscore his subtlety of color and ability to achieve 
a tonal unity. 

Miss Henderson's "Enchanted Place," the more successful of her two 

canvases, has discovered a successful idiom for personal expression. 

The"Jerry Anderson"by Ball is a traditional portrait easily 
understood by the layman. His three other works may be classified as 
surrealism, expressionism, and non-objectivism. 

The four paintings by Nettleton reveal this painter to be capable 
of sudden change from the dark-light contrast of "Seascape" and "Sudden 
Sunlight'' to the non-objectivity of "Atomic Aftermath". 

Miss Jitodai is exhibiting her surrealist "Sculpture by the Sea," 
a large landscape, "Mystery City", and a traditional figure painting 
called "The Orange Skirt." 

Miss Wallace is showing the unusual expressionist, ''The Omen of the 
Shell/' "Green Turban above Turquoise Eyes," a portrait, and a non- 
objective "The Spirit of Music." 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

■— ■■ — ■ — i — — ■ ■— ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. |^ aHHHH ^| H |^ HnB « MM 



5-19-43 

Carbondale, 111,, May -The first map ever made of the 
chromosomes of the yeast cell was ^resented by Dr. Carl L. Lindeeren, 
Southern Illinois University geneticist, at the recent meeting in 
Minneapolis of the Society of American Bacteriologists. 

Dr. Lindegren, director of Southern 1 s new biological science resesrc 
laboratory, displayed drawings of five of the six chromosomes found in 
the yeast cell. 

Explaining his paper in non-technical language, Dr. Lindegren 
pointed out that a chromosome is something like a r>iece of string, and 
that genes--the hereditary particles that transmit characteristics from 
one generation to the next--are places, shown as dots, alone; this string. 

His map of the five chromosomes actually looks something like a 
musical scale, with the dots for certain genes or hereditary characterist 
standing for the notes on the scale. 

Dr. Lindegren's paper before the bacteriological society dealt with 
the ability of the yeast cell to ferment sucrose( sugar ) , but he said 
he is unable to locate the dot on the chromosome scale which represents 
this hereditary characteristic. 

"You can only map the characteristics when they appear from 
generation to generation with Mendelian regularity- -that is, according 
to the Mendalian lav/ of inheritance," he explained. 

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"The trouble is, in our laboratory here at Southern, we have found 
that the sugar-fermentating gene doesn't behave properly. It doesn't 
occur in accordance with the Mendelian lav/. There is an inconsistency, 
and until we can arrive at a consistent pattern of recurrence, we can't 
map the characteristic*'.' 

On his chromosome map, the chromosomes are numbered from 1 to 5> and 
each chromosome is marked off in units—known as morgans --from one to 
30. The first gene or characteristic shown on the map is the palactose- 
fermentinpr ability, which he has located four units from the left end of 
Chromosome No. 1. The sex-determining factor he has located on 
Chromosome No. 3, 22 units from the left end. 

The trouble he is havins in reg^ing the location of the sucrose- 
fermenting ability on the chromosome is adding further convincing 
evidence to Dr. Lindegren's recently advanced theory that the eene is 
not as stable or invariable as geneticists have lonp- considered it. 

He has voiced the first dissent in some two or three decades from 
the commonly accented theory of the gene as a constant narticle, 
unchanged from generation to generation. 

The fact that he has been able to work out a "pedigree" for the 
sugar-fermenting characteristic of ^^east, but has not been able to nin 
it down to any regular pattern of behavior in hybrid yeasts adds 
substantiation to his new theory. 

m 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-19-4B 

Carbondale, 111., May - Roye Bryant, principal of Metropolis 
high school, has been appointed executive assistant in education and 
administration at Southern Illinois University, effective July 1, 
according to University President Chester F. Lay. 

"Mr. Bryant will inform the Presidents Office, the Extension and 
Placements Services, and the College of Education on services required 
of the University throughout Southern Illinois, and especially by the 
public schools of Illinois, 1 ' President Lay said. 

a graduate of Southern, Mr. Bryant holds the master's degree from 
the University of Illinois. 

He has taught in the grade schools of White County, served as 

principal of the nH erald high school, as superintendent of the grade 

school and principal of the high school at Omaha, and asrprincipal of the 

Enfield Community high school. He has served as superintendent and 

principal of the Metropolis Community high school and principal of the 

Dunbar high school at Metropolis since 1939. 

in 
Mr. Bryant is active/educational circles, serving on several 
committees of the Illinois Education association and of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. He belongs to Phi Beta 
Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi, scholarship societies, to the National Educatic 
Association, the Illinois Education Association, the Illinois Secondary 
School Principals' association and the Illinois association of School 
Administrators. 

He is currently serving as second vice president of Southern's 
Alumni Association and as a member of the Joint Alumni Council of the 
five higher educational institutions in the State Teachers College Systerr; 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^H^^HnH^ 



Release Thursday 5-19-48 

Carbondale, 111., May 20 - a baby-sitter service for one night only 
has been set up by the Spring Carnival committee at Southern Illinois 
University--to free student veterans and their wives so they can attend 
the masquerade ball on Saturday night. 

A corps of 15 high school girls have been recruited by Rod Kraatz 
of Ullin and his promotion committee, a sound truck advertising the 
" sitter service" toured through the Chautauqua Street veterans housing 
project to acquaint the prospective customers with the service. 

Spring Carnival, a three-day celebration, will open at Southern 
tonight with the presentation of the Little Theatre play, "Mr. Pirn Passe; 
By," at 8 p. m. in Shryock auditorium. 

Tomorrow, 23 campus beauties will parade before a group of impartial 
judges at 3 p. m. in a "Miss Southern" contest, open to the public. 
The judging will take place on the steps of the auditorium. The judges 
will select the five finalists, who will make their bow at the vaudeville 
show at 8 p. m. , also in Shryock Auditorium, 

Immediately following the vaudeville show, a street dance will be 
held in the parking area south of the Gymnasium. 

On Saturday at 12 noon, a parade of campus and civic organization 
floats will move through the downtown area, ending its march at the 
Carnival Midway on the campus. 

On Saturday night, a masquerade ball will close the carnival. 
Highlight of the ball will be the presentation of "Miss Southern^" chosen 
from among the top five ' contestants. 

The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference track, golf and 
tennis meets will be run at Southern simultaneously with Spring Carnival, 
and the baseball game between Southern and Eastern Illinois State College 
is scheduled for Friday afternoon. 

Robert Williams of Carmi is general student chairman of Spring 
Carnival, with Dr. Dorothy Davies and Leland P. ("Doc' 11 ) Lingle as faculty 
co-chairmen. 

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^ m — m ^- mm —— a ———^^^^^^- Southern Illinois 
— ■ -^— "-" — — — ■— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HM^Mn«UMM«HH0BMVK»*ffMH 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-19-48 

Carbondale, 111., Hay - The baseball Maroons of Southern Illinois 
University will face the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
champions, Eastern Illinois State Colle e, at 3:00 p.m., Friday, May 21, 
at Southern's Chautauqua Street diamond. 

Eastern is currently leaain^ the I. I. a. C. in the 1948 title 
race. Southern's record is two wins against three losses, placing 
them well down in the standings, but nothing would give them more joy 
than to knock the red-hot Panthers down in the standings. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin will probably start a southpaw, either 
Marion Moake of Marion, the Maroons leading hurler, or Leon Sitter of 
Cobden. 

S e cond baseman Bill Bleyer of Carbondale is currently leading 
Southern at the bat. The chunky, power-hitting keystoner is clipping 
the horsehide at a merry .405 clip. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MHMBHHHMMIHHHHHHHHBfiaMHHHE3H I. |f 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-19-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - William D. "Wilkie" Wilkinson, a June 

graduate of Southern Illinois University, has accepted a position as 

assistant coach of football and basketball at Sioux Falls College, 

South Dakota. 

Wilkinson, a physical education major who lettered in football at 

Southern, will take over his new duties next September. He will become 

head coach next ye^r, he has been informed. 



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Carbondale, 111., May - Two full days of tennis and golf are on 
dock for Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference teams Friday and 
Saturday, May 21 and 22, at the I. I. a, C. spring sports meeting here. 

The tennis matches will be held on the Southern Illinois University 
courts, starting at 3:00 a. m. Friday, and the golf rounds will start 
at the same time at the Du .uoin Country Club. 

The Southern Illinois University tennis team, coached by bill 
Freeburg, will be charged with the defense of the conference crown, and 
will attempt ~ to win this crown for the third consecutive year. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5-20-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - One hundred and forty-six students were 
given public recognition for scholastic superiority at the annual 
Honors Day Service at Southern Illinois University Thursday. 

Karl Plumlee of DuQuoin, graduating senior with the highest 
scholastic average for four years' work — 4.9 out of a possible 5.0 
points--received the annual Phi Beta Kappa prize awarded by the alumni 
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa composed of Southern faculty members* 

Mrs. Joan Fair bairn Terrell of H arvey and Dorothy Jean Sager of 
Paris, Tenn. , were recipients of awards from the American Association 
of Teachers of Spanish. 

The Betty Rhodes Memorial Prize awarded annually to an independent 
sophomore girl by Delta Sigma Epsilon sorority went to Beverly Ann 
Cochran of Metropolis. Mary Luth Whitman of Marion received the Janice 
Neckers Memorial Prize given annually to a freshman non- sorority girl by 
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. 

Announcement was made of the award to Louis R. Karraker of Jonesborc 
of the . l |?25 Charles Neely Prize given annually to a junior by the 
University Chapter of the Association of University Professors. 

Other students currently holding scholarships at Southern were 
given recognition, including: the Parent Teachers association 
Scholarship, Mildred Lorenz of Waterloo; the Rotary Scholarship for 
Latin-American Students, Luis Reyes Navarro of Mexico City, Mexico; 
the Murray Lvans Memorial Scholarship, Evan L, Hill of Marion. 

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Delta Delta Chi fraternity presented Robert Cagle of Metropolis 
with the Joe Dougherty Award, given annually to a non-fraternity man 
with a high scholarship average. 

Honor roll students from the freshman, sophomore, junior and senior 
classes were presented for recognition*. 

The Honors Day program was arranged jointly by the University 
committee on academic standards and honors, and the Student Council. 
a reception was held immediately after the ceremony for the honor 
students, their parents, fellow students and faculty members at Anthony 
Hall, 

Speaker for the occasion was Dr. William B. Schneider, professor 
and chairman of the English department, who designated Honors Day as a 
reminder that "our pre-eminent task is learning. i? 

He stressed the need in the uncertainty of today's postwar period 
for "an intelligent good will 51 that can combat the conquerors of men's 
liberty. 

i? The idea of good will is perhaps the only new idea that has hit 
the world in three or four thousand years," he declared. 

Graduating seniors who have maintained 4.25-point averages or above 
for four years of University work were awarded honor pins by the Student 
Council. Those receiving the pins were: Charles Barnard Ablett of 
Metropolis, Nina Crawford Aikman of Litchfield, Laura Belle Baker of 
Raleigh, Doris Jean Bantel of Murphysboro, Dorothy Rushing Bleyer of 
Carterville and Peggy Lou Browning of DeSoto, Missouri. Marlin Glenn 
Bunfill of Rushville, Robert R. Curtis of Carbondale, Mary Frederick 
Davis of Carbondale, Robert Files Etheridge of Fairfield, Veda Hallam 
Etheridge of Fairfield, and Helen Louise Francis of Nashville. 

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Juanita June Fulkerson of Carbondale, Elmer Gilley of Carbondale, 
Laurence E. Green of Patoka, Marian Gruber of Dowell, Betty Louise 
Hawkins of T: alnut Hill, Loretta Keough of Murphysboro, William N. 
Malinsky of Flora, Harry McMurray of DuQuoin, Frank B. Moake of Carbonda." 
and Mabel C. Paterson of Carbondale. 

Lloyd L. Patheal of Carbondale, Karl Plumlee of DuQuoin, Horton 
Presley of Carbondale, Nedra Reames of Hurst, George A. Russell of Geff, 
Doris Mae Sims of Murphysboro, Charles Gilbert Smith of Eldorado, Velma 
Ruth Smith of Crab Orchard, Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, Joan 
Fairbairn Terrell of Harveyy Norma Trotter of Cisne, Alice L. Vravick of 
West Frankfort, Clem George Wiedman of Effingham, and William Carl 
Wimberly of Granite City. 

Recognition was also _,iven to honor students in the other three 
classes as follows: 

Juniors with 4.25 averages or above-- Charles W. Allen of Carbondal< 
Betty Hagler Borella of Royalton, Francis Louis Borella of Orient, 
Kenneth Dwight Campbell of Sparta, and Mary Ruth Coffman of Norris City. 

Florence Claire Grim of Carbondale, Wallace Ray Deason of Hurst, 
Lucille Martha Dintelman of Nashville, Patricia FieldssEadie of West 
Frankfort, Warren Robert Eberhart of Blue Island, Nancy Schneider 
Gillespie of Carbondale, Charles Thomas Goss of Marion and Frank 
Freeman Groves of Carterville. 

Millie fent Casper Hankla of Anna, Louis R. Karraker of Jonesboro, 
Bruce E. Kirkman of Carterville, Charles W. Koch of Beckemeyer, Lee 
Ardell Kroener of Oakdale, Robert William Lickiss of Murphysboro, Robert 
E. Luetzow of Berwyn, Donald Manus of Anna, Paul Margelli of West 
Frankfort, and Rosemary Martin of Jonesboro. 

Martha McBrayer of Benton, Roy McCollom of Palmyra, Betty Lou 

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Mitchell of Carbondale, Margurine Pavloff of ^eigler, Fcaymond Peters of 

Balcom, Judson Phillips of Shawneetown, T 7illiam Prusaczyk of West 

Frankfort, Joseph Rezetka of West Frankfort, William Ridgway of Makanda, 

Ruth Elizabeth Sprankel, of Waterloo, and William Raymond Staudacher of 

Marion. 

Bobbie Dean Stone of Marion, Lawrence E. Stone of Marion, Walter 
Ellis Stone of West Frankfort, Frederick William Ulrich of Pinckneyville 
Joyce M. Wall of Mound City, Mary Roberta Wheeler of Carlinville, Jerrol 
Evans Williams of Salem, and Lynn Rory Woodward of Mound City. 

Sophomores with 4.5 averages or above — Joseph Howard Barnett of 
Equality, Frank John Bietto of Benld, Charles T "esley Blessin of Mt . 
Vernon, Glenn Otis Brown of Carbondale, Robert Kennon Cagle of Metropoli 
Beverly Ann Cochran of Metropolis, Weldon D. Billow of Dongola, David 
Elder of Cobden and William Hassell Etheridge of Fairfield. 

Vivian M. Ferrell of Eldorado, John Howard Frazier of Oblong, 
Jeanne Gorden of Vienna, Margaret Lois Halpain of Woodlawn, Dorothy 
Lou Helmer of DuC.uoin, Evan Louis Hill of Marion, Lloyd Edward Hubert 
of East St. Louis, c,nd George F. Jackson of Metropolis. 

Charles B. Koch of Beckemeyer, Mildred M. Lorenz of Waterloo, 
Kenneth Kirk Marshall of Marion, Betty June McHenry of Vienna, Richard 
Lee Newby of Danville, Joseph Niemann of Breeze, and Esther Pajak of 
Harvey. 

Donald Pretzsch of Crossville, Rose Price of Carbondale, Frederick 
Pundsack of Pinckneyville, Dorothy Rippelmeyer of Waterloo, Bernard 
Sandbert of Carbondale^ Martha Fay Sisk of DuQuoin, Edith Todd of Mt. 
Vernon, Fioy Keith Weshinskey of Marissa, and Ernest Yuhas of Harrisburg. 



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Freshmen with 4.5 averages or above-- Elizabeth Catherine alien of 
Bunker Hill, Beverly June Baine of Carbondale, Imogene Catherine 
Beckemeyer of Carlyle, Margaret Ann Black of Murphysboro, James Baynard 
Boulden of Carbondale and Barbara Ann Brummett of Litchfield, 

Darwin Darrell Davis of Salem, Esthel Blondell Farrar of Carrier 
Mills, Ruth Marie File of Salem, William H enry Fraley of Carbondale, 
Edward K. Knauel of Edwardsville, Raymond Lee Kuykendall of Steeleville, 
Phyllis Jean Lee of Salem, Doris Evelyn Lodge of Willisville, and 
Carroll Oliver Loomis of Cobden. 

Jeanne Ann Malone of Benton, Daniel W. McClerren of Thompsonville, 
James Lee Pflasterer of Belleville, Iris Guymon Sawyer of Carbondale, 
William H. Shackelford of West Frankfort, George L. Shafter of Texico, 
Joe L. Sims of Sparta, and Thomas 0. Sloan, Jr. of West Frankfort, 

Robert Gene .Stevens of Marion, Barbara Ellen Swartz of Carbondale, 
John C. Tibbets of Carbondale, William Edward Watkins of Centervilie 
Station, Kent Werner of Belleville, Elizabeth Ann Whiteside of West 
Frankfort, Mary Ruth Whitman of Marion, Joan Lee Williams of Carterville_. 
William Eugene Williams of Mulkeytown, Nancy Jean Willis of Murphysboro, 
and Leona Zukowski of Benton, 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■HHHMnB9KBBDHHHHHHBraHH 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-20-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., May - The outstanding Southern Illinois track 
and field meet of 194$ will begin at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, May 22, when 
the Twenty-Ninth Annual Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Meet goes into action at Mc Andrew Stadium in Carbondale. 

Five colleges and universities - Southern Illinois University, 
Illinois State Normal University, Western Illinois State College, 
Eastern Illinois State College, and Northern Illinois State Teachers 
College - will battle for the coveted I. I. h. C. crown. 

Northern, the defending champion, is favored to win again, with 
Southern getting second nod. Northern has better times in most events 
than the Maroons of Coach Leland P. ''Doc 1 ' Lingle, but good balance in 
the Southern squad, which will probably result in a number of second, 
third, and fourth place point winners, may make it possible for the 
Maroons to pull an upset. 

The track meet will be held at the same time as Southern T s Second 
Annual Spring Carnival Midway Show. Candidates for Miss Southern who 
is bein^ chosen in connection with the carnival, will appear at the trac! 
meet to make the presentation of medals to the winning competitors. 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HHHHKaMBMHHHHBBHBHHSHH! 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-20-4& 

Carbondale, 111,, May - With right-hander Don Ragsdale of DeSoto 
leading the way with a masterful four hit performance, the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons topped Shurtleff here Wednesday, 5 to 1. 

The Maroons leaped into the lead with one run in each of the first 
two innings and two in the third, giving Ragsdale a good working margin 
for his first win of the season, Shurtleff tallied in the seventh 
during Ragsdale ? s only streak of wildness, when they scored on two 
walks, a fielder's choice, and a scratch single. 

Second baseman Bill Bleyer of Carterville ranked with Ragsdale as 
the star of the game, getting a single and a double in four trips to 
the plate, and pivoting beautifully on two double plays. 

Not only was Ragsdale ' s pitching superb, but he started all three 
of Southern's double plays. 

Totals for the game: Southern; five runs, twelve hits, and two 
errors; Shurtleff; one run, four hits, and six errors. 

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Southern Illinois University Information Service 

Lorena Drummond, Editor 5-22-48 

Carbondale, 111., May - Installation of a Southern Illinois University 
chapter of Alpha i hi Omega, national men's service fraternity, will be held 
Sunday, May 23, at 5 p.m., with a national officer of the fraternity and an 
installation team from Southeast Missouri State Teachers College officiating. 

Alpha Fhi Omega is composed of college students who are former members of 
Eoy Scouts. 

Officers of the new chapter here are: Warren Stookey of Belleville, 
president; Louis Gaskins of harrisburg, vice president; Robert Clark of Vandalia, 
vice president and pledge master; Faul Moss of Christopher, secretary; Robert 
Mandrell of lit. Vernon, treasurer; Kerry Jackson of Chester, historian; Ray Springs 
of Herrin, song master. 

Committee chairmen include: Richard Thompson of Mt. Vernon, housing; Bill 
Ogden of Marion, program; Bill Mary of Collinsville, publicity; James Walker of 
Marion, fellowship and social; Robert Stevens of Marion, extension; and Alexander 
Sloan of McLeansboro, service projects, 

M## 

Carbondale, 111., May - Mabel Paterson of Carbondale, who will graduate 
in June from Southern Illinois University with a major in zoology, has been 
awarded a graduate assistantship at the University of Illinois for next year, 
according to Dr. W, M. Gersbacher, chairman of the zoology department. 

The assistantship carries a stipend of v 1200 plus tuition and fees. She 
will also carry on graduate work toward the master's degree. 

Miss Paterson graduated from University High School here at Southern, and 
has been an honor student throughout her four years in the University. Ker 
minor subjects have been chemistry and botany. She is a member of the Zoogenica 
Club and of FI Kappa Sigma social sorority. 






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Carbondale, 111., Kay - a composition by Dr. Maurits Kesnar, professor 
and chairman of the music department at Southern Illinois University, will be 
performed this summer by the St. Louis Little Symphony, under the direction of the 
famous conductor Stanley Chappie, Dr. Kesnar has been informed. 

The composition, "The Indian Flute," a tone poem for orchestra, will be 
presented July 2 at the quadrangle of Washington University. 

JIU-'LU 

ifTftrtr 

Carbondale, 111., Hay - Appointment of Ernest ,.olfe as executive assistant 
at Southern Illinois University, to supervise veterans housing and to assist in 
job placements for students and graduates, has been announced by University 
President Chester F. Lay. 

For approximately two years Mr. Lolfe has been chief of the Veterans Admin- 
istration Guidance Center located at the University, 

His appointment, which is effective immediately, releases Van a. Luboltz, 
of 
assistant professor/business administration, who has been serving as veterans 

housing supervisor, for full-time teaching duties. 

In addition, Mr. Wolfe will assist the Placement Service in locating positions 
for students and graduates in fields other than public school administration. 

His work in connection with veterans housing will consist of supervision of 
two emergency housing projects providing apartments for 200 married veterans, 
one adjacent to the campus, the other at the Illinois Ordnance Plant. 

Mr. Wolfe has studied at Blackburn College, has taught in public schools, 
and has had long experience in personnel work in Loth state and federal agencies. 

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Carbondale, 111., Kay - The Illinois Folklore Society will meet for a 
dinner session at Southern Illinois University Thursday, i-iay 27, at 6:30 p.m., 
according to John '„». Allen, University Kuseum history curator and society president. 
University President Chester F. Lay will speak to the group on folklore and its 
function in education; a report will be given of the recent National Folklore 
Festival; the story of a Southern Illinois ballad will be recounted, and a demon- 
stration of singing games will be presented by the Sing and Swing Club of University 
students, directed by David b. Mcintosh, associate professor of music. 



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Carbondale, 111., Kay - A "pop concert" will be presented by the Southern 
Illinois University orchestra here Thursday evening, Kay 27, at 8 p.m. in Shryock 
Auditorium, Dr. Kaurits Kesnar, music department chairman and orchestra conductor, 
has announced. 

The concert will feature the popular classics from Cluck to Ravel and 
Khachaturian. 

Kiss Carol ^.erner of Belleville, contralto, a senior music student, will be 
presented in a group of vocal solos, Dr. Kesnar said. 

Mrfff 

Release Monday 

Carbondale, 111., Kay 24- A group of Southern Illinois University business 

administration students, accompanied by several faculty members, are in St. Louis 

today attending an exhibit of office machines in Kiel Auditorium. 

The students include: James Burch of Carbondale, Karion Tally of hounds, Mrs. 
Betty J. Keller Casper of Cypress, Samuel Endicott of Car-mi, Charlotte Tuthill of 
Vergennes, Pauline Grader of East St. Louis, Lodema Ferrell of Harrisburg, Barbara 
Sigler of Joppa, Naomi Hancock of harrisburg, una Lee ^cClerren of Thompsonville, 
June Cunningham of I'inckneyville, and Kary Duncan of Vienna. 

The faculty members accompanying the students are Dr. Viola DuFrain, associate 
professor; Mrs. Bonnie Lockwood, instructor in University high; and Van A. Buboltz, 
assistant professor, 

Ernest Wolfe, new supervisor of veterans housing, also accompanied the group, 
and he and Mr. Buboltz, who has been serving in that capacity, attended to business 
matters pertaining to housing. 



Southern Z.Uinois 
University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, 1LL1NC 



^1S 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-24-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., May - Southern Illinois University's tennis 
and golf teams will round out their seasons here Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. 
when they play host to the Evansville College Purple Aces, whom they 
have previously defeated. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's baseball team will also attempt to 
gain its second win from Evansville at 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, at Southern's 
Chautauqua Street field. Then the Martinmen will travel to Charleston 
Saturday, May 29, to face Eastern Illinois State College in the finale. 

In the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference meets Friday 
and Saturday, the tennis Maroons of Coach Bill Freeburg finished third 
and the greensmen of Coach Lynn Holder came in fourth. 

Jack Mawdsley, sophomore tennis star from Granite City, won the 
division two singles title, and Bill Uilliams of Galatia and Bob 
"Squire" Armstrong of Carbondale lost in the singles finals of division, 
one and three, respectively. 

Oliver Shoaff of Mt, Carmel had the fourth best individual score 
for the golf meet., shooting 36 holes of the DuQuoin Country Club in 149 c 

m 



mammmm mmm ^ mmm ^ mimm Southern Illinois 

■^ "-"^ — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Attention: Sports Editors 5-24-43 

Carbondale, 111., May - The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference track and field meet Saturday ended as was expected, with 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College of DeKalb easily winning first 
place and the Southern Illinois University Maroons coming in second. 

In losing to Northern, the Maroons of Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle 
took only two firsts, but both of these were good for new conference 
records. 

In his last athletic competition for Southern, .uentin Stinson 
of Eldorado, concluding three brilliant years of stardom, threw the 
discus 147 T 7-2 ,? , erasing the old conference mark by over two feet. 

Sophomore Harold Hartley of Ashley established a new high-jump 
record, leaping 6 f 4 W to surpass the old conference record by a full 
inch. 

These were the only new records set, but another outstanding 
performance was a sizzling 9.7s 100-yard dash by Ronnie Jackson of 
Western Illinois State College. Paced by Jackson, who also won the 
220, Western finished third in the meet, followed by Illinois State 
Normal University and Eastern Illinois State College. 

Mi 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. HHHaHHHH^HHHHnB 



5-25-48 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May -The annual banquet for Southern Illinoi: 
University athletic letter-winners given by the Carbondale Business Men': 
Association will be held at 6:30 p.m., Monday, May 31, at the University 
Cafeteria. 

Centralia high school football and basketball coach Arthur L. Trout 
will speak to the Maroons who have earned letters in seven sports, footb^ 
cross-country, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, and golf, during 
the 1947-4$ school year. 

The Henry Hinkley Memorial Award, given annually to Southern's 
most outstanding athlete, will be presented to the man chosen by his 
fellow letter-winners at the banquet. Last year Quentin Stinson of 
Eldorado received the honor, and the previous year Sam Milosevich of 
Zeigler was chosen as Southern's greatest athletic star. 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
— — ■- — ^ ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. IMMHI^IIIIIIIMMMIMBIIIIIBMHIIH ■!■ 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May -One of Southern Illinois University's 
greatest athletic stars, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, who will be 
graduated in June, has accepted a position as head baseball end basketba 
and assistant football coach at DuQuoin Township High School. 

In accepting the DuQuoin job, Stinson, who had been drafted for pro 
basketball by the Minneapolis "Lakers" of the National Professional 
Basketball League, gave up the possibility of a professional career to 
enter the coaching field. 

Stinson climaxed his collegiate athletic crreer at Southern last 
Saturday when he established a new Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference record by throwing the discus 147' 7a". 

Stinson earned three letters each in basketball and track, and one 
in football. Each of his three seasons as a basketball regular, he was 
a member of the I.I.A.C. championship team. 

In 1946, his first season at Southern, he Dlayed an important nart 
in leading Southern to the National Intercollegiate Basketball 
Championship won at Kansas City. "Stilts" captained the Maroon basketba! 
squad during his senior year. 

For his brilliant basketball and track work in 1947, Stinson 

received the Henry Hinkley Memorial Award given each year to Southern's 

outstanding athlete. The person to receive the award is selected by a 
vote of all letter-winners in every sport* 

Stinson was a tackle on the Maroons' Corn Bowl and I.I.A.C. footbel." 
champions of 1947. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. mM^HnonugM^Kmtn 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., May -Tennis Coach Bill Freeburg has 
announced that his Southern Illinois University tennis team has elected 
captains for 194# and 1949. 

Bill Williams, senior from Galatia, was chosen as cantain of the 
194$ team which finished third in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference, Williams played number one singles throughout the season. 

Jack Mawdsley of Granite City, sophomore, was elected to lead the 
Maroons during the 1949 campaign. He was number two all season, and won 
the singles championship of the number two division of the I.I.A.C. 






m 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ai^^HHHH^HBi^HHHH^H 



Carbondale, 111., June - Unable to accept the invitation to 
attend the inauguration of Dr. Fred D. Fagg as president of the 
University of California, Dr. Chester F. Lay, president of Southern 
Illinois University, has designated an alumnus, Arthur W. Cox, 
superintendent of schools fat Long Beach, Calif., to represent Southern 
on that occasion. 

President Lay was invited to participate in the inaugural ceremonie: 
but because the date, June 11, coincides with Southern's own commencemenl 
exercises, was unable to accept, 

Mr. Cox, who will be Southern's official representative, graduated 
from this university in 1929* 



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Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. Dorothy Davies, chairman of the 
department of physical education for women at Southern Illinois 
University, recently represented the University at the inauguration of 
Dr. Wilber Wallace White as president of the University of Toledo, 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The installation address was given by Dr. Raymond Walters, president 
of the University of Cincinnati., Dr. Davies' alma mater. 

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V ' iS'iSVIiHj 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^mimiiiiiumiiim mmmiii i i 



Carbondale, 111., June - William Burns of 4$46 Lake St., Chicago, 
a junior has been elected president of the Student Council at Southern 
Illinois University for 194$-49. 

Other officers chosen by the 16-member body are: Betty Bain of 

Carbondale and Taylor Neely of Mulberry Grove, co-vice presidents; 
Madolyn Fisher of Karnak, secretary; and Bill Green of Fairfield, 
finance manager. 

Students are elected to the Student Council by each of the four 
undergraduate classes, but it will be late fall before the incoming 
freshman class will hold its election. Personnel deans in September 
will appoint four freshmen to serve on a temporary basis until the class 
election c an be held. 

Members elected by the other classes include: 

Seniors — Neely, Bill Thompson of Mt . Vernon, Betty Bramlet of 
Eldorado and Erma Douglas of Dcngola. 

Juniors- -Burns, Green, Miss Bain and Miss Fisher. 

Sophomores--Patte Maneese of Herrin, Pat Colligan of Granite City, 
Bob Lupella of 545 N. St. Louis St., Chicago and Fred Opper of 
Carlinville. 



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^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

^— ■■■■"■■ --— — ■ | ^— — ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^nwWFMMK^^M«»^M»wmi 



6-2-46 

Carbondale, 111., June - Activities for Senior Week at Southern 
Illinois University will get under v/ay Sunday, June 6, at 5:30 p. m. 
with baccalaureate services for the 194$ graduating class. 

Dr. Homer Price Rainey, president of Stephens College, will deliver 
the baccalaureate address. 

On Friday, June 11, at 9:30 a. m. Dr. John a. Stevenson], president 
of Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company and a prominent alumnus of 
Southern, will deliver the commencement address. 

Between these two ceremonies will come four days of social activitic 
in honor of the graduating seniors, who are excused from final 
examinations to participate in Senior Week affairs. 

Following the baccalaureate service on Sunday afternoon, President 
and Mrs. Chester F. Lay will entertain at their annual senior reception, 
to be held from o to 10 p. m. at Anthony Hall. 

Monday, the senior class picnic will be held from 2 to 7 p. m. at 
Giant City State Park. Tuesday morning, a swimming party will be held 
at Crab Orchard Lake, followed by a free movie in the afternoon at the 
Varsity Theatre, and a dance in the evening sponsored by the Student 
Council. 

On Wednesday a recreational period of volley ball, tennis and other 
sports is slated, and the seniors will be honored by the American 
Association of University Women in the afternoon. At 3:30 p. m. the 



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senior class will be featured on the University Hour radio program over 

Station WCIL, Carbondale, and in the evening the class banquet will be 

staged at the University Cafeteria. ill 

A morning coffee at the Cafeteria Thursday will be followed in the 
afternoon by t wo Softball games, one for men, one for women, pitting 
seniors against faculty members. The annual alumni banquet will be held 
Thursday evening. 



Carbondale-, 111., June - William D. Hatley of Carrier Mills, 
graduate student at Southern Illinois University, has received a |1,000 
teaching assistantship at the University of Missouri xor next year, Dr. 
Willis G. Swart z, chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee, has 
announced. 

Hatley will complete the master of science in education degree at 
Southern this June, and will work toward, the doctor's degree at Missouri. 

He has majored in government, and has held a graduate assistantship 
this year, 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

E— ■■ — ■— ■ ^^— i^^^-^— University 

Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^vt^^^HaHH^HMC^^KaBOMi 



Attention: Sports Editors 6-2-48 

Carbondale, 111., June - When they lost their final game to 
Eastern Illinois State College at Charleston last Saturday by a score of 
9 to 2, the Southern Illinois University baseball Maroons closed their 
19A-S season with a record of four wins against nine losses. 

Bill Bleyer of Carterville, second baseman, was elected as the 
;i Most-Valuable w player by his teammates at the condlusion of the season. 
Bleyer was a left-handed power-hitter who batted well over .300 and was 
one of Southern's most dependable defensive infielders, performing 
brilliantly as the pivot man on numerous double-plays. 

irinr 



Correction 

Carbondale, 111., June - It was erroneously reported that 
Eastern Illinois State College finished last in the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Track and Field Meet here May 22. 
Eastern Illinois finished fourth, and it was Illinois State Normal 

University that finished fifth. 

ii a a 
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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. BHBHfli^HH9HBIHHHHHHHBHBMHKS|l 



Attention: Sports Editors 6-2-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., June - All Southern Illinois University athletic 
letterrnen for the 1947-4$ school year have been invited to be the guests 
of the Carbondale Business Association at a banquet Monday, June 7, at 
6:30 p.m. at the University Cafeteria. 

Each year the Carbondale Business men give this banquet to Maroon 
athletes. Centralia high school Coach Arthur L. Trout, the dean of 
Illinois high school coaches, will deliver the principal address. The 
occasion will also be high- lighted by the selection of the man to receive 
the H enry Hinkley Memorial nward as the outstanding Maroon athlete of 
the year. 

This award was established by Nu Epsilon Alpha Fraternity in memory 
I of Henry Hinkley of Alma, a fraternity member and former football star 
who was killed in service. The man receiving this honor is chosen by 
a vote of Southern letter-winners at the banquet. 

Speculation about who will be chosen as the outstanding athlete is 
often inaccurate. Last year C^uentin Stinson of Eldorado won the honor, 
and since there is no restriction about winning the award more than 
once, he is a possible two-time selection. 

Other possibilities are Bob Colborn of Flora and Joe Hughes of West 
Frankfort. A number of other men who have competed in two and three 
sports are also possible winners. 

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^^^^ a ^^^ a ^^^ miiammmm ^^ mm Southern Illinois 

p— — ■—■ ~"^— ■— ^^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. «aPH^«!^KMM^»BMMKWi»i» 



6-2-43 

Carhondale, 111., June - a number of summer appointments and a 
permanent addition to the faculty of Southern Illinois University have 
been announced by University P'resident Chester F. Lay, 

Charles D. Neal, principal of Sadorus (111.) Community High School, 
has been appointed associate professor of education in the College of 
Education, effective Sept. 13. Mr, Neal holds the bachelor's degree 
from Indiana University and the master's degree from both Indiana 
University and the University of Illinois. He has taught in the public 
schools of both states. 

Dr. Eugene J. McFarland, head of the department of fine arts at 
Ohio Uesleyan University, has been named professor of art for the summer 
term and Dr. Irene A. Moke from Oberlin College, has been given a summer 
appointment as assistant professor of geography. 

Dr. McFarland holds the bachelor of fine arts degree from the 
University of Kansas City; the master of fine arts from Escuela 
Universitaria de Bellas Artes, Mexico;- and the doctor of philosophy from 
Ohio St^ite University. He has taught at Phillips University and the 
Columbus School of Art. 

Twenty of his paintings are now on exhibit in a one-man show at the 
Laurel Gallery in New York City. He has exhibited at the Columbus 
Museum of Fine Arts, the Philbrook nrt Museum, the Oklahoma City Fine 
Arts Center, the St. Joseph (Mo.) Museum of Art, the Universities of 

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Kansas, Oklahoma, Southern California and Ohio Wesleyan, and here at 

Southern Illinois University. 

Dr. Moke is a graduate of Ohio University and holds the master's 
and doctor's degrees from the University of Nebraska, and has taught 
at the latter institution. 

Other staff changes announced by President Lay included: 
appointment of Miss Norma Trotter of Cisne as faculty assistant, 
effective June 14, to serve as acting recorder in the Registrar's 
Office, replacing Arthur Halfar, who has resigned. Miss Trotter will 
receive the bachelor ? s degree from Southern in June. She has worked 
for three years as a student assistant in the Registrar's Office. 

Granting of a leave of absence for the month of August to Mrs. 
Alice P. Rector, assistant to the dean of men and the dean of women, in 
order that she may carry on graduate studies at the University of Denver. 

Resignation of Dr. Kenneth D. Luney from the position of associate 
professor of economics, in order to go into private business. Dr. Luney. 
who came to Southern last summer, has been on sick leave during the 
current school year, 

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_ _^^^^_^^^^_^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
— i ■— — — ^— —■ ^— —— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. SM^^^MBMU^M^^MW^HUlsmtf 



6-4-4S 

Carbondale, 111., June - Though the farmer today possesses a 
financial advantage over the factory worker and other non-agricultural 
producer, it should be remembered he may be the first to suffer in the 
event of a depression, a Southern Illinois University economics student 
declared in a recent radio broadcast. 

The class in business cycles, conducted by Dr. Lewis a, Maverick, 
professor of economics, recently produced a radio program over Station 
WCIL, reporting on current conditions in business. 

Albert Kelly of Coultervilie, who analyzed farm prices, advised the 
farmer to prepare for falling prices in the next four or five years- 
sunless there is another war. 1? 

Kelly showed that farm prices today are much the same in relation 
to net income as they were in 1920, "which was at the peak of the 
inflation of the first world war," he said. 

"When we compare farm prices of 194$ to those of 1940, just before 
the outbreak of World War II, we find they are about 3 3/4 times higher 
today, while costs have only doubled," he said. 

He stressed that the relation of post-war income to post-war costs 
!! is the factor that determines whether or not the farmer is making an 

increased net income. 1 ' 

- 

;, 0f course distribution costs of living are increased today. 
Nevertheless, the farmer is at a disadvantage over the factory worker and 

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other non-agricultural producers in periods of slowly rising prices due 

to inflation." 

Kelly reminded the radio audience that the farmer was the first to 
feel the depression after the first v.orld war, and predicted that he 
might also be the first to suffer if a depression occurs after World 
War II. 

"As long as there is a high demand for farm products both in foreign 
countries and in the United States, the farmers will not suffer, " he said. 

"But when there develops a lack of demand for farm produce, at today 1 , 
high costs, the farmers will lose heavily. 

"Undoubtedly the world cannot continue to consume in increasing 
quantities, and without paying for its purchases, therefore, the farmer 
should prepare for falling prices within the next four or five years, 
unless inflation is aggrevated still further by another war. 

"Another war would probably reduce our dollar to about 10 cents in 
purchasing power," he added. 

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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-4-4^ 

Carbondale, 111., June - "Old Main 5 ' at Southern Illinois University 
has the somewhat dubious social but highly desirable scientific 
distinction of housing in its belfry the only large colony of bats in 
the Middle West, according to University of Indiana Medical. School 
researchers. 

Two professors from the Indiana Medical School, Dr. Paul Nicoll and 
Dr. Richard L. Webb, recently visited the Southern campus to collect 
specimens of the bats for laboratory investigations. 

They are making a study of the circulatory system in the bat T s wings, 
and hope to breed their own supply of the winged mammals. 

On their recent visit here, they considered themselves fortunate to 
secure baby bats, some of them still attached to the mothers' wings. 



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Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. Leslie L. Chisholm, 1929 graduate of 
Southern Illinois University and at present a member of the education 
department faculty at the University of Nebraska is the author of a new 
book, 1? Guiding Youth in the Secondary School." 

In notifying University President Chester F. Lay of the publication 
of his new work, Dr. Chisholm expressed the hope that everything is 
going ?? nicely at Southern Illinois University." Dr. Chisholm' s home 
was in Olive Branch when he was a student here. 

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Southern Illinois 



i!» i ^^^^™^~- , ™™-^~^™^~ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 



LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. 



Attention: Sports Editors 6-4-4& 

Carbondale, 111., June - Athletic Director Glenn ">ibe !! Martin has 
announced the names of 51 Southern Illinois University letter-winners in 
the spring sports, baseball, track, tennis, and golf. 

Baseball: Walt Frazer, Pinckneyville; William Bauer, Freeburg; Clyde 
Leilich, New Athens; Bill Bleyer, Carterville; Charles Durham, West 
Frankfort; William Elder, Eldorado; Jesse Payne, Carbondale; Charles Gree 
Johnston City; Bob Goalby, Belleville; Bob Johnson, DuQuoin; Don Glover, 
Mt. Vernon; Marion Moake, Marion; Don Ragsuale, DeSoto; Bernard 
Heiligenstein, Freeburg; and Bill Bonali, Herrin, manager. 

Track: Willis Anderson, Burkburnett, Texas; George Beltz, Marion; 
Robert Braaen, Valier; Joe Budde, Belleville; Jim Cole, Norris City; 
John Robert Creek, Herrin; Charles Dahncke, Ashley; Norris Garner, Wayne 
City; Harold Hartley, Ashley; Truman Hill, Benton; Joe Hughes, West 
Frankfort; Charles Mathieu, Eldorado; Gene McFarland, Johnston City; Joe 
McLafferty, Carbondale; Edward Miller, Carbondale; Paul Moss, Christopher 
Bob Neighbors, Belleville; Ray Palmer, Belleville; Mike Sortal, Zeigler; 
Quentin Stinson, Eldorado; Adrian Stonecipher, Salem; Lawrence Taliana, 
Mt. Vernon; Bill Winning, Herrin; and Jim Pienfro, Carbondale, manager. 

Tennis: Bill Williams, Galatia; Bob Armstrong, Carbondale; Jack 
Mawdsley, Granite City; Dick Vorwald, Granite City; Bob Harmon, Lincoln; 
and Q. D. Miskell, Carbondale. 

Golf: Oliver Shoaff, Mt. Carmel; Ward Armstrong, Hoopeston; Jim 
John, Mt. Carmel, Ralph Parrish, Carbondale, and John Deadman, Carbondale 

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I— i^— ■ — — ^ i^— i^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HH^mmHBmsnwHHnw 



6-7-46 



Carbondale, 111., June -Degrees will be conferred on 239 Southern 
Illinois University students--26 candidates for the master of science in 
education degree and 213 for the various bachelor's degrees--by Frank 
G. Thompson, state director of registration and education and chairman oi 
the Teachers College Board, at the annual commencement exercises here 
Friday morning, June 11. 

The exercises will be held at Shryock Auditorium, starting at 9:30 £ 

Commencement speaker for the occasion is Dr. John A. Stevenson, 
president of Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. and a prominent Southern alms 

Exercises will be opened by the University Symphony Orchestra, play: 
as a processional for the academic procession invocation'" written by Dr. 
Maurits Kesnar, professor and chairman of the University music department 
As a recessional, the orchestra will play "Coronation March" by Svendsen. 

The Rev. J.G. Whiteside, representing the Fairfield Ministerial 
Association, will deliver the invocation, while the benediction will be 
pronounced by the Rev. A. Cadman Garret son, representing the Salem 
Ministerial Association. 

Miss Carol Werner of Belleville, a senior music student, will be 
presented in a contralto solo, "Sesquedille" from Carmen by Bizet. 

Candidates for degrees will be presented to Director Thompson by 
President Chester F. Lay. 

At the conclusion of the exercises, the faculty, students, parents 
and guests are invited to a reception in the office of the President, 



"# 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



6-7-4& 

Carbondale, 111., June 7 - In urging the development of a new 
concept of politics and a new type of leadership for the United States, 
a distinguished educator Sunday night told members of Southern Illinois 
University's graduating class that we have virtually "a sit-down strike 
on good citizenship." 

Dr. Homer Price Rainey, president of Stephens College and an 
ordained Raptist minister, in delivering the baccalaureate address to 
the Southern seniors, deplored the fact that "we almost have a national 
slogan — tion't stick your neck out' 1 '. 

The United States, he declared, rates as the No. 1 nation in the 
world — economically, militarily, and politically, 

"The time of our glory has arrived," he said. "History tells us 
that no nation has maintained its pre-eminence indefinitely. If we are 
to maintain our greatness and prolong our pre-eminence, we must recognize 
the moral and spiritual obligation to use that leadership wisely. 

"We are being challenged by Russia," he said. "Our young people 
are in competition with the youth of Russia, who outnumber our youth 
four to one. 

"We must make up that imbalance in numbers by other factors," he 
insisted. 

Russia is saying the great capitalistic democracies have failed — 
"Xou know their line of propaganda as well as I" — the speaker reminded. 

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Ee pointed out that democracy is caught between communism and fascist. 

"I can''t see why anyone should be fearful that either can triumph 
over democracy, 1 ' he said, "for I can ! t see what either has to offer 
the people of the world that is comparable to our Christianity and our 
democracy, if we will only make them work." 

Citing that more than half the people of the world are today living 
on below-starvation diets and that 52 per cent can neither read nor writ< 
Dr. Rainey declared that "the world is calling on us to make good on our 
promises." 

"Our nation has had a moral purpose since its founding — a purpose 
that has been expressed and re-expressed in documents and by our leaders 
many times," he said. 

"We are the moral champions of the underprivileged people — not just 
of the United States, but of the world." 

To retain its greatness, the United states must strengthen the mora, 
and spiritual responsibility of its leadership, the speaker declared, 
and listed several things that must "go into our training." 

These, he said include: (1) development of a wise use of our power: 

(2) a new concept of education — "we r ve got to think in world terms"; 

(3) a new concept of politics--"politics ought to be our highest social 
art, drawing men and women of intelligence, integrity, character and 
leadership"; and (1+) a new type of leadership. 

"I sense that a great fear has gripped the American public," he saic 
"Why, at the time pf our greatest power, should we be confused and 

fearful and uncertain about what we believe in and about the way we shoul 

go?" he asked. 

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"lt can result in tragedy unless we can get hold of a great faith, 
some strong affirmations. Otherwise we shall fail the people of the 
world and ourselves as well." 

Dr. Rainey spoke at the vesper baccalaureate service Sunday evening. 
The invocation was delivered by Phillip Harris, national superintendent 
of Young People's Work for the Southern Baptist Convention, Nashville , 
Tenn. , while the benediction was given by the Rev. H.T. Rafnel, 
representing the Murphysboro Ministerial Association. University Presidf 
Chester F. Lay introduced the guest speaker, Dr. Rainey. 

Senior Week activities at Southern will continue through the current 
week, culminating with the commencement exercises on Friday morning, at 
9:30 a.m., when Dr. John A. Stevenson, president of Penn Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, will deliver the commencement address. 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-9-4B 

Carbondale, 111., June - Summer session will open at Southern 
Illinois University Monday, June 14, when students will register for 
the ei ht-weeks ! session. Classes will begin Tuesday, June 15 • 

Seventeen visiting faculty members have been added to the University 
staff for the summer, accoraing to Dr. Charles D. Tenney, director of 
the summer session. 

There will be no courses offered during August, Dr. Tenney said. 

a separate commencement program will be held August 6 for summer 
graduates, an innovation at Southern. 

Several workshops have been set up for the summer, both on and off 
campus, in addition to the regular b attery of courses. 

An elementary and rural education workshop will open at Centralia 
June 14, to run four weeks, staffed by R. J. Fligor of the regular 
University faculty, Miss Mabel Carney, former director of rural educatior. 
at Columbia University, and Earl Dawes, assistant county superintendent 
of schools of St. Clair County. Both Miss Carney and Mr. Dawes have beer, 
appointed to the University staff for the summer. 

The same staff — Mr. Fligor, Miss Carney and Mr. Dawes--will conduct 
a second elementary and rural education workshop at Cairo July 12-Aug. 6. 

a similar workshop, running eight weeks, June 14- Aug. 6, will be 

carried on here at the University for resident students. A health 

education workshop will also be conducted on the campus during the 

summer session. 

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During August, a series of 11 conservation workshops , each of one 
week's duration, will be conducted in various Southern Illinois counties 
under the sponsorship of the Extension Service. The agriculture and 
geography departments will staff the workshops. These workshops are 
scheduled as follows: Aug. 9-13, Hamilton, Marion, White and Jackson 
counties; Aug. 16-20, Union, Massac, Jefferson and Hardin counties; 
Aug, 23-27, Perry, Washington and Monroe counties. 

In addition to the regular curriculum, several conferences and othei 
special events will be held during the summer session to attract educatoi 
and others to the campus and to provide added stimulation for summer 
session students. 

The quarterly Child Guidance Clinic will be held June 23-24. 

A three-day School Reorganization Conference is planned for June 
23-25, to which county superintendents, city superintendents, principals 
and school board members are being invited. 

The annual Educational Exhibit of textbooks and other school 
materials is scheduled for July 7-&, and the annual Parent-Teacher-: 
Conference is set for the same dates. Also at that time, a Transportatic 
Conference is being arranged. 

a number of new courses have been provided for the 194$ summer 
session at Southern, including school library service, audio-visual 
ethods, and 10$ mathematics (solid geometry). 

Recreational opportunities will include free swimming, including 
free transportation and free admission, at Crab Orchard Lake, several 
times a week, provided by the men's and women's physical education 
departments. Several play ni hts are also to be arranged, 

A number of cultural and entertainment programs will be arranged 
by the Lectures and Entertainment Committee. 

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Visiting faculty members for the summer term include the following: 
Miss Carney, professor of education; Walter K. Correll, faculty assistant 
in University High School; Miss Doris Crader, faculty assistant in 
foreign language; Kenneth E. Cross, instructor in University High School; 
Mr. Dawes, instructor in education; Woodrow Fildes, faculty assistant in 
mathematics; Woodson W. Fishback, associate professor of education; 
Harry F. Jackson, associate professor of history; Mrs. Marjory D. Lyons, 
instructor in physical education for women; Dr. Eugene J. McFarland, 
professor of art; Dr. Irene A. Moke, assistant professor in geography; 
Miss Thelma Phillips, instructor in University High School; Mrs. Bernice 
L. Sickman, faculty assistant in rural education; David M. Stroup, 
instructor in University High School; Miss Amy Turnell, instructor in 
physical education for women; Dr. Kenneth W. Wegner, associate professor 
of mathematics; Arnold Wendt, faculty assistant in mathematics. 

In addition to the visiting summer faculty members, several people 
will join the staff this summer to remain next year: Miss Norma Trotter 
as faculty assistant in the Registrar's Office; Dr. W. J. Tudor as 
associate professor of sociology; James J. Wilkinson as instructor in 
physical education for men; Roye E. Bryant as executive assistant in 
education and administration; and Miss Loretta Keough, faculty assistant 
in the Dean of Women's Office. 

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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. aMHH»HaEBHRnHBaHHBMHHaBH 



Do Not Release before June 10 

Carbondale, 111., June 10 - Bids today were called for on constructi 
of the new training school building at Southern Illinois University, 
University officials were notified by Frank G. Thompson, chairman of the 
State Teachers College Board. 

Mr. Thompson, director of the State Department of Registration and 
Education, informed University President Chester F. Lay that C. Herrick 
Hammond, supervising architect of the Division of Architecture and 
Engineering, today is advertising for bids on the new two and a quarter 
million dollar building. 

Bids are to be received June 30, and it is hoped, Director Thompson 
said, that the Division of Architecture and Engineering and the Teachers 
College Board will be able to award the contract immediately. 

Award of the contract, of course, is contingent upon whether or not 
bids are within the appropriation available for the building. 

Director Thompson reported that the board is jubiliant over the fact 
that this new building, so badly needed at the University, is soon to be 
built. 

The new training school will be the first educational building to 
be constructed at Southern in nearly 20 years, and is the first in a 
series which are necessary to the expansion of this growing university, 
he added. Construction is going forward on a new '#1, 4.00, 000 power plant 
and distribution system. 

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n This is the greatest news we have had at Southern in a long time, 5 ' 
University President Chester F. Lay declared. The faculty, administratis 
and friends of Southern have looked forward to the construction of the 
training school for many years. We sincerely hope' that it will be 
followed in the next biennium by several other structures on our 
w priority list" of urgently needed buildings. 5 ' 



^^^^^^^^________ Southern Illinois 

— -—-— ■—■—■■— — — — i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. j^^^^^^^—.^^——^^^^—^^ 



Release Friday P.M. 6-10-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., June 11 - Degrees were conferred on 23$ graduates- 
26 master's degrees and 212 bachelor's degrees~-of Southern Illinois 
University here this morning. 

These numbers compare with 19 master's and 193 bachelor's, a total 
of 212 in June, 1947 * 

Degree candidates were presented by University President Chester F. 
Lay and diplomas were conferred by Frank G. Thompson, chairman of the 
Illinois State Teachers College Board and director of the State 
Department of Registration and Education. 

The candidates for bachelor's degrees included 142 for the bachelor 
of science in education, 41 for the bachelor of arts and 13 for the 
bachelor of science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and 16 
for the bachelor of science in the College of Vocations and Professions, 

Degrees with highest honors were conferred on the following: 
Juanita June Fulkerson of Carbondale ancl. Karl E. Plumlee of DuQuoin, 

Degrees with hl;h honors went to Laura B. Baker of Raleigh, Harry 
N. McMurray of DuQuoin, Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, and Clem 
George Wiedman of Effingham, 

Degrees with honors were awarded to Robert Files Etheridge of 
Fairfield, Elmer Gilley of Harrisburg, Lawrence E. Green of Patoka, 
Betty Louise Hawkins of T ;alnut Hill, Frank B. Moake of Carbondale, Mabel 
C. Pater son of Carbondale, Velma Ruth Smith of Crab Orchard, Norma 
Trotter of Cisne, and William Carl Wimberly of Carbondale, 

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Three students received two degree each — Kifton K. Dillow of Jonesbo 
the bachelor of science in education and the bachelor of arts in liberal 
arts and sciences; John Ellis Dornbach of Belleville , the bachelor of 
science in education and the bachelor of arts in liberal arts and 
sciences; Robert S, Winegarner of Maris sa, the bachelor of science in 
education and bachelor of science in liberal arts and sciences. 

One hushand-and-wife team finished work for their degrees, Virgil 
Lee Seymour of Ellis Grove received the master's and his wife Marjorie 
Beare Seymour was awarded the bachelor's degree in education. 

The complete list of students receiving degrees is as follows: 

ANNA: Master of Science in Education Degree - -Willi am Warren Townes. 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Sarah Jane Harper. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
John Samuel McFeron. 

BELKNAP: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Dorothy Louise 
Buddenbaum. 

BELLEVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --John Ellis 
Dornbach, Carol Lee Werner. 

Bachelor of Arts Decree in the C^J-le^ of Liberal Arts and Sciences - 
John Ellis Dornbach. 

BENLD: Bachelor of Scienc e in Education De, .ree — George Zebrun 
(In absentia) . 

BENTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree-- Jack Hayse, 
Harley Buntin Neal, Emma June Pinkham, Mary Lou Pinkham, Mary Louise 

Tedrowy. 

» 

BLRWYN: Master of Science in Education D ecree — Ledford J. Bischoff. 
BRO'JNSTOWN: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Science s — Elta Willms. 

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• BUNCOMBE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --01eva Lovelace. 

CARBONDALE: Master of Science in Education Decree- -David T. Kenney, 
T "aldo D. McDonald, Josie Marie Ruf fin-Russell, Ruth Entsminger Etherton. 

Bachelor of Science in Education Decree - -Charles Verdell Anderson, 
Ella Marie Brinson Arnette, Laura B. Baker, George H. Baysinger, Ray 
Dickey Brewer, Mariam Lorraine Carrington, Charles E. Crouch, Robert R. 
Curtis, Mary Elizabeth Davis, Maurice Charles Deniston, James Beaupre 
Dodd, Nona Grace Eade, Juanita June Fulkerson, Barbara Ann Haroldson, 
Roy J. Harris, Wanda C. Kenney, Cheseldean Killin^sworth, Edward James 
Larson, Clarence I. Logan, nrley W. Ludwig, William McBride, Frank F. 
Moake, Carl L. Rody, Mildred Jean Bayless Rowe, (In Absentia) Paul Smith. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Robert C. Ashby, Robert P. Baysinger, Warren Quentin Bradley, Bill D. 
Hudgens, Mabel C, Paterson, Robert Pulliam, Albert Gene Shafter, Wanda 
Preuss Watson, Warren Ernest Lunde (In Absentia). 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Science s--George Thomas Mitchell, Gordon Eugene Eade. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and Professio 
Clarence Almas Ball, Harry C. Gurm, James Lindsay McPhail, Joseph Carl 
Trobaugh. 

CARMI: Master of Science in Education Degree -- John Clifford 
(In Absentia) . 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Robert S. Nolen. 

CARRIER MILLS: Master of Science in Education Degree — William D. 

Hatley, Joseph Webb Cholson. 

« 

CaRTER VILLE: Bachel or of Science in Education Degree--Dorothy 

Rushing Bleyer, Helen Holmes. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 

Sciences--Robert D. Triplett, 

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CaSEYVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Leonard J. 
Snadden. 

CENTRaLIA: Bachelor of Science in Education Der;ree --Oral L. Telfor< 
Margaret Irene Woodward Williams. 

Bachelor of Arts Decree in the College of Liberal Arts--Lloyd R, 
Evilsizer. 

CHESTER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Mary Lucinda 
Whiteside. 

CHICAGO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Elaine McRaven. 

CHRISTOPHER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Rose Antonact 
Woodward, Ilarceline Williams Rogers, 

Bachelor of Arts of the College of L iberal Arts and Sciences -- 
David Preston Richerson. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts — Carl 
Walker Lutes. 

CISNE: Bachelor of Science in. Education Degree — Norma Trotter. 

COBDBN: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts-- 
William Lynn Casper. 

COLLINSVILLE : Bachelo r of Scie nce in Education Degree-- J. Albert 
Zebio. 

CRAB ORCHARD: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Velma Ruth 
Smith. 

CREAL SPRINGS: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Marie 
Robertson. 

CUTLER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Larnz William Bun 

DECATUR: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -W i 1 1 i am T. Joplir 

DONGOLa: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Margie Pauline 
Hinkle. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 

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Professions — Elmer F. Adams. 

DOWELL: B achelor of Science in Education Degree — Marian Frances 
Gruber. 

DUt^UOIN: Bachelor of Science in Education — Loretta Crider. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal arts — Harry N. 
Mchurray. 

Bachelor of Science Decree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences--Karl E. Plumlee, 

E. ST. LOUIS: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Pauline 
Rose Crader, Leo Carvell Higgins, John L. Jacobs, Kermit Joseph Jeffers. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 
Prof essions--Silas E. Smith, Jr. 

EFFINGHaM: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Clem George 
Wiedman. 

ELDORADO: Master of Science in Education D egree - -Phillip Theodore 
Cain, 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Helen Gynelle Robinson, 
Quentin Phillip Stinson, Delbert A. Waller. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Carl Behla Ferrell, Charles Gilbert Smith. 

ELIZaBLTHTOVJN: Master of Science in Education Degree - -Reginald E. 
Frailey (In Absentia). 

ELLIS GROVE: Master of Science in Education Degree - -Virgil Lee 
Seymour. 

Bachelor of Scienc e in Education Degre e- -Mar ,1 or i e Beare Seymour. 

EQUALITY: Bachelor of Scie nce Degree in the College of Vocations 
and Professions — D. Gone Sanks. 

FAIRFIELD: Master of Science in Education Degree — Charles Leland 



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Feller. 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Mary ..lice I vers. 

B achelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts — Robert 
Files Etheridge. 

FLORA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -William N, Malinsky 

GALATIA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Jacqueline Jean 
Harris. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and Professio 
William Edward Williams. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences-. 
Arthur R. Williams, 

GEFF : Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 
Professions--George A, Russell. 

GORHaM: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree- -LeRoy Pittman 
(In .absentia) , 

GRAND CHAIN: Bachelor of Science in Education D egree — William G« 
Benninger. 

GRAND TOWER: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences--John Albert Hausser. 

GRANITE CITY; Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — William 
Carl Wimberly. 

HaRRISBURG: Master of Science in Education Degree --Louis G. Businar 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Bruce Gordon Hardesty. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences- -Catherine Sullivan. 

bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and Pro- 
fessions — Robert E. Pulliam, Elmer R, Gilley (In Absentia). 

HaRVEY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degre e — Joan Fairbairn 

Terrell. 

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HERRIN: Master of Science in Education Degree — Mary Rose Colombo, 

Edward Clyde Goodnight, 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Naomi A. H. Kuehner, 
Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts — Wilma June 

Ferguson, John Woodford Mulkin. 

HOOPESTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Edith Brasel 

Gooch. 

HURST: Master of Science in Education Degree - -Robert Francis Catlet 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Nedra Reames, 

IRVINGTON: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 

and Sciences — Ernest Leslie Propes, 

IUKA: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 

Professions--Marion Thurston Middleton. 

JOHNSTON CITY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Leedio 

Cabutti, Helen Adams Jones, Merrill C. Peterson, Louis Vieceli, Robert 

F. Wells, Robert Richard Hunter (In Absentia). 
I 

JONESBORO: Master of Science in Education Degree — Robert Eugene 
;l Collard. 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Kif ton K. Dillow, Paul K. 
Lynn, Velma M. Roberts, 

Bachelor of Arts Decree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences-- 
Kifton K. Dillow, James L. Nettleton. 

KEENES: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Hayward L. Wood, 

MaRION: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — June Cannon, 
Claire Hudgens, 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Charles L. Swinney, Jr., Lois M. Sprinkle, George J. Pulley 
(In Absentia) , 

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Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts- -Marilyn 
June Henderson, Willard E, Rodd. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 
Professions — Edward Holland Aikman, 

MARISSA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Robert Smith 
Winegarner, 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Robert Smith Winegarner, 

MaYVOOD: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - -Marilyn L. Becht, 

McLEANSBORO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree--Howard W, 
Goin, 

METROPOLIS: Bachelor of Science in Educatio n Degree- -Char lott a H. 
Crim. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Joseph Calvin Evers, Vernie T. Barnett, 

KILL SHOALS: Bachelor of Science in Educatio n Degree - -Chester 
Forrest Newby, 

MONSaNTO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Vera Turner. 

MOUND CITY: Master of Science in Education Degree - -Harry C. Walker. 

MOUNDS: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts-- 
Wardell Armond England, 

MT. CARMEL: Bachelor of Science in Education Decree --Oliver R, 
Shoaff. 

MT. VLRNON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Homer H, 
Badgett, Millie Joeetta Person, 

MURPHYSBORO: Master of Science in Education Degree — Woodrow M. 
Fildes, Emma Smith Hough, 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Dorris Jean Bantel, 

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Marjorie Lee Bechtlofft, Christina B. Blank, Eugenia Janet Etherton, 
Peggy G. Hauner, Vertus Casper Keith, Loretta Keough, George W. Rodman, 
Jr., Roger E. Spear. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Wallace Elmus Akin (In Absentia), and T . T ayne L. Burkey (In Absentia), 

Bachelor of Science Decree in the College of Vocations and 
Professions — Marvin F, Mc Bride (In Absentia). 

NASHVILLE: Bachelor of Scienc e in Education Degree_- -Helen Louise 
Francis. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Paul William Reeder. 

OMaHa: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Martha Pearl 
Stallings. 

OZaRK: Bachelor of Science in Education De- ree — Mary Elizabeth 
Caldwell. 

PkTOK-a: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Lawrence E. Green. 

PERCY: Master of S cience in Education Degree — Helen Rosalie Brown, 
Loraine Lillian Waters* 

PINCKNEYVTLLE: Bachelor of ..rts Degree in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences--Martin Paul Schroedel, Clarence Peter Shumaier. 

PLEASANT HILL: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Marjorie 
Elizabeth Galloway. 

RALEIGH: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Helen Marie Hale. 

RAYMOND: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Eldon Ellis 
Bethard. 

RED BUD: Master of Science in Education De:-;ree — Arnold V/endt. 

ROYaLTON: Bachelor of Scienc e in Education Degree — Margaret 
Kinsman, Mary Emma Stephens. 

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RUSHVILLE: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences — Marlin Glenn Bunfill. 

SALEM: BacEelor of Science Decree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences--Eugene Allen Monroe. 

SESSER: Bachelor of Science in Education De^ree--Laura Anderson 
Raymon (In Absentia), 

SPARTA : Bachelor of Science in Education Degree »-F lor ine L. 
LcConachie, 

SPRINGFIELD: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences — Raymond LeRoy Terrell, 

STEELEVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Helen Jay 
Phifer. 

STEGERi Bachelor of Science in Education Decree --Alice Jane 
Newhouse Fults» 

ST0NEP0RT: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree s-William W. Hal3 

TEXICO; Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences"— William Francis Price, 

TRENTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree. - -Ethel S, 
Doelling, 

VaLIERJ Bachelor of S cience in Education Degree — Alda M, Fiore, 

VALMEYER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree- -Robert John 
Althoff, 

VERGENNES: Bachelor of Science in Education D egree — Donald Ray 
Grubb, Charlotte Elizabeth Tuthill, 

VIENNa : Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Hellen Mary 
Robertson. 

WALNUT HILL: Bachelor of Scienc e in Education Degree — Betty Louise 
Hawkins. 

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WaTLRLOO: Bachelor of Science Decree in the College of Vocations 
and Professions — Howard F. Ludwig. 

WaYNE CITY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree--Verna Lee Leggj 
Evelyn Meyers Miller. 

WEST FRANKFORT: Master of Science in Education Degree — Troy Clyde 
Dorris (In Absentia). 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — C. Harold Goddard, Bettye 
June Lockman, Jack Edward Reak, Alice Lucille Vravick, William Dale 
Wilkinson, Annettie Whittington Junkins (In Absentia). 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Kenneth B. Hedges, Willia E. McCray, Jr., John Maurice Bristow (In 
Absentia) . 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Robert D. Rawson. 

WOLF LAKE: Bachelor of S cience in Educ ation Degree — Harry W. Carter 

ZEIGLEK: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Bill H. 
Ferketich, Betty Jean Kish, Raymond E. Owens. 

DESOTO, MISSOURI: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree--Peggy 
Lou Browning, 

POPULAR BLUFF, MISSOURI: Master of Science in Education Degree — 
Amy Mae Jones, 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — 
Bette Jean Logsdon, 

aLLENHURST, NB t JERSEY: Bachelor of Science in the College of Liber 
Arts and Sciences — Urie Allen Parkhill. (In Absentia), 

AKRON, OHIO: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences—Shirley Lee Ludwig (In Absentia).. 

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON: Bachelor of Scien ce degree in the College of 
Vocations and Professions--Kinuye Jitodai. 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
— i— — "^ — — — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. g^^^^^Hii^^aH 



6-10-43 

Release Friday p.m» 

(Note to Editor: The list of students receiving decrees is bein°; sent 
you herewith, in a separate story.) 

Carbondale, 111., June 11 -"We must learn to think internationally 
if we are to solve the major political problems of today," Dr. John A. 
Stevenson, president of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, today 
told the 194$ graduating class of Southern Illinois University/- here this 
morning. 

A native of Cobden, 111., and a graduate of Southern's 1905ttwo- 
year class, Dr. Stevenson was presented to the graduates, their parents 
and friends by University President Chester F, Lay. 

"Just as the leaders in history found it necessary to educate the 
people to think beyond the confines of their own communities," he said, 
"so the leaders of today must helr> the peoole to realize that we cannot 
confine our thinking to the boundaries of the United States." 

Fointing to "new standards, new methods end new discoveries," he 
called attention to the vast advances that have taken place in the space 
of a few generations. 

"We have witnessed an almost fantastic increase in the speed of 
travel and of communications, and our laboratories are seething with new 
products which are being translated into new jobs and new opportunities,' 
he said. 

"Future historians will discuss our activities under a new chapter 

heading-- 1 The Atomic J? erf* . ' " 

("ore) 



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He deplored the fact that "at the outset of this Atomic Age, 
advancements in technology had far outstepped our social end political 
progress ," 

Future historians, he predicted, n will be compelled to state that", 
in spite of the ideal of a new world order as set forth in the Charter 
of the United Nations, international transactions far too often were 
carried on according to rules taken from heirloom editions of 'Power 
Politics. Ti ' 

He called attention to great strides in agricultural progress and 
in the science of nutrition, while at the same time "the illustrations 
for the Atomic Age chapter will show groups of starving children in 
various portions of the globe." 

v? If the authors use newspapers as source material, the footnotes to 
the chapter will refer not to articles about 'Peace in our time T but to 
articles about new methods of warfare which might annihilate the human 
race," he declared. 

Social thinking and political ideals must be synchronized with 
scientific knowledge and technological progress if "this chapter in 
world history is to end with a record of tangible contributions to the 
welfare of mankind rather than with the story of how our form of 
civilization was destroyed," Stevenson asserted. 

m 






Southern Illinois 
University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. B ^^^^^^^^__^^^ H! ^^^ H 



q 



6-14-4$ 

Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. John A. Stevenson, president of 

Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, has received an earned bachelor 

of arts degree from his first alma mater, Southern Illinois University, 

43 years after completion of his work here. The degree was conferred at 
the University annual commencement June 11. 

Southern does not confer honorary decrees, but on recommendation 

of President Chester F. Lay, and graduation officials, with the approval 

of the Teachers College Board, the University accepted the 2 l/2 y^ars 

work which Stevenson had completed here more than four decades ago, plus 

the additional work he completed at Ewing College, no longer in existence 

as the full requirements for an earned degree. 

President Lay pointed out that some of the functions of the former 
Ewing College a ^e now being carried on at Southern, through the Southern 
Baptist Foundation which is located here and is affiliated with the 
University to the extent that ministerial students enrolled in the 
Foundation obtain their academic training in the University, 

Dr. Stevenson, a native of Cobden, 111., who delivered the 

commencement address to the 194$ graduating class at Southern this 

morning, completed a two and one-half year course here in 1905. He then 

completed the bachelor of arts degree at Ewing College (190$), the master 

of arts at the University of Wisconsin (1912), the doctor of philosophy 

at the University of Illinois (191$), and received the honorary doctoral 

degree from the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia 

(1943). 

The bachelor's degree was conferred on Dr. Stevenson this morning 
by Frank G. Thompson, chairman of the State Teachers College Board and 
director of the State Department of Pcegistration and Education, 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^^^^^■MMBnanMMBHHMH 



6-14-43 

Carbondale, 111,, June - Officers, board members and 
representatives to the SIU Foundation board were elected by the Southern 
Illinois University Alumni Association at its recent annual banquet here 
in connection with commencement. 

Dr. Leo J. Brown of Carbondale was elected president to succeed Dr. 
Percival Bailey of Chicago; W, W. Vandeveer of Cleveland, Ohio, was 
elected President and Mrs. R„ E, Wiggins of Carbondale was chosen 
secretary- treasurer. 

Directors chosen to serve until 1951 included: Guy Gladson of 
Chicago, Dr. Bailey, Guy Karraker of Dongola, and Lowell E. Roberts of 
Chicago. Roberts and Dr. Bailey were re-elected. 

Alumni appointed to the SIU Foundation board were Dr. Bailey, 
Benjamin Wham of Chicc^o and Mr. Vandeveer, to serve until 1951- Dr, 
Bailey had previously served ex-officio as president of the Alumni 
Association, 

At the foundation board meeting, also held at commencement-time, 
E, M, Stotlar of Marion, whose term extends until 1950, was elected 
President; Roy Vail Jordan of Centralia, whose term also extends until 
1950, was chosen vice president. Members of the executive committee 
are J. E, Etherton of C a rbondale, to serve until 1950, chairman; Winton 
Walkup of Carbondale, to serve until 1949; and Gen, Robert W. Davis of 
Carbondale, member representing the State Teachers College Board, 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



6-14-4S 

Carbondale, 111., June - Appointment of Woodson W. Fishbach as 
associate professor of education at Southern Illinois University for the 
two-month summer session has been announced by University President 
Chester F. Lay. 

Mr. Fishoack holds the bachelor's and master ? s degrees from the 
University of Missouri and completed the doctoral degree at the 
University of Chicago this month. He has taught in Missouri public 
schools and was an educational officer in the U. S. Army for two years 
during the war. He has been holding a research assistantship at the 
University of Chicago while working on his doctor's degree. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. Carl C. Lindegren, director of the 
new biological science research laboratory at Southern Illinois 
University, and Mrs. Lindegren, who assists him in the laboratory, will 
sail from New York June 17 to attend three scientific meetings in 
Europe during the summer, returning August 1. 

On invitation of the French government, Dr. Lindegren will present 
a paper at the Seventh International Congress of Agricultural Industries 
in Paris July 12-1$. He will also participate in the Eighth 
International Genetics Congress in Stockholm, Sweden, July 7-14, and the 
International Zoological Congress in Paris July 21-27. 

### 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

■--—-——-——-——"—--—-—■—- University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. a ^^^^^^^ M ^^ M ^^ H ^^^^_, 



6-14-43 

Carbondale, 111., June - Mrs. John Robert Nelson, the former 
Patricia Mercer of Herrin, 1942 graduate of Southern Illinois 
University, is soon to leave for a year in Europe, where she and her 
husband will work with the American Friends Service Committee, 
University officials have been informed, 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson will be engaged in relief work for the 
Committee, which won the Nobel Peace Prize last year. They will attend 
the first meeting of the World Council of Churches in September at 
Amsterdam and will spend some time in Norway and Sweden before going 
to Zurich, Switzerland, where Mr. Nelson will study on his doctoral 
degree under the world-renowned theologian, Emil Brunner. 

For the past two years the Nelsons have been at the University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C., where Mr. Nelson has been director 
of the Wesley Foundation, Methodist student center. 

Mrs. Nelson was Homecoming Queen at Southern in 1941. She and 
Mr. Nelson met at Yale University where she was studying for her master's 
degree in health education. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ^^^^^^^mmm^mmumBmammmmK 



6-16-43 

Carbondale, 111., June - Southern Illinois public school educator; 
and school board members will have the opportunity to learn first-hand 
how one statewide school reorganization system works, when they attend a 
three-day conference at Southern Illinois University June 23-25-. 

Olin C. Nutter, superintendent of the Huntington city and Cabell 
County schools in West Virginia, will serve as consultant for the 
conference, according to Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, acting dean of the 
College of Education. 

Mr. Nutter heads a county-wide unit system of schools, embracing 
five senior high schools, six junior high schools and numerous 
elementary schouls, all coordinated in one administrative unit. A 
school administrator of 24 years T experience, he has headed the 
reorganized C a bell County and Huntington schools since 193&« 

Coordinator for the conference will be Dr. Howard E. Bosley, 
associate professor of education ahd chairman of Southern's Committee 
on school reorganization. 

County superintendents, city superintendents, principals, and 
school board members are being invited to attend the three-day session. 

On Wednesday, June 23, the conference will consider broad aspects 
of the West Virginia plan at the 9 a. m. session, examining the reasons 
for reorganization, the administrative structure of the county unit, 
how the Virginia schools are financed, problems of transition, how 



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choice of attendance centers was made, and building construction. 

The afternoon session, starting at 12:30, will examine the topic, 
"Ways in Which West Virginia's New Schools Do More for Children and 
Youth." 

On Thursday morning, the topic for study is "The Work of the 
Administrative, Supervisory, and Service Staff of the Cabell County 
Schools, !i followed in the afternoon by discussion of "The Management 
of Pupil Transportation in West Virginia."' 

Friday's program will consist of a special session for county 
superintendents . 

Wednesday's sessions will be in Shryock Auditorium. On Thursday 
and Friday, the meetings will be held in the Little Theatre. 



Carbondale, 111., June - Summer session enrollment at Southern 
Illinois University has reached 1,879, only 11 shy of the final 
registration for the summer term last year. 

Students may continue to sign up and pay fees through the remainder 
of this week, and late entrants will probably push the total enrollment 
to a figure above that of last year, officials said. 

m 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■^^^M^HHKMMMHB^MHHl 



6-16-48 

Carbondale, 111., June - a new departmental chairman to head the 
department of physical education for men at Southern Illinois University 
has been appointed, to assume his duties next fall, according to 
University President Chester F. Lay. 

Cecil Franklin from Indiana University, who by fall will hold one 
of the comparatively few doctoral degrees in physical education, has 
been named to the position which has not been filled on a permanent 
basis since the death in 1943 of the late William McAndrew, popular 
coach and athletic director. 

Mr. Franklin is completing his doctor's degree at Indiana University 
this summer. He has been holding a graduate assistantohip there, where 
his wife, also a physical education teacher, has been teaching full-time 
in the University School. 

Holder of both the bachelor's and master's degrees from Indiana 
University, he was added to the staff as soon as he graduated. He 
served in the University's physical fitness program before he went into 
the Air Corps, has had experience in the Bureau of Service and Research^ 
and has had almost full responsibility for the physical education classes 
for handicapped men students. He has also served as assistant director 
of campus recreation. As a student athlete, he was captain of the 
Indiana intercollegiate swimming team, and has had experience in several 
minor sports. 

### 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. aanMMHMMHHHlHMHMMMM 



Carbondale, 111,, June - Miss Sadie Kobbins of 152 Madison 
avenue, New York, N.Y., a former student at Southern Illinois 
University here, sailed June 10 from New York City, returning after a 
furlough to her post as registered nurse at the Victoria Memorial 
Hospital at Hanumakonda, Deccan, South India, where she has been 
stationed since 1925. 

Miss Kobbins completed a two-year course at Southern in 1914, and 
studied at Shurtleff College, Illinois Training School for Nurses, in 
the Nursing Education Department of Columbia Teachers College, the 
Baptist Missionary Training School, and Scarritt Bible College, 

She was teaching school when she responded to a call to foreign 
mission medical service. After completing her training for the R.N. 
degree she w as appointed by the Women's American Baptist Foreign 
Mission Society, and served at Vinukonda and Nalkonda, In 1925 she 
was assigned to the Victoria Memorial Hospital, which serves a 
community of more than 330,000 people. 

fiirrr 

Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. Douglas E. Lav/son, dean-elect of 

the College of Education at Southern Illinois University, will return 

to assume his new duties July 17, according to University President 
Chester F. Lay. 

Lawson, a member of the Southern faculty since 1935, has spent the 
past year as principal of the Punahou School in Hawaii, known as the 
world's largest private elementary school. 

JI.M.M. 

irffff 



f 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., June - An all-time high enrollment for the 
summer session has been reached at Southern Illinois University as 
1,902 students have enrolled up to Friday noon, compared to last year's 
previous peak of 1,88$. 

Students may continue to register through Monday, June 21. 

The slight leveling off in veteran enrollment observed during the 
past year is repeated this summer. So far a total of 912 veterans-- 
903 men and 9 v/omen--are registered, compared to 932--912 men and 15 
women- during the summer of 1947. 

Among the current summer- student body are 1,137 men and 765 v/omen. 



Carbondale, 111., June - Ben Watkins, assistant professor and 
acting chairman of the art department at Southern Illinois University, 
is listed in a recent Monthly Supplement of Who * s Who in America. 

m 



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Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., June - Several additional appointments for 
the summer session and a number of appointments for next year at 
Southern Illinois University have been announced by University President 
Chester F.. Lay. 

R. P. Hibbs, principal of the DuQuoin Township High School, will 
teach speech part-time during the summer session.. Mr, Hibbs holds the 
bachelor's degree from Baker University and the master's from the 
University of Wisconsin. This is his second consecutive summer on the 
Southern faculty. 

F. Morris Johnson will serve as instructor in industrial education 
during the summer term. He holds the bachelor's and master's degrees 
from Colorado State College of Education and has taken additional 
graduate work at the University of Kansas City. He has taught on the 
faculties of the Colorado State College of Education and the Iowa 
State Teachers College. 

Appointments to the permanent faculty include the following: 

Marvin E. Johnson as instructor in industrial education. Mr.. 
Johnson has begun his work this summer and will teach here next year, 
replacing Robert W. English, who is now on sabbatical leave to do work 
toward the doctoral degree. Mr. Johnson holds the bachelor's degree 
from Eastern Illinois State College and the master's degree from the 
University of Illinois, 

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Fred K. Lingle as assistant professor in University High School, 
effective Sept. 13. Mr. Lingle, who has taught in Southern's English 
department for several summer terms, holds the bachelor's degree from 
Southern, and the master's from the University of Illinois, and has done 
additional graduate work at the University of Southern California, the 
University of Wisconsin and New York University. He has taught in the 
high schools at Goreville, Carterville, and for the past several years 
at Herrin. 

Miss Caroline Raut as assistant professor in biological science 
and research, effective Sept. 13. Miss Raut holds the bachelor's degree 
from the University of Illinois and has done graduate work at George 
Washington University, Cornell University and Washington University in 
St. Louis. She has completed the doctoral degree at Washington 
University this spring. Miss Raut has served as an assistant in 
research at Cornell and Washington universities and has published a 
number of research papers in her field. 

ft mi 



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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■MMMHHHaHBBnHMMMBBHI 



6-18-48 

Carbondale, 111., June - Southern Illinois University's health 
education workshop for in-service teachers is getting underway for its 
fourth consecutive year under the direction of Ralph Boatman, University 
health coordinator and instructor of physiology. 

The State Department of Public Health and the Kellogg Foundation 
are cooperating with Southern's physiology and health education 
department in carrying on the program for this term. 

Campus consultants who are specialists in fields related to health 
education and a large number of off-campus consultants from the various 
state departments will lecture and serve as advisors for student projects' 

Individual problems are entirely different this year, according to 
Dr. marie A. Hinrichs, chairman of the physiology and health education 
department. She says that the in-service teacher is more concerned with 
ways and means of promoting good attitudes toward health teaching and 
health behavior than in the usual subject matter. 

i? They want to make the health program function, 11 Dr.. Hinrichs 
declared. 

Speakers who appeared before the group during the first week of 
the session included Kathleen Bellamy, Carbondale School Nurse; Kay 0. 
Duncan, State Director of Health, Physical Education and Safety; and 
Hazel O'Neal, Health Coordinator, Office of Public Instruction. 

The following guest speakers will appear during the succeeding 
weeks : 

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June 


21 


3:55 




22 


3:55 




24 


3:55 



Donald Ingli, Southern Illinois University, "Visual 
Education in the Classroom" 

Dr. W. A. Thalman, S.I.U., "Handicapped Children" 

Grace Dorah, University of Illinois Division of 
Crippled Children 1 s Services, Mt. Vernon, "Services 
for Handicapped Children" 

23 3:55 Miss Alice B. Roberts, Tampax Inc., Fulton, Ky. , 
"Menstrual Health" 

July 7 3:55 Congress of Parents and Teachers Conference 

11:55 Mrs. P. E. Peterson, Oak Park 

Mrs. Russell Oplinger, Oak Park 
Mrs. Melvin Lockhart, Cobden 

Lillian Merrett , Department of Public Health, 
Springfield, "Nutrition and the School Child" 

Araminta Bigelow, District Lunchroom Supervisor, 
Springfield, "The School Lunchroom" 

Dr. Clifton Hall',. Department of Public Health, 
Springfield , "Tuberculosis" 

Dr. Dale Scholz, Health Officer, Wabash County 
Health Department, 

"The County Health Department in the School Health 
Program" 

Helen E. Weaver, National Society for the Prevention 
of Blindness, New York, "Sight Saving in the 
Classroom" 

22 6:55 Dr. Howard E. Gowen, Department of Public Health, 

Springfield, "Cancer Control" 

26 R. E. Favreau, Sanitary Engineer, Department of 
Public Health, Carhondale, "The School Environment 
and the School Health Program" 

27 3:55 E. L. Uittonborn, Secretary, Statewide Health 

Committee, Springfield, "The School Teacher and 
C ommuni t y Organization 1 ' 

23 3:55 Margaret Cowdin, Department of Health Education, 

Springfield, "Public Health Education" 

August 2 3:55 Ailleen Neely, Regional Child Welfare Supervisor, 

Carbondale, "How the Welfare Worker and the Teacher 
Can Work Together" 

All sessions will be- held in Barracks Building 1-A and students, 
faculty, and the public are invited to attend. 

M 



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8:$5 


12 


3:55 


13 


3:55 


15 


3:55 




11:45 


21 


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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND. ED. ^^^^^^-—^^^^-—--^^gg. 



6-22-43 

Carbondale, 111., June - Thirteen of Southern Illinois 
University's graduates have been appointed part-time faculty assistants 
while continuing graduate work at Southern, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

These thirteen were selected for their exceptional scholarly 
attainments and their ability to carry on research. 

'•'Only in the last two years have we used graduate students to teach 
classes and then only as graduate or student assistants. Now we are 
able to grant graduate students a place on the regular faculty as part 
of the teaching and research staff of the University," President Lay 
declared. 

"We are doing it because we need their help and we think they are 
people who will develop into fine University faculty material; and 
because we want to help them carry on their careers," he added. 

Appointees for the summer term include: Mrs, Ilaxine Harris 
Blackman of Ramsey, assigned to Information Service and Alumni Records. 
Mrs. Blackman received the Bachelor of Arts Degree from Southern last 
summer, and has been a graduate assistant in Information Service for 
the past y^ar. She will complete the work for the master of science 
degree fall term. 

Mrs. June Fulkerson Todd of Carbondale, assistant in the English 
Department. Mrs. Todd was graduated with highest honors in this year's 
senior class. She was employed in the Registrar's Office as an under 

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graduate. 

Marvin 0. Garlich of Nashville, assistant in government, received 
the bachelor's degree from Southern in 1947. For the past year he has 
been teaching in the government department of the Effingham junior 
college, 

Lemuel Dalton Harry of Murphysboro, Dean of Men's Office. Harry 
has been a graduate assistant in the Dean of Men's Office since 
receiving his bachelor's decree last year. He will complete the work 
for the master's degree in August. 

William D. Hatley of Carrier Mills, Curriculum laboratory, holds 
the bachelor's and the master' s d egrees from Southern. He is doing 
additional graduate work toward the doctor's degree this summer. 

William T. Holder of Carbondale, government department, is a 1946 
graduate. He has been attending law school at Washington University, 
St. Louis, Mo., for the past year, 

Billy 0. Hoyle of Alto Pass, mathematics department. Hoyle has 
held a graduate assistant ship in the mathematics department since he 
received the bachelor's degree last year. 

David T. Kenney of Carbondale, government department, holds both 
the bachelor's and master's degrees from Southern. He held a graduate 
assistantship in the government department while completing the work 
for the master's degree. 

Pauline Potts of Keyesport, physiology and health education 
department. Miss Potts has held a graduate assistantship in the 
physiology and health education department for the past year while 
doing work toward the master's degree. She received the bachelor's 
degree in June, 1947. 

Williard E. Rodd of Marion, sociology department. Rodd received 

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the bachelor's degree last year and has held a graduate assistantship 
in the sociology department since that time. 

Albert Jene Shafter of Carbondale, sociology department, Shafter, 
a June graduate, was a student assistant in the sociology department as 
an under-graduate. 

Appointments effective September 13, 1943 to run through June 10, 
1949 include: William HcBride of Carbondale, department of physiology 
and health education. McBride is also a June graduate and served as a 
student assistant in the University bookstore as an under-graduate. 

Carl Wimberly of Granite City, government department. Wimberly 
was graduated with honors June 11. 

### 




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Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^BM^B^^^^^^^^^H^HMBH 



6-23-4S 

Carbondale, 111,, June - A 24-year-old Hindu scientist is 
completing the work for the doctor's degree in mycology under Dr. Carl 
C. Lindegren, Southern Illinois University's internationally-recognized 
research scientist. 

Balaji Mundkur, son of a Bombay, India, city official, last year 
used his prize Sethna Foundation loan merit scholarship to come to the 
United States in order to work under Dr. Lindegren, then on the staff 
of Washington University in St. Louis. 

Dr. Lindegren came to Southern Jan, 1 to direct Southern's new 
biological science research laboratory, and this month l^undkur followed 
him. 

The young Indian scientist is carrying on research work in the 
genetics of micro-organisms, and chose to study under Dr. Lindegren, 
who has attained a world-wide reputation for his genetics study of 
yeast cells. 

While Southern does not offer the doctor's degree, Iiundkur will 
be able to submit his study here this summer and next year as the final 
work for the doctor's degree to be conferred by Uashington University. 

Mundkur was graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree (honors) 
from the Royal Institute of Science in Bombay. After completing two 
years graduate work for the Associateship of the Imperial Agricultural 
Research Institute, New Dehli, India, Mundkur was granted the loan 
merit scholarship from the Sethna Foundation. All India's graduate 

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students .are eligible xor this scholarship regardless of University or 
religious sect. Mundkur, a Hindu, was chosen for his high scholarship 
and his ability in research. 

Mrs. iiohini Mundkur will join her husband here in September where 
she will enter Southern's graduate school. She has the Bachelor of 
Arts Degree from the University of Bombay and also the diploma in 
teaching. 

Both Mr, and Mrs. Mundkur intend to go back to India and teach 
after they complete che work for the doctor's and master's degrees 
respectively. 

Mundkur is the fifth foreign student in attendance at Southern 
this year. Others were Saad Salih Jaber, son of the former prime 
minister of Iraq; Betty Chung of Korea; Po Tu Tan, Chinese teacher; 
and Jose Luis Reyes, Mexican exchange student. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., June - The main feature of Southern Illinois 
University's recreational program for the summer is swimming for all 
students. 

Free transportation and free admission to Crab Orchard Lake is 
being provided by the men's and women's physical education department 
four afternoons each week. 

Students may attend these swimming sessions for recreation only, 
or may receive college credit if they participate in the swimming classes 
being taught at the lake three days a week. 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — m—mam—m—mm ————— University 

Information Service carbondale. ilunois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^MHHHHI^HHB 



6-23-4B 

Carbondale, 111., June - "Many people in West Virginia opposed 
reorganized schools at first, but now almost no one would go back to 
the old system if they could," Olin C. Nutter, W. Va. educator, told 
Southern Illinois teachers and school board members in the opening 
session of the three-day Reorganization Conference being held at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Mr. Nutter explained that the suddenness of the reorganization in 
West Virginia that came as a result of a legislative act in 1933, which 
abolished every school district in the state and created county districts 
caused a great deal of confusion. He along with other educators, greatl) 
opposed the plan, but soon found it to be sound and the benefits of more 
equipment and better school buildings to be well worthwhile, 

"In our system, i! Mr.- Nutter said, "the county is the unit of school 
administration and is controlled by a board elected by the people. 
These larger and more efficient districts have received far more liberal 
monetary appropriations than the previous small inefficient magistrate 
districts." 

"Larger appropriations have meant additional funds for buildings, 
salaries, free textbooks in the elementary schools, and for the addition 
of vocational training and fine arts to the curriculum," he continued. 
We have been able to provide full-time doctors, dentists, and nurses to 
minister the health needs of our pupils." 

These benefits of reorganization were brought out by Mr. Nutter in 
the first general session of the conference. 

a special session for county superintendents will be held Friday, 
at which time Mr. Nutter will a ct as consultant. 



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